CRTC Three-Year Plan 2016-2019

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Purpose of the Three-Year Plan

The plan provides a rolling three-year horizon of key CRTC activities. The document is intended to provide Canadians, industry and other interested stakeholders and groups with important information to prepare for and participate in the CRTC’s public processes. The communications environment evolves constantly. Accordingly, the CRTC may need to adjust its plan to respond to emerging issues.

Who we are and what we do

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) is an administrative tribunal within the Government of Canada that is responsible for regulating and supervising Canada’s communication system in the public interest.

What does it mean to be an administrative tribunal?

The CRTC is a specialized government agency that was established under federal legislation to develop, implement and enforce regulatory policies on the Canadian communications system. The CRTC performs a wide range of functions, including rule making and policy development, but also has the quasi-judicial powers of a superior court with respect to the production and examination of evidence and the enforcement of its decisions.

Administrative tribunals operate at arm’s length from the federal government; however, the CRTC reports to Parliament through the Minister of Canadian Heritage. The CRTC’s operations are subject to the Government of Canada’s policies and guidelines, which aim to ensure management excellence and accountability to Canadians.

 Regulatory principles

The CRTC operates under a number of legislative authorities and Acts of Parliament. These include the following: the CRTC Act, the Bell Canada Act, the Broadcasting Act, the Telecommunications Act, Canada’s Anti-Spam Legislation and the Canada Elections Act, which includes provisions that established the Voter Contact Registry.

At the heart of our mandate is the duty to serve the public interest by putting Canadians at the centre of the communications system. To this end, our role encompasses consulting Canadians on communications issues of importance to them, dealing with the many applications we receive by making decisions and rules, responding to enquiries and complaints, as well as reporting to Canadians on the progress and outcomes of our work. The CRTC promotes and enforces compliance with its regulatory policies and decisions. It encourages and facilitates industry co-regulation and self-regulation through consultations, committees and working groups with various industry stakeholders. The CRTC also plays a key role in resolving industry disputes. Finally, in the current dynamic and evolving communications environment, the CRTC collaborates with various domestic and international stakeholders to leverage capacity and intelligence on a host of interrelated policy issues and questions.

The CRTC’s strategic framework

Graphic representing the CRTC’s overarching objective – Canadians have access to a world-class communications system.  This overarching objective is supported by three pillars – create, connect and protect and is rooted in a commitment to management excellence.

Guided by its legislative mandate, the CRTC seeks to ensure that Canadians have access to a world-class
communications system. This overarching objective is supported by three pillars — create, connect, and protect— and is rooted in a commitment to management excellence.

CREATE

This pillar focuses on ensuring that a wealth of Canadian content is created and made available to all Canadians on a variety of platforms. Through its orders, decisions, licensing frameworks and other regulatory activities, the CRTC encourages the creation of diverse and compelling programming that reflects the ideas, perspectives and artistic creativity of Canadians. By enabling Canadian content in entertainment and news programming, the CRTC enhances Canadian’s ability to participate in Canada’s democratic and cultural life.

Key objectives and outcomes for Canadians:

CONNECT

This pillar focuses on ensuring that Canadians can connect to a choice of accessible, innovative and quality communication services at affordable prices. Through its regulatory frameworks, the CRTC ensures that Canadians have a choice of quality and affordable communication service providers for telephone, internet access, wireless and broadcasting distribution services. The CRTC also monitors the practices of communication service providers to ensure that all Canadians, including those with disabilities, have the means and tools to participate fully in the digital economy.

Key objectives and outcomes for Canadians:

PROTECT

This pillar focuses on ensuring that Canadians have access to information and services that enhance their safety, including protection from unsolicited communications. Through its regulatory frameworks, the CRTC promotes compliance and enforcement of laws and regulations that help ensure that Canadians have access to emergency communication services such as 9-1-1 service and public alerting systems. The CRTC also seeks to enhance the privacy and protection of Canadians by promoting and enforcing its rules and regulations related to unsolicited commercial communications.

Key objectives and outcomes for Canadians:

Underlying the work related to each of the pillars is a commitment to MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE. Through continuous improvement to various processes, mechanisms and structures, the CRTC strives for effective and efficient management practices that exemplify our commitment to strong values and ethics, public accountability, client service, and value for money. It also works to create a healthy, motivating work environment that is innovative, respectful, and inclusive.

Ongoing Work to Fulfill our Mandate

The CRTC’s ongoing operational responsibilities include the following:

Regulatory Policy, Legislative Implementation and Regulation

Outreach and Engagement with Stakeholders and Canadians

Monitoring, Compliance and Enforcement

Management Excellence and Accountability

Canadians at the Centre of their Communications System in 2015-16

You know what your choices are: The CRTC launched a new online tool to help you find the phone, mobile, Internet and television services available in your area.

You have access to better information about products and services from television service providers: New TV Service Provider Code sets out rules for how companies handle changes to programming options, services calls, service outages and disconnections.

TV your way: You have choice including the ability to pick and pay for the channels you want and TV providers must give you the option of purchasing a skinny basic package. You can also cancel or switch your cable or satellite service without having to give 30 days’ notice.

Fairer wireless contracts: As of June 2015 Canadians could break their legacy 3-year wireless service contracts with little or no penalties.

Ensuring your participation in the digital economy: 280 communities in rural and remote communities now have access to broadband internet as a result of the establishment of deferral accounts.

Assuring the quality of your communications system: The CRTC conducted the first-ever pan-Canadian broadband performance measurement exercise to help ascertain whether you are getting the level of service you pay for.

Your communications system is working to keep you safe: Radio and TV stations must issue emergency alert messages. Text with 9-1-1 is now available in 7 provinces to Canadians to hearing or speech impaired persons.

Your communications system is more secure: the CRTC carried out its first ever warrants under the Telecommunications Act and CASL. The first took enforcement actions to stop a significant telemarketing operation allegedly making unauthorized calls selling anti-virus software to Canadians. The second took down a “command and control” server in Toronto that was distributing malware that had infected more than one million computers in over 190 countries.

The CRTC created list of services available for Syrian refugees: the CRTC created a list on its website that includes information on mobile phone contract rights, TV and radio stations available in Arabic and how to access 911 emergency services.

Awards and Achievements

Public Service Award of Excellence – Modernizing Northern Telecommunications Team:  The team was recognized for addressing the challenges of accessing affordable, reliable telecommunications services by Canadians living in the North.

Community of Federal Regulators Awards:

An award from the Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions for our Lens 41 tool, used to assess the effects of its decisions and policies on official language minority communities. This was one of three tools that won the “Spotlight on the top 10 best practices” contest.

Recognized by the Association of Professional Executives of the Public Service of Canada for its innovative work on behalf of Canadians who are Deaf, hard of hearing, or who have a communication disability.

Ranked as one of the best places to work in the federal public service (agencies with over 150 employees) according to the most recent results of the Public Service Employee Survey.

