Departmental Results Report 2016–2017

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

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The Honourable Mélanie Joly, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Canadian Heritage

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, as represented by the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, 2017

Catalogue No. BC9-27E-PDF

ISSN 2560-9971

Table of contents

Minister’s message

The Honourable Mélanie Joly

We are currently in the midst of a unique year: Canada 150. The organizations in the Canadian Heritage Portfolio—including the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC)—have spared no effort in 2016–17 to let Canadians across the country take part in the celebrations. Through their activities and projects, these organizations have invited us to reflect on the path we have travelled so far and to appreciate all we have achieved. They have also allowed us to look toward the future with confidence as we strive to make Canada successful in the digital era.

Modern communications are instrumental to full participation in Canada’s democratic and cultural life. As the regulator of Canada’s communication system, the CRTC seeks to ensure that all Canadians have access to a world-class communication system.

This year, the CRTC undertook extensive work to increase Canadians’ participation in the digital economy, boost access to local news and information, and improve privacy protection with respect to telemarketing and spam. It also enhanced its commitment to Net neutrality, consumer choice and the sharing of ideas.

As Minister of Canadian Heritage, I am proud to present the 2016–17 Departmental Results Report for the CRTC. The report will let you discover how the CRTC demonstrated innovation in fulfilling its mission, and in promoting our culture and our two official languages—while also making 2017 an unforgettable year.

The Honourable Mélanie Joly

Results at a glance

The CRTC’s total actual spending in 2016–17 was $59,076,634, and its total number of actual full-time equivalents was 460.

Key results achieved in 2016–17:

For more information on the department’s plans, priorities and results achieved, see the “Results: what we achieved” section of this report.

What funds were used?

59,076,634

Actual Spending

Who was involved?

460

Actual FTEs

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Raison d’être

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) is an administrative tribunal that regulates and supervises Canadian broadcasting and telecommunications in the public interest, as well as enhances the privacy and safety of Canadians.

Mandate and role

The CRTC's main responsibilities include the following:

Regulatory Policy, Legislative Implementation and Regulation

Outreach and Engagement with Stakeholders and Canadians

Monitoring, Compliance and Enforcement

In addition, the CRTC annually updates a Three-Year PlanEndnote i that details forecasted activities with respect to its three pillars: Create, Connect, and Protect.

The CRTC undertakes its responsibilities with a focus on Canadians-as citizens, creators and consumers. Canada’s communication system continues to evolve in a complex and dynamic manner, and is of growing importance to the lives of Canadians.

For more general information about the department, see the “Supplementary information” section of this report.

Operating context and key risks

Operating context

Broadband is vital. This was the conclusion reached by the CRTC in its landmark decision on the telecommunications services that should be considered “basic” in Canada. Broadband Internet access service is now the most significant pipeline for much of the world’s creative output, among countless other products, services and experiences. It has led to an ever-growing array of communications tools, services, and platforms, including the growing Internet of Things, and a global digital marketplace of abundant content choice. Today, citizenship itself is in many ways digital. As a result, demand for broadband Internet access service continues to grow, as do opportunities for malicious use of the technologies it enables. There are also significant gaps in access to broadband in Canada in terms of availability, affordability and digital literacy. The CRTC’s broadband-centric external environment is further characterized by new business models, a changing competitive landscape, and evolving consumer expectations and needs.

Key risks

In its 2016–17 Report on Plans and Priorities, the CRTC identified three key risks to its ability to fully serve the public interest and meet the expectations of Canadians:

Throughout 2016–17, the CRTC took significant steps toward mitigating these risks.

Seizing the opportunities created by digital disruption, the CRTC modernized its regulatory policy framework in important ways, chief among them its introduction of a new Universal Service Objective and broadband infrastructure funding regime.Endnote ii It also directed wireless service providers to implement a wireless public alerting system by April 2018,Endnote iii and issued a revised policy on local and community televisionEndnote iv to ensure that Canadians continue to have access to local programming that reflects their needs and interests. The CRTC also conducted an extensive public consultation process that concluded, in April 2017, with the introduction of a new regulatory framework for the differential pricing practices of Internet service providers.Endnote v

To help ensure that it meets its strategic objectives, the CRTC continued to develop its policy research and development capacity through knowledge partnerships, international events, and continuous dialogue with Canadian citizens, creators, service providers, academia and other stakeholders. These include

These partnerships help preserve and enhance the CRTC’s capacity to continue driving the digital agenda. They enable the CRTC to gather intelligence, exchange best practices with experts in the field, monitor trends and help ensure that the organization’s collective reasoning keeps pace with the changing realities of the external environment.

Finally, to help ensure that the skills of the CRTC’s workforce respond to present and future needs, the CRTC implemented a new human resources service model to better meet the forward-looking resource and knowledge needs of the organization.

Key risks
Risks Mitigating strategy and effectiveness Link to the organization’s Programs Link to mandate letter commitmentsFootnote 1 or to government-wide and departmental priorities

The CRTC may not be able to ensure that a wealth of Canadian content is created and that Canadians have a choice of affordable quality communications services.

  • The CRTC continued to monitor and strategically analyze market conditions and technological developments in order to advance regulatory policies.
  • The CRTC engaged in continuous dialogue with Canadians, creators and service providers to identify and analyze trends.
  • The CRTC continued to collaborate with external stakeholders on the promotion of programming made by Canadians.

1.1 Canadian Content Creation

1.2 Connection to the Communication System

Program 1, Priority 1: Compelling and Diverse Content in a Digital World

Program 2, Priority 1: Empowering Canadians to Participate in the Digital Economy

The CRTC may not be able to anticipate and effectively respond to Canadians’ privacy, security and safety needs within the communication system.