TRENDS AND FACTS
Create

Create Infograph 1. Description follows.
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Average number of hours Canadians watch traditional television each week

  • 12-17 = 20 hours
  • 18-34 = 21 hours
  • 35-49 = 24 hours
  • 50-64 = 33 hours
  • 65+ = 42 hours

Average number of hours Canadians (12+) listen to radio each week

17 hours

Use of streaming services by Canadians in 2014

  • 52% music video streaming on YouTube
  • 22% AM/FM radio online streaming
  • 18% personalized music streaming
  • 21% podcast listening

Dollars spent on Canadian Productions

In total, supports for programs made by Canadians were worth more than $4.1 billion in 2012-2013. Almost two thirds (65.6%), or $2.7 billion of this amount comes directly from the expenditures of Canadian television programming services on programs made by Canadians. The remaining amounts come from federal and provincial tax credits (15.8%), the CMF (9%), tangible benefits (4.8%), the contributions of Broadcasting Distribution Undertakings to community programming (3%) and various certified independent production funds, excluding the Canada Media Fund (1.5%).

Sources: Communications Monitoring Report published October 2015, including data from Numeris, Media Technology Monitor, Statistics Canada

Highlights of 2015-16 Activities
Create – Modernizing the regulatory framework for the Canadian broadcasting system

Activities that the CRTC commited to for 2015-16 in the CRTC Three-Year Plan 2015-2018 that are completedCanadian children’s television
On 1 September 2015, the CRTC implemented new methods for monitoring the amount of Canadian children’s and youth television programming broadcast and the expenditures on this type of programming in the Canadian broadcasting system.

Television licensees must now record their programs’ target audiences in their program logs using new target audience markers and must break down their total programming expenditures by target audience in their annual returns.

The additional data collected will allow the CRTC to monitor effectively the amount of Canadian children’s and youth programming available in the Canadian broadcasting system, as well as the expenditures on such programming.

Activities that the CRTC commited to for 2015-16 in the CRTC Three-Year Plan 2015-2018 that are completedLicensing criteria for national news
In September 2015, the CRTC issued revised standard conditions of license for Canadian discretionary services operating as national news services.

These new requirements will ensure that Canadians have access to high-quality news and information and are exposed to news and information from a diversity of views on matters of public concern.

Activities that the CRTC commited to for 2015-16 in the CRTC Three-Year Plan 2015-2018 that are completedVideo-on-demand

In August 2015, the CRTC set out a revised exemption order for certain classes of video-on-demand undertakings, as well as updated standard conditions of license for licensed video-on-demand undertakings. The revised exemption order created a new hybrid video-on-demand service category, along with the rules that apply to this category. This included the requirement that the service be offered over the Internet to all Canadians without the need for a subscription to a specific broadcasting distribution undertaking, mobile service or retail Internet access service. As a result of these changes, Canadians will have more opportunities to discover Canadian programming, including original Canadian programming, on multiple Canadian-operated platforms. Further, Canadian companies will be able to compete on an equal footing in an on-demand environment.

Activities that the CRTC commited to for 2015-16 in the CRTC Three-Year Plan 2015-2018 that are completedExemption orders for discretionary services

In March 2015, the CRTC issued a new exemption order for all specialty and pay services that serve fewer than 200,000 subscribers, thereby facilitating greater competition and increased program flexibility. This exemption order also reduces the regulatory burden for discretionary services with few subscribers.

Activities that the CRTC commited to for 2015-16 in the CRTC Three-Year Plan 2015-2018 that are completedCultural diversity policy

The CRTC commissioned a study to assess the progress made by Canadian broadcasters in reflecting cultural diversity within the Canadian television broadcasting system.

Activities that the CRTC commited to for 2015-16 in the CRTC Three-Year Plan 2015-2018 that are completedDiscoverability of Canadian programs

The CRTC and the National Film Board (NFB) held two pre-events to kick-start the conversation on the discoverability of audiovisual content on 1 December in Vancouver and 3 December in Montreal. The En route to the Discoverability Summit: Content in the Age of Abundance events were live streamed and gathered experts from a variety of fields. Preliminary ideas and strategies were brought to the table and will be explored further at the Discoverability Summit in 2016.

Three-Year Outlook
Create – Modernizing the regulatory framework for the Canadian broadcasting system

CREATE
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
Discoverability of Canadian programs
The CRTC will hold an international, two-day Discoverability Summit in May 2016 to explore solutions to improve the discoverability of audiovisual content.
   
Canadian production funds
The CRTC will issue a decision on revising the criteria for Canadian independent production funds, with the primary objective of ensuring that these funds contribute to the development of a robust Canadian production sector that is better able to offer compelling, high-quality content to Canadians and global markets.
The CRTC will monitor compliance with the revised criteria. The CRTC will monitor compliance with the revised criteria.
Elimination of genre protection
The CRTC will encourage programming flexibility and domestic competition by processing applications to remove genre protections from the licences of programming services.
The CRTC will continue to process applications to remove genre protections from the licences of programming services. Remaining genre protections will be removed from the licences of independent programming services as part of their licence renewals.
Canadian content regulation
The CRTC will participate in a working group with the Canada Media Fund, Telefilm and Rogers Telefund to assist with implementing pilot projects in the area of Canadian content certification. The CRTC will process certification requests from the production sector in accordance with the pilot projects.
The CRTC will process certification requests from the production sector in accordance with the pilot projects. The CRTC will process certification requests from the production sector in accordance with the pilot projects.
Audience measurement
The industry working group will continue to develop a set-top box audience measurement system.
The CRTC will monitor the implementation of a set-top box audience measurement system. The CRTC will monitor the implementation of a set-top box audience measurement system.
Multicultural radio licensingFootnote 1
The CRTC will issue a notice of consultation to undertake a targeted review of its Ethnic Radio Policy, which is specifically designed for over-the-air radio services. As part of the review, the CRTC will respond to changes in the demographic make-up of multicultural communities in Canada.
Based on the results of the targeted review, the CRTC will issue a revised framework for multicultural radio services. The CRTC will implement and monitor the new framework.
Renewal of French-language TVFootnote 2
Following a public process, the CRTC will issue decisions to renew the licences for the French-language television stations owned by Quebecor Media Inc., Remstar Diffusion and Télé-Québec.
The CRTC will monitor and assess the effectiveness of the licensees’ new obligations. The CRTC will monitor and assess the effectiveness of the licensees’ new obligations.
Renewal of English-language TVFootnote 3
Following a public process, the CRTC will issue decisions to renew the licences of Bell Media Inc., Shaw Media Inc., Corus Entertainment Inc. and Rogers Media Inc.
The CRTC will monitor and assess the effectiveness of the licensees’ new obligations. The CRTC will monitor and assess the effectiveness of the licensees’ new obligations.
Consultation on community and local TVFootnote 4
The CRTC will issue a revised policy on local and community channel programming to ensure that appropriate policies and regulations are in place relating to locally relevant, locally reflective and community access programming. It will also begin to implement the renewed framework.
The CRTC will monitor and assess the effectiveness of the renewed framework. The CRTC will monitor and assess the effectiveness of the renewed framework.
Review of French-language vocal musicFootnote 5
Following a public process, the CRTC will issue a revised regulatory framework for French-language vocal music (FVM) applicable to the French-language commercial radio sector to ensure that it is flexible and up-to-date, and takes into account the current and future environment. The CRTC will consider, among other things, the possibility of implementing innovative measures to support the creation, discovery, promotion and consumption of FVM to allow this sector to better support French-speaking Canadian artists, and in turn, enrich the broadcasting system.
The CRTC will monitor the implementation of the new regulatory framework. The CRTC will monitor the implementation of the new regulatory framework.

Obligations under Part VII, section 41 of the Official Languages Act
The CRTC will hold two CRTC-official language minority communities (OLMC) discussion-group meetings as part of its ongoing commitment under the Official Languages Act (OLA).

The discussion-group meetings represent an important forum to exchange information on the needs and priorities of the OLMCs.

The CRTC will prepare the Review of the Implementation of Section 41 of the OLA and make an amendment to its three-year Results-Based Action Plan.

The CRTC will hold two CRTC-OLMC discussion-group meetings.

The CRTC will prepare the Review of the Implementation of Section 41 of the OLA.

The CRTC will hold two CRTC-OLMC discussion-group meetings.

The CRTC will prepare the Review of the Implementation of Section 41 of the OLA.

Cultural diversity policy reviewFootnote 6
The CRTC will commission a study on the reflection of the diversity of Canadian society within the Canadian television broadcasting system.

A fact-finding exercise may be initiated to enhance the CRTC’s understanding of the issues and perspectives related to cultural diversity with respect to television and broadcasting within the Canadian television broadcasting system.

If necessary, the CRTC will publish a notice of consultation to consider the effectiveness of the regulatory policy framework.

The CRTC will publish a decision on the regulatory policy framework, if required.
Indigenous Radio PolicyFootnote 7
The CRTC will issue a notice of consultation to undertake a review of its Native Radio Policy to ensure that the regulatory framework is effective and reflects the realities of radio stations serving Aboriginal peoples.
Based upon the results of the review, the CRTC will issue a revised framework and initiate follow-up proceedings, if required. The CRTC will implement and monitor the new framework.

TRENDS AND FACTS
Connect

Connect Infograph 1. Description follows.
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Connect Infograph 3. Description follows.
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Technology used by Canadians subscribed to various television services

  • 63 % cable
  • 22 % for satellite
  • 15 % for Internet Protocol television

Mobile technology adoption

  • Over 19 million Canadians subscribed to mobile broadband in 2014, compared to 17.6 million in 2013 and 13.2 million in 2011.
  • 66% of Canadians own a smartphone
  • 49% of Canadians own a tablet

Wireless vs. Wireline

  • More Canadians now subscribe exclusively to mobile wireless services (20.4%) than to wireline (i.e., landline) telephone services (14.4%).

Percentage of subscribers by advertised download speed in 2014 (residential only)

  • Less than 1.5 MbpsFootnote 8: 2%
  • 1.5 to 4 Mbps: 4%
  • 5 to 9 Mbps: 27%
  • 10 to 15 Mbps: 26%
  • 16 to 49 Mbps: 32%
  • Over 50 Mbps: 9%

Canadian households paid an average of $203 per month for their communications services in 2014

  • Wireless phone: $79
  • Television: $54 
  • Internet: $39 
  • Home telephone: $31

Source: Communications Monitoring Report published October 2015, including data from Numeris, Media Technology Monitor, Statistics Canada

Highlights of 2015-16 Activities
Connect – Improving access to advanced and competitive communications services

Activities that the CRTC commited to for 2015-16 in the CRTC Three-Year Plan 2015-2018 that are completedBasic telecommunications services

The CRTC completed the first two phases of a review to determine which telecommunications services are required by all Canadians to fully participate in the digital economy. Phase 1 focused on reviewing CRTC policies regarding basic telecommunications services in Canada and gathering information from the industry to better understand which telecommunications services are being offered across Canada and whether any areas in Canada are underserved or unserved. Phase 2 invited Canadians to submit their opinions on the telecommunications services they consider necessary to participate meaningfully in the digital economy.

Activities that the CRTC commited to for 2015-16 in the CRTC Three-Year Plan 2015-2018 that are completedAmendments to the exemption order for broadcasting distribution undertakings with under 20,000 subscribers

The CRTC issued a revised exemption order for terrestrial broadcasting distribution undertakings (BDUs) serving fewer than 20,000 subscribers in December 2015. Exempt BDUs serving more than 2,000 subscribers must now distribute the programming services TV5 and UNIS (collectively, TV5/UNIS), AMI-tv Français and ARTV. This will ensure that more Canadians, including those located in official language minority communities and those who are blind and visually impaired, have access to high-quality French-language programming. In addition, amendments to that exemption order harmonize the regimes of both exempt and licensed BDUs for contributions to Canadian programming.

Activities that the CRTC commited to for 2015-16 in the CRTC Three-Year Plan 2015-2018 that are completedWholesale mobile wireless services

The CRTC issued Telecom Regulatory Policy 2015-177 on 5 May 2015. The CRTC determined that it must regulate the wholesale roaming rates due to insufficient competition and directed Bell Mobility, Rogers and Telus Communications Company to file proposed tariffs for wholesale roaming. The CRTC established interim wholesale roaming rates.

Activities that the CRTC commited to for 2015-16 in the CRTC Three-Year Plan 2015-2018 that are ongoingWholesale code of conduct

In September 2015, the CRTC announced the new Wholesale Code, which governs certain aspects of the commercial arrangements between BDUs, programming undertakings and exempt digital media undertakings. The wholesale code will serve as a guideline for all other parties, including exempt BDUs, exempt programming undertakings, exempt digital media undertakings and non-Canadian programming services distributed in Canada. The CRTC will also apply the wholesale code in resolving disputes.

Activities that the CRTC commited to for 2015-16 in the CRTC Three-Year Plan 2015-2018 that are ongoingWholesale services and associated policies

In July 2015, the CRTC issued a decision regarding its review of wholesale wireline services, whereby it mandated disaggregated wholesale high-speed access services. Subsequently, it launched the implementation of the new regulatory measures.

Activities that the CRTC commited to for 2015-16 in the CRTC Three-Year Plan 2015-2018 that are ongoingBroadband performance measurement

To date, over 4,300 Canadians are participating in the CRTC’s Broadband Performance Measurement Program. The CRTC initiated conversations with smaller Internet service providers to encourage participation in the next phase of the project.

The CRTC published its first report, which provided Canadians with a first look at the state of broadband performance in Canada.

Activities that the CRTC commited to for 2015-16 in the CRTC Three-Year Plan 2015-2018 that are ongoingAccessibility of mobile wireless handsets

A Technical Roundtable was held in June 2015 concerning the availability and accessibility of mobile wireless handsets for consumers with disabilities.

Three-Year Outlook
Connect – Improving access to advanced and competitive communications services

CONNECT
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19

Basic telecommunications services
The CRTC is examining which telecommunications services are required by all Canadians to participate meaningfully in the digital economy, as well as the CRTC’s role in ensuring the availability of affordable basic telecommunications services to all Canadians.

The CRTC is reviewing its policies regarding basic telecommunications services in Canada. In addition, it is gathering information from the industry and seeking the views of Canadians to better understand which telecommunications services are being offered across Canada and whether any areas in Canada are underserved or unserved. The CRTC is also examining whether there should be changes to the subsidy regime and the national contribution mechanism.

The CRTC will conclude its review, which will include an oral public hearing, and will issue a decision.

Further, it will implement new measures, if any, and initiate follow-up proceedings, as required, following the decision.

The CRTC will continue to implement new measures, if any, as well as monitor their effectiveness. The CRTC will monitor the effectiveness of new regulatory measures, if any.

newManagement of Internet traffic
In 2009, the CRTC established rules concerning the management of Internet traffic. Recently, it has received requests to address issues concerning certain traffic management practices.

The CRTC will issue a decision on the current proceeding and will initiate a review, if appropriate, with respect to the treatment of Internet traffic by Internet service providers (ISPs).

   

Modernization plan for Northwestel
In 2013, Northwestel filed its initial plan to modernize its network infrastructure. The current modernization plan that ends in 2017 addresses infrastructure updates to ensure northern customers receive telecommunications services comparable to those available in Southern Canada.

The CRTC will continue to monitor the implementation of Northwestel’s network modernization plan.

The CRTC will continue to monitor the implementation of Northwestel’s network modernization plan. The CRTC will complete its monitoring of Northwestel’s network modernization plan.
newNorthwestel’s regulatory framework
In December 2013, the CRTC determined that price cap regulation was the appropriate form of regulation for Northwestel’s tariffed services and that the regime would be in effect for the next four years. The regime is set to expire at the end of 2017. The CRTC will initiate a review of Northwestel’s regulatory framework, including its price cap regime.
The CRTC will conclude its review of Northwestel’s regulatory framework, issue a decision and implement new measures, if any, following the decision. The CRTC will monitor the effectiveness of new measures, if any.

newWholesale high-speed access services (disaggregated) - Stage 1: Ontario and Quebec
In July 2015, the CRTC issued a decision regarding the review of wholesale wireline services (including fibre-to-the-premises facilities) and associated policies.

In that decision, the CRTC determined that access to wholesale high-speed access is to be made available to competitors closer to an end customer’s premises, including fiber access (disaggregated wholesale high-speed access services). This wholesale service enables competitors to offer broadband services.

As part of the first stage, the CRTC will issue a decision regarding the configurations for disaggregated wholesale high-speed access services in Ontario and Quebec.

The CRTC will also initiate tariff processes to establish rates for the configurations in Ontario and Quebec for Bell Canada, Bell Aliant, Cogeco, Rogers and Videotron.

The CRTC will issue decisions approving final rates for disaggregated wholesale high-speed access services in Ontario and Quebec for Bell Canada, Bell Aliant, Cogeco, Rogers and Videotron.  
newWholesale high-speed access services (disaggregated) - Stage 2: other regions
The CRTC will initiate processes regarding the configurations for disaggregated wholesale high-speed access services for other incumbent carriers operating in other regions.
The CRTC will initiate tariff processes to establish rates for the configurations of other incumbent carriers in these regions. The CRTC will finish issuing decisions approving final rates for disaggregated wholesale high-speed access services in these regions.

Wholesale high-speed access services (aggregated)
In May 2015, the CRTC sought comments from certain cable and phone companies on their existing wholesale high-speed access (HSA) services’ rates to establish a more efficient rate-setting process for the introduction of new speeds and to review certain cost inputs.

Rates for wholesale HSA services will be supported by new cost studies based on a streamlined cost structure.

The CRTC will review the rates of aggregated wholesale high-speed access services for the large cable and telephone companies.

The CRTC will finalize the rates for aggregated wholesale high-speed access services for the large cable and telephone companies.  
new

Wholesale services rate-setting elements
The CRTC will review other cost inputs that generally impact wholesale service rates.

The CRTC will initiate a process to review certain wholesale services rate-setting elements, including cost of equity ratio values, cost study expenses and compensation for risk associated with upfront investment.

The CRTC will implement new measures, if any, as well as monitor their effectiveness.

Wholesale mobile wireless services (roaming)
In May 2015, the CRTC issued a decision on the regulatory framework for wholesale mobile wireless services. As part of this decision, the CRTC determined that wholesale roaming services (voice, text and data) offered by Bell Mobility, Rogers and Telus must be provided to other wireless providers so that they can roam at reasonable rates on the national wireless networks.

The CRTC will establish the tariff rates, terms and conditions for domestic wholesale wireless roaming services (voice, text and data) provided by the national wireless carriers to other wireless carriers offering service in Canada.

   

Telesat’s satellite price ceiling
The price ceiling for Telesat’s C‑band fixed satellite services has not been reviewed since it was established in 1999. Following the conclusions reached by the CRTC Inquiry Officer in her 2014 review of the satellite industry, the CRTC will conduct a review of the current price ceiling and other related matters for Telesat’s C-band fixed satellite services.

The CRTC will issue a decision on the price ceiling and other related matters for Telesat’s C-band fixed satellite services used to provide telecommunications services in Canada. Fixed satellite services are used as an input by telecommunications companies to provide services in many rural and remote communities.

The CRTC will implement new measures, if any.

The CRTC will monitor the effectiveness of any new regulatory measures, if any. The CRTC will monitor the effectiveness of any new regulatory measures, if any.

Competitor quality of service
The purpose of the competitor quality of service regime is to ensure that competitors receive a high quality of service from the incumbent companies with respect to wholesale services.

The CRTC will initiate a process to review the competitor quality of service indicators and the rate rebate plan for competitors.

The CRTC will issue its decision, as well as implement and monitor the effectiveness of new regulatory measures, if any. The CRTC will monitor the effectiveness of new regulatory measures, if any.

Internet Protocol (IP) voice network interconnection
In 2012, the CRTC established a
set of principles to facilitate Internet Protocol (IP) voice network interconnection between network operators to support the development of next-generation networks.

The CRTC will continue to gather evidence and conduct a fact-finding exercise to determine the extent to which telecommunications service providers have implemented IP voice network interconnection in Canada.

The CRTC will initiate a review, if appropriate, of the IP voice network interconnection regulatory framework between carriers.  

Broadband performance measurement
Results from the first year of testing on a national measurement campaign will be published as a standalone report prepared by the testing vendor.

The CRTC will explore options for extending its established measurement program to other ISPs (including wholesale ISPs, resellers, satellite providers and fixed wireless providers).

The CRTC will explore methodologies that could be used to assess mobile network performance and undertake preliminary discussion with the wireless industry.

Results from the previous year’s national testing will be published in the Communications Monitoring Report and/or in a standalone report prepared by the testing vendor or the Commission.

The CRTC will explore other mechanisms for enhanced reporting and availability of data for the public.

In collaboration with wireless carriers, and depending on results from feasibility testing, the CRTC may extend the measurement project to include wireless broadband providers.

The CRTC will continue data collection from program participants.

The CRTC will also conduct ongoing research on potential new tests to perform to enhance the utility of the project.

The CRTC will continue publication of testing results.

newA targeted review of the quality standard for accuracy of closed captioning for English-language live programming
Further to industry reports received, the CRTC will complete a targeted review of the quality standards for closed captioning of English-language live programming to ensure that people who are deaf or hard of hearing have full access to television programming.
The CRTC will monitor the implementation of any requirements resulting from the targeted review.  
Payphones
The CRTC will complete the follow-up on processes that enable consumers who make non-cash payphone long-distance calls to have the rate information they need to make informed decisions about whether to complete the call.
The CRTC will monitor the implementation of any requirements resulting from the follow-up processes.  
Accessibility of mobile wireless handsets
Based on the outcome of the 2015 Technical Roundtable, the CRTC will consider progress on industry implementation of the Accessibility Policy.
The CRTC will monitor industry implementation of and compliance with the regulatory framework regarding the accessibility of mobile wireless handsets.  
Video Relay Services
The CRTC will monitor the implementation of Video Relay Services (VRSs) in Canada through a review of the Annual Report submitted by the VRS administrator, the budget proposal by the VRS administrator and complaints received from the public.
The CRTC will monitor the implementation of VRSs in Canada through a review of the Annual Report submitted by the VRS administrator, the budget proposal by the VRS administrator and complaints received from the public.

The CRTC will monitor the implementation of VRSs in Canada through a review of the Annual Report submitted by the VRS administrator, the budget proposal by the VRS administrator and complaints received from the public.

The CRTC will begin preparations for the review of the VRS Regulatory Framework.

TRENDS AND FACTS
Protect

Protect Infograph 1. Description follows.
Protect Infograph 2. Description follows.
Protect Infograph 3. Description follows.
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Spam

37% reduction in spam originating in Canada since Canada’s Anti-Spam Law (CASL) came into effect on July 1, 2014. (source: Cloudmark)
Over 525,000 submissions of spam have been received by the CRTC’s Spam Reporting Centre since Canada’s Anti-Spam Law came into effect.

In 2015-16, the CRTC issued:

  • 2 Notices of Violation with over $1.7 million in administrative monetary penalties
  • 59 Notices to Produce
  • 3 Undertakings with payments of $398,000
  • 1 Citation, 2 Warrants and its first Enforcement Advisory.

Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules

In 2015-16, the CRTC issued:

  • 28 Notices of Violation with over $2.5 million in administrative monetary penalties
  • over 100 Citations
  • over 250 Warning Letters

National Emergency Alerting

85% of broadcasters are compliant with the national emergency alerting system. Some 200 threat to life alerts were distributed by broadcasters in the first two months of 2016. (Source: CRTC and Pelmorex)

9-1-1 Services

Text with 9-1-1 is now available in 7 provinces to Canadians who are Deaf, hard of hearing, or who have a communications disability.

National Do Not Call List

The percentage of complaints related to unsolicited telemarketing calls received by the CRTC in 2014-15 by province and territory are as follows: 48% Ontario, 19% Quebec, 11% Alberta, 11% British Columbia, 4% Manitoba, 3% Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island, 2% Saskatchewan, 1% in each of New Brunswick and Newfoundland, and less than 1% for all of the territories.

Highlights of 2015-16 Activities
Protect – Strengthening the security and safety of Canadians within the communications system

Activities that the CRTC commited to for 2015-16 in the CRTC Three-Year Plan 2015-2018 that are completedNational Do Not Call List

The CRTC released a decision regarding the appropriate fees for non-exempted telemarketers and clients of telemarketers for subscribing to the National Do Not Call List (DNCL) that amended the Unsolicited Telecommunications Fees Regulations, which included an increase in rates for access to the National DNCL. In its regular communications, the CRTC continued to inform Canadians that adding their numbers to the National DNCL is a one-time permanent registration. FAQs on permanent number registration were added to the National DNCL website.

Activities that the CRTC commited to for 2015-16 in the CRTC Three-Year Plan 2015-2018 that are completedConsumer Television Service Provider Code

The CRTC published its Consumer Television Service Provider Code for Consumers in January 2016. The Code makes it easier for Canadians to understand their television service agreements and empowers customers in their relationships with television service providers.

Activities that the CRTC commited to for 2015-16 in the CRTC Three-Year Plan 2015-2018 that are completedCommissioner for Complaints for Telecommunications Services Review

The CRTC conducted a public consultation and published a decision on the structure and mandate of the Commissioner for Complaints for Telecommunications Services (CCTS). The CCTS’s role was expanded to address complaints about television services providers.

Activities that the CRTC commited to for 2015-16 in the CRTC Three-Year Plan 2015-2018 that are ongoing 9-1-1

In July 2015, the CRTC launched a proceeding on matters related to the reliability and resiliency of the 9‑1-1 networks.

As part of its assessment of the performance of wireless communications companies in providing caller location information to 9-1-1 call centres, the CRTC received results from the wireless companies in August 2015 and February 2016.

Activities that the CRTC commited to for 2015-16 in the CRTC Three-Year Plan 2015-2018 that are ongoingCanada’s Anti-Spam Legislation – Compliance and enforcement

The CRTC executed its first warrant under Canada’s Anti-Spam Legislation to take down a “command and control” server that was distributing malware, a type of malicious software that had infected more than one million computers in over 190 countries.

Activities that the CRTC commited to for 2015-16 in the CRTC Three-Year Plan 2015-2018 that are ongoingUnsolicited Telecommunications Rules – Compliance and enforcement

The CRTC participated in conferences and meetings with industry representatives, targeting home improvement, home security, insurance and financial services to promote compliance with the Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules. The CRTC issued timely alerts to warn Canadians about a rash of fraudulent and illegal calls from individuals claiming to represent the Canada Revenue Agency, the National DNCL Operator or vacation companies. The CRTC executed its first warrant under the Telecommunications Act to enter and inspect a property as part of an investigation of a significant telemarketing operation that was alleged to be making unauthorized calls for the purpose of selling anti-virus software to Canadians.

Activities that the CRTC commited to for 2015-16 in the CRTC Three-Year Plan 2015-2018 that are ongoingVoter Contact Registry

The Voter Contact Registry was fully implemented in advance of the Federal General Election that was held in October 2015. To promote compliance, the CRTC released FAQs and information about registration requirements.  In addition, outreach sessions and conference calls with political parties were held in advance of the announcement of the election period. To inform Canadians, the CRTC released a guide and developed radio spots for broadcast during the election period.  Following the election, 1,460 registration notices filed with the CRTC were published. Registration notices and complaints from Canadians were analyzed, and investigations were undertaken.

Activities that the CRTC commited to for 2015-16 in the CRTC Three-Year Plan 2015-2018 that are ongoingCaller ID spoofing

The CRTC conducted a public consultation that included requesting telephone and wireless telephone companies, as well as other vendors, to provide information on the options and features currently available to Canadians to manage unwanted spoofed and unsolicited calls. A summary list of over 200 features and options is currently available to help Canadians protect themselves from unsolicited and illegitimate telemarketing calls was published.

Three-Year Outlook
Protect – Strengthening the security and safety of Canadians within the communications system

PROTECT
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19

Next generation 9-1-1 servicesFootnote 9
The CRTC will initiate an examination of next generation 9-1-1 services in Canada to explore other means by which Canadians could request and receive emergency assistance, such as text, video and images.

The CRTC will undertake, by means of a public hearing, an examination of next-generation 9-1-1 services in Canada including the roles and responsibilities of telecommunications service providers.

The CRTC will issue a decision, implement new measures, if any, and initiate follow-up proceedings, as required, following the decision. The CRTC will continue to implement new measures, if any, as well as monitor their effectiveness.

Reliability and resiliency of 9-1-1 networkFootnote 10
The CRTC is conducting a review of the reliability and resiliency of 9-1-1 networks across Canada to determine, among other things, whether telecommunications service providers should be required to alert 9-1-1 call centres of network outages that may affect them.

The CRTC will issue a decision related to the resiliency and reliability of 9-1-1 networks in Canada and implement new measures, if any, following the decision.

The CRTC will monitor the effectiveness of new regulatory measures, if any. The CRTC will monitor the effectiveness of new regulatory measures, if any.

Broadcast emergency alertingFootnote 11
The CRTC will conduct compliance oversight for campus, community, Native and radio distribution undertakings, which are required to be compliant by 31 March 2016. The CRTC will continue to monitor the participation by the broadcasting industry in the alerting system.

It will also monitor any system improvements put in place by the system operator.

The CRTC will continue to monitor the participation of all broadcasters in the alerting system.

The CRTC will monitor technology developments that may contribute to improvements in the distribution of alerts to Canadians.

The CRTC will consider renewing the licence of Pelmorex, the operator of the National Alert Aggregation and Dissemination System.

The CRTC will monitor and report on the participation of all broadcasters in the alerting system on an annual basis.

The CRTC will monitor technology developments that may contribute to improvements in the distribution of alerts to Canadians.

newWireless emergency alerting
The CRTC will monitor the implementation of the Wireless Public Alerting System (WPAS) pilot project, which is being co-ordinated and funded by Public Safety Canada.

The CRTC will complete a public consultation to consider the implementation of emergency alerting by the wireless industry, including establishing policy guidelines and implementing timeframes for industry compliance, as necessary.

The CRTC will monitor the participation of wireless carriers in the alerting system, as determined by any policy decision.

The CRTC will continue to monitor wireless industry developments with respect to the WPAS, as well as monitor technological developments in the area of alerting for future opportunities to expand and/or enhance the system.

The CRTC will monitor the participation of wireless carriers in the alerting system. It will also continue to monitor technological developments in the area of alerting for future opportunities to expand and/or enhance the system.
Enforcement intelligenceFootnote 12
The CRTC will continue to develop its capacity to collect and analyze information from diverse sources and derive intelligence to support investigations of non-compliance with Canada’s Anti-Spam Legislation (CASL), the Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules (UTRs) and the requirements of the Voter Contact Registry (VCR). A risk-assessment model for intelligence will be developed to more rigorously identify, evaluate and address risks of non-compliance and support enforcement actions on high-impact cases.
Using a risk-assessment model for intelligence, the CRTC will pursue additional information sources and improve information sharing with domestic and international partners to further its understanding of emerging areas or activities of concern. The CRTC will review and update the application of its risk-assessment model for intelligence to identify new and emerging trends, which will result in expanding its information sources and further strengthening its focus on high-risk issues.

Unsolicited communications - Compliance and enforcementFootnote 13
The CRTC will continue to promote and enforce compliance with the UTRs, CASL and the VCR.

In 2016-17, the CRTC will strengthen these activities by building new and leveraging existing domestic and international partnerships to exchange information and collaborate on enforcement responses.

In response to changes in the telemarketing marketplace and to facilitate complaints by Canadians, the National DNCL complaint form will be improved. Information gathered from Canadian businesses through public opinion research will be analyzed to further refine compliance promotion activities.

The CRTC will continue to promote and enforce compliance with the UTRs, CASL and the VCR.

In 2017-18, the selection of cases will be strengthened through the integration of a risk-based intelligence model.

Timely enforcement advisories will continue to be issued to inform Canadians about emerging issues, together with publication of guidance for businesses to promote compliance.

The CRTC will continue to promote and enforce compliance with the UTRs, CASL and the VCR.

In 2018-19, the CRTC’s enforcement of CASL will be adjusted as required, following a planned review of the legislation.

Empowering Canadians to protect themselves from unsolicited and illegitimate telemarketing callsFootnote 14
Following a public consultation in 2015-16, the CRTC will publish guidance to empower Canadians to better protect themselves from unsolicited and illegitimate calls, including those that use illegitimate caller ID spoofing.

The CRTC will foster the deployment by industry of technical solutions to reduce unsolicited and illegitimate calls.

The CRTC will collaborate with industry to trial new technical solutions to enhance Canadians’ trust in caller ID and enable user-reporting on the media on which the call is received.

The CRTC will monitor and report on the implementation of technical solutions by industry to reduce unsolicited and illegitimate calls and consider further measures, as required, to address gaps in their availability to Canadians and effectiveness. Based on the results of the trial, the CRTC will foster the national deployment of new caller ID authentication and user-reporting solutions. The CRTC will continue to monitor the deployment of technical solutions to assess their availability and effectiveness.
newNational Do Not Call List Operator
The CRTC will implement plans to ensure the ongoing operation of the National DNCL, including the issuance of a Request for Proposals for a National DNCL Operator. As required, it will then evaluate proposals received and negotiate a contract for that purpose.
The CRTC will award and manage the contract for the National DNCL Operator, to be in place by January 2018. The CRTC will monitor the roll out of the National DNCL Operator’s activities, including adherence to requirements of the new contract.
Voter Contact Registry
The CRTC will conduct an assessment of the implementation and performance of the VCR.
Improvements to the VCR program will be implemented, as required. The CRTC will monitor the performance of VCR program during federal election events.

Television Service Provider Code for ConsumersFootnote 15
The CRTC will implement the Television Service Provider (TVSP) Code via amendments to each company’s conditions of licence.

The CRTC will monitor the implementation and compliance of applicable companies with the TVSP Code.

The CRTC will implement the TVSP Code via amendments to each company’s conditions of licence.

The CRTC will monitor the implementation and compliance of applicable companies with the TVSP Code.

The CRTC will monitor the implementation and compliance of applicable companies with the TVSP Code.

Wireless Code
The CRTC will publish the third year of Wireless Code public opinion research survey results.

The CRTC will initiate a public consultation to review the Wireless Code to ensure its effectiveness in fulfilling its objectives.

The CRTC will issue a decision regarding its regulatory policy framework and the Wireless Code.

The CRTC will monitor compliance with the Wireless Code.

The CRTC will monitor compliance with the Wireless Code.
Commissioner for Complaints for Telecommunications Services review
The CRTC will monitor the effectiveness of the Commissioner for Complaints for Telecommunications Services (CCTS) in fulfilling its expanded mandate, including its new role as the ombudsman for complaints about TVSP services.
The CRTC will monitor effectiveness of the CCTS in fulfilling its expanded mandate.  

Loudness of TV commercial messagesFootnote 16
The CRTC will conduct an internal review of its current policy on compliance with and enforcement of the loudness of commercials.

The CRTC will keep abreast of technological developments to measure and control the loudness of television messages to ensure that the CRTC is able to effectively monitor and enforce full industry compliance with the regulatory requirements.

The CRTC will continue to review and assess industry responses to consumer complaints and undertake targeted monitoring, as necessary, of the loudness of television commercials based on consumer complaints.

Following the internal review, the CRTC may initiate a review of the current policy.

The CRTC will keep abreast of technological developments to measure and control the loudness of television messages to ensure that it is able to effectively monitor and enforce full industry compliance with the regulatory requirements.

The CRTC will continue to review and assess industry responses to consumer complaints and undertake targeted monitoring, as necessary, of the loudness of television commercials based on consumer complaints.

The CRTC will keep abreast of technological developments to measure and control the loudness of television messages to ensure that it is able to effectively monitor and enforce full industry compliance with the regulatory requirements.

The CRTC will continue to review and assess industry responses to consumer complaints and undertake targeted monitoring, as necessary, of the loudness of television commercials based on consumer complaints.

newPrivacy
The transition from traditional communications to digitized services that are delivered over the Internet or mobile networks have raised various privacy concerns. Accordingly, the CRTC will conduct research on privacy issues raised in this new environment within the context of its regulatory policy.
Based on the results of the research, a public consultation may be initiated to consider the effectiveness of the CRTC’s privacy regulatory policy.  

Highlights of 2015-16 Activities
Management ExcellenceBuilding a high-performing organization

Activities that the CRTC commited to for 2015-16 in the CRTC Three-Year Plan 2015-2018 that are completedFinancial systems

All high and medium internal control risks identified by Deloitte in 2013 have been addressed with the exception of the payroll portion of the government-wide “Transformation of Pay Administration” initiative. Implementation of remedial action is contingent on Public Services and Procurement Canada’s (PSPC) rollout of the new system, which is expected to occur in 2015-2016. Remedial activities on low-risk processes continue.

Activities that the CRTC commited to for 2015-16 in the CRTC Three-Year Plan 2015-2018 that are completedEmployee development

The CRTC launched a training portal for Compliance and Enforcement employees, in partnership with the non-profit Canadian Police Knowledge Network, to provide them with on-demand access to the training materials they require to perform their duties.

Activities that the CRTC commited to for 2015-16 in the CRTC Three-Year Plan 2015-2018 that are completedIndustry monitoring and reporting

This year, the CRTC made a number of data additions in the Communications Monitoring Report (CMR). Among the new data was the number of publicly available Wi-Fi hotspots across Canada, the volume of machine-to-machine connections, the rate of adoption for various wireless plans, new video-on-demand data, as well as enhanced, disaggregated data for multicultural radio by province. Other changes include the addition of wholesale cable and digital subscriber line data, as well as wholesale revenues for local service by province. Finally, the new report better distinguishes between the English and French markets and provides a more fulsome portrait of online video services.

Activities that the CRTC commited to for 2015-16 in the CRTC Three-Year Plan 2015-2018 that are completedOutreach and collaboration

In June 2015, the CRTC and the Canadian Communication Association (CCA) jointly launched the CRTC Prize for Excellence in Policy Research at the CCA annual meeting in Ottawa. In joining with the CCA to create this prize, the CRTC is continuing to build bridges with the university community. The initiative is a way to enrich the discussion and encourage a new generation of researchers, with the potential to contribute to Canadian information and communications policy. The first recipients will be announced at the Spring 2016 CCA annual meeting.

The CRTC worked on a Classroom Ambassador Project with the Ontario College of Art and Design University on environmental scanning of new media trends and issues. It also collaborated with Ryerson University organizing a student policy Design Jam on the discoverability of content in the age of abundance.  The policy issues discussed at the Jam will complement themes that are in development for the International Summit on Discoverability being hosted by the CRTC in May 2016 with the National Film Board.

Activities that the CRTC commited to for 2015-16 in the CRTC Three-Year Plan 2015-2018 that are completedOpen Data

The CRTC launched the Open Data Project, along with the release of the pilot datasets, via the Government of Canada’s Open Data Portal. These datasets included the tables on television viewing and ownership statistics (select tables from the CMR, commercial television statistical and financial summaries, broadcasting financial summaries on pay, pay-per-view, video-on-demand and specialty services, as well as general tariff exchanges).

Activities that the CRTC commited to for 2015-16 in the CRTC Three-Year Plan 2015-2018 that are ongoingInternational activities
To support its enforcement actions, the CRTC became an associate member of the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police and created a partnership with the Forensic Accounting Management Group of PSPC. A CRTC representative attended joint meetings with the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Federal Trade Commission, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Indian law enforcement and the Data Security Council of India, which resulted in the creation of a new partnership to develop and explore options to take action against call centres in India that are violating the Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules. Representatives also actively participated in international forums, including the Messaging Mobile Malware Anti-Abuse Working Group (M3AAWG), M3AAWG’s Voice Telephony Abuse Special Interest Group and the London Action Plan. Active participation in the London Action Plan, as a member of the new Executive Committee, established a role for a CRTC representative as liaison to Interpol/Europol/RCMP.

The CRTC conducted comparative policy research that supported its proceedings and policy-making. The Commission has continued to expand and enhance its relationships with international counterparts and leverage best practices from other jurisdictions through outreach and collaboration with regulators in other jurisdictions, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and the International Institute of Communications.

Three-Year Outlook
Management Excellence – Building a high-performing organization

MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19

Engage and inform CanadiansFootnote 17
The CRTC will present current information on its website and social media platforms that is relevant to Canadians.

The CRTC will simplify its Intervention/Comment form to facilitate participation by Canadians who are not familiar with the CRTC.

The CRTC will evaluate its digital engagement channels (discussion forum, Client Experience Design, online chat and complaint, YouTube, Facebook, Twitter) and explore new possibilities to meet its objectives to engage and inform Canadians (e.g. LinkedIn).

The CRTC will continue to evaluate and make adjustments to its strategy based on the current digital environment. The CRTC will continue to evaluate and make adjustments to its strategy based on the current digital environment.

Industry monitoring and reporting
The CRTC will continue to collect relevant data from the communications industry via the Data Collection System (DCS).

The CRTC will develop a plan to enhance the DCS to further facilitate the online filing of broadcasting and telecommunications data by external users.

The CRTC will continue to analyze and make available reliable data on the communications industry for its internal processes, its partners and Canadians.

Reports will include the Communications Monitoring Report (CMR), broadcasting financial summaries and aggregate returns. Based on feedback from internal and external stakeholders, the CMR will include new data in the Telecommunications section.

Analytical fact sheets will be developed and published as a companion tool to the broadcasting financial summaries to offer a more user-friendly and accessible summary of the financial performance of the industry.

The CRTC will continue to collect relevant data from the communications industry via the DCS.

The CRTC will implement enhancements to the DCS to further facilitate the online filing of broadcasting and telecommunications data by external users.

The CRTC will continue to analyze and make available reliable data on the communications industry for its internal processes, its partners and Canadians.

Reports will include the CMR, broadcasting financial summaries and aggregate returns.

Analytical fact sheets will be developed and published as a companion tool to the broadcasting financial summaries to offer a more user-friendly and accessible summary of the financial performance of the industry.

The CRTC will continue to collect relevant data from the communications industry via its web-based data collection system.

The CRTC will evaluate the progress made in the enhancements made to the DCS.

The CRTC will continue to analyze and make available reliable data on the communications industry for its internal processes, its partners and Canadians.

Reports will include the CMR, broadcasting financial summaries and aggregate returns.

Analytical fact sheets will be developed and published as a companion tool to the broadcasting financial summaries to offer a more user-friendly and accessible summary of the financial performance of the industry.

Strategic planning and reportingFootnote 18
The CRTC will set priorities and remain accountable to parliamentarians and the Canadian public through a variety of activities, including environmental scanning, risk management, senior management planning and priority setting retreats, as well as mid-year reviews, and by developing reports such as the Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP), Departmental Performance Report (DPR), the Three-Year Plan (3YP) and the Corporate Risk Profile.

The CRTC will maintain a continuous improvement cycle that builds on previous successes to advance planning and reporting products.

The CRTC will set priorities and remain accountable to parliamentarians and the Canadian public through a variety of activities, including environmental scanning, risk management, senior management planning and priority setting retreats, as well as mid-year reviews, and by developing reports such as the RPP, DPR, the 3YP and the Corporate Risk Profile.

The CRTC will maintain a continuous improvement cycle that builds on previous successes to advance planning and reporting products.

The CRTC will set priorities and remain accountable to parliamentarians and the Canadian public through a variety of activities, including environmental scanning, risk management, senior management planning and priority setting retreats, as well as mid-year reviews, and by developing reports such as the RPP, DPR, the 3YP and the Corporate Risk Profile.

The CRTC will maintain a continuous improvement cycle that builds on previous successes to advance planning and reporting products.

Outreach and collaboration
The CRTC will continue to collaborate with Canadian and international government departments and agencies, including regulators in other jurisdictions, as well as non-government organizations, working groups and academia on strategic research and forward-looking activities.

The CRTC will continue working on a variety of initiatives and special projects with universities and student groups to examine policy issues related to the discoverability of content in the age of abundance.

In collaborative partnership with the Canadian Communications Association (CCA), an independent, peer review process for the CRTC Academic Prize for Excellence in Policy Research will begin in Winter 2016, and winners will be announced at the CCA annual conference in May 2016.

The CRTC will continue to reach out to Canadian and international government departments and agencies, non-government organizations, working groups and academia on strategic research and related initiatives to strength communication and continue to develop strategic international and domestic partnerships.

The CRTC will continue to collaborate with the CCA to stimulate academic research in the field of communications policy, as well as research activities conducted by the International Telecommunications Union (ITU), the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and the International Institute of Communications (IIC).

The CRTC will also continue to conduct comparative policy research to support current proceedings and policy-making.

The CRTC will continue to reach out to Canadian and international government departments and agencies, non-government organizations, working groups and academia on strategic research and related initiatives to strength communication and continue to develop strategic international and domestic partnerships.

The CRTC will continue to collaborate with the CCA to stimulate academic research in the field of communications policy, as well as research activities conducted by the ITU, the OECD and the IIC.

The CRTC will also continue to conduct comparative policy research to support current proceedings and policy-making.

International activities
The CRTC will expand its engagement with international partners, counterparts and law‑enforcement agencies to support its approach to compliance and enforcement in the face of transnational violations of Canada’s Anti-Spam Legislations and the Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules.

The CRTC will continue to collaborate with international government departments and agencies, including regulators in other jurisdictions, to ensure that our evidence-based policies are grounded in global best practices.

The CRTC will continue to develop strategic international and domestic partnerships and engage with the ITU, the OECD and the IIC in research and policy development activities. These partnerships will also support comparative policy research, ensuring that the CRTC is in line with a rapidly evolving communication environment that transcends national borders.

The CRTC will continue to collaborate in activities conducted by the ITU, the OECD and the IIC.

The CRTC will also continue to conduct comparative policy research to support current proceedings and policy-making.

The CRTC will continue to collaborate in activities conducted by the ITU, the OECD and the IIC.

The CRTC will also continue to conduct comparative policy research to support current proceedings and policy-making.

CRTC Five-Year Investment PlanFootnote 19
The CRTC will develop the CRTC Five‑Year Investment Plan for the years 2016-17 to 2020-21.
   
newHuman Resources Management transformation
The CRTC will initiate a new Human Resources Management (HRM) service delivery model to identify and address corporate gaps through capacity building, organizational structure, user-friendly and easily accessible HR tools, learning, coaching, etc.
The CRTC will implement the HRM service delivery model and branch organizational structure. The CRTC will continue to evaluate the HRM service delivery model to ensure its success.

Employee development
Alignment of the Canada School of Public Service’s curriculum with that of the CRTC will be completed.

The CRTC employee development program will be completed.

Training materials for enforcement officers on the Canadian Police Knowledge Network portal will continue to be added to respond to the specific needs of the compliance and enforcement program.

Relief and knowledge transfer management models are in development.

The transformation of the CRTC’s human resources will take into account talent and career management in its approach to staffing.

Training materials for intelligence analysts will be developed and added to the Canadian Police Knowledge Network portal. 

Updates to and evaluations of training strategies, relief management and knowledge management will take place in light of lessons learned.

Training materials for enforcement officers and intelligence analysts will be reviewed and updated as required to ensure they remain current.

Open Data InitiativeFootnote 20
The CRTC will continue to implement the Open Data Initiative by launching additional datasets on the Government of Canada’s Open Data Portal.

The CRTC will finalize its Open Data Implementation Plan in accordance with the Treasury Board’s Directive on Open Government.

The CRTC will continue to implement the Open Data Initiative by launching additional datasets on the Government of Canada’s Open Data Portal.   The CRTC will continue to implement the Open Data Initiative by launching additional datasets on the Government of Canada’s Open Data Portal.  
newWeb Renewal Initiative
The CRTC is transitioning its website to Canada.ca in accordance with Treasury Board Secretariat guidelines.
The CRTC will continue to transition its website to Canada.ca. The CRTC has transitioned its website to Canada.ca.

Your Participation is Important

“The CRTC wants to put Canadians at the centre of their communication system. And that means making their voices heard and their opinions known.”

Jean-Pierre Blais, Chairman, CRTC

Have your say!

When it comes to shaping Canada’s broadcasting and telecommunications system, we depend on you to tell us what you want and need, and to let us know what is and isn’t working for you.

We encourage you to have your say. We invite you to join us in continuing to build a world-class communication system that meets your needs.

Why Your Participation Matters
That is why it is to your benefit to be aware of what we are doing and why. It is also to your benefit to play a role in determining the policies and regulations we develop and the actions we take. And that means making your voice heard and your opinions known to us.

We listen … and we act

Listening to you is critical for us. You point us in the right direction, and where we can, we address your concerns head on.

Participate in a public proceeding

We regularly conduct public proceedings, so that you can share your views on important issues in person, by videoconference, online, or in writing. To learn about upcoming proceedings and how you can participate, go to our website’s home page.

Join an online consultation

You can share your views by joining one of our online consultations that help us gather information on issues that directly impact you. Consult our website’s home page for upcoming consultations

Contact us

Contact us online - You’ll find a step-by-step online form for your questions and complaints at www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/contact/#complaint

Call us toll free at 1-877-249-CRTC (2782)

On a toll-free TTY line at 1-877-909-CRTC (2782)

Fax us at 819-994-0218

Send us a letter at CRTC, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0N2

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