  • The CRTC continued to enhance its collaborative efforts with key international and domestic organizations to strengthen its protection mechanisms.
  • The CRTC focused its enforcement efforts using an intelligence-led approach, and publicized high impact cases to protect Canadians and promote compliance.
  • The CRTC enhanced public awareness so that Canadians can protect themselves within the communication system.
  • The CRTC proactively researched possible enhancements to 911 networks and evolved its regulations as appropriate.

1.3 Protection Within the Communication System

Program 3, Priority 1: Safety and Security in the Communication System

Results: what we achieved

Programs

Canadian Content Creation

Description

This program focuses on ensuring that a wealth of Canadian content is created and made available to all Canadians on a variety of platforms. Through its orders, decisions, licensing frameworks, and other regulatory activities, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) encourages the creation of diverse programming that reflects the attitudes, opinions, ideas, values, and artistic creativity of Canadians. By requiring the display of Canadian content in entertainment programming and the provision of information and analysis concerning Canada, the CRTC is enabling Canadians to better participate in their country’s democratic and cultural life.

Results

The CRTC measures the effectiveness of this Program by looking at the total spending on Canadian television production by independent production companies and private as well as public broadcasters (including the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC)/Radio-Canada), as measured annually by the Canadian Media Producers Association (CMPA) and published in “Profile,” its annual economic report on the screen-based production industry in Canada. In 2015–16, the most recent year for which data is available, this spending was $2.6 billion. This result is the same as spending for the prior year and meets the CRTC’s target of $2.6 billion.

The effectiveness of this Program is also indicated by the following measures:

The 2016–17 Report on Plans and Priorities stated that the CRTC would undertake a number of activities to encourage investment in the production and promotion of Canadian programming. In fulfillment of these commitments, the CRTC

Through a variety of radio and television licensing decisions, the CRTC also continued to ensure the availability of a broad range of programming reflecting the diversity of Canadians (linguistically, geographically, culturally and demographically). Notably, it held a public hearing for applications for radio licences that would better serve urban Aboriginal communitiesEndnote xv in several large Canadian markets, underlining the important role played by the broadcasting system in advancing reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples. The subsequent licensing decisions were issued in 2017–18.

Results achieved
Expected
results
Performance
indicators
Target Date to
achieve
target
2016–17
Actual
results
2015–16
Actual
results
2014–15
Actual
results
The broadcasting system provides Canadians with a wealth of Canadian programming Total spending on Canadian television programming projects $2.6 billion March 31 $2.6 billionFootnote 3 $2.6 billion $2.3 billion
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
- 2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned
spending
2016–17
Total authorities
available for
use
2016–17
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–17
Difference
(actual minus planned)
Gross expenditures 15,102,446 15,102,446 15,451,184 15,225,035 122,589
Respendable revenue 13,116,212 13,116,212 13,116,212 13,116,212 0
Net expenditures 1,986,234 1,986,234 2,334,972 2,108,823 122,589
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–17
Planned
2016–17
Actual
2016–17
Difference
(actual minus planned)
115 115 0

Connection to the Communication System

Description

The CRTC facilitates the orderly development of a communication system for all Canadians in order to strengthen the social and economic fabric of Canada and enhance the safety and interests of Canadians. This program focuses on ensuring that Canadians can connect to a choice of accessible, innovative, and quality communication services at affordable prices, and thereby have access to, amongst other things, compelling and creative Canadian programming.

Results

The CRTC measures the effectiveness of this Program by the percentage of retail telecommunications service revenues from competitive markets. (“Competitive markets” are defined as areas where the CRTC has forborne from regulation, having found that a service is subject to sufficient competition that the interests of users are protected, or where refraining from regulation is consistent with the Canadian telecommunications policy objectives.Endnote xvi) In 2016–17, this measure was 97%, which exceeds the CRTC’s 94% target and demonstrates that most Canadians throughout the country have a meaningful choice of telecommunications service providers.

In 2016–17, the CRTC issued a landmark decisionEndnote xvii establishing an ambitious new Universal Service Objective for telecommunications services. It also established criteria to measure the successful achievement of this objective and, to provide financial support in areas that do not meet the criteria, committed to creating a new broadband infrastructure funding regime.

As also anticipated in the 2016–17 Report on Plans and Priorities, the CRTC did the following:

The CRTC also undertook the following additional regulatory activities:

As the result of CRTC decisions made in previous years, video relay serviceEndnote xxviii was launched in Canada in September 2016, enabling Canadian speakers of American Sign Language or Langue des signes québécoise to more fully participate in Canada’s communication system.

Finally, to help consumers find communications service providers and negotiate better prices, the CRTC launched two new online information resources: “Service Providers Near MeEndnote xxix and “You Have Choices. Demand Better.”Endnote xxx To further empower consumers, the CRTC put in place measures to increase the visibility of the Commissioner for Complaints for Telecommunications Services and promoted the use of websites that compare service providers’ offerings.Endnote xxxi

Results achieved
Expected
results
Performance
indicators
Target Date to
achieve
target
2016–17
Actual
results
2015–16
Actual
results
2014–15
Actual
results
The communications system provides quality and affordable communication service options to Canadians Percentage of retail telecommunication revenues from competitive markets 94% March 31 97%Footnote 4 96.6% 95%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
- 2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned
spending
2016–17
Total authorities
available for
use
2016–17
Actual spending
(authorities
used)
2016–17
Difference
(actual minus
planned)
Gross expenditures 19,726,258 19,726,258 20,066,926 17,827,785 -1,898,473
Respendable revenue 17,184,045 17,184,045 17,184,045 17,184,045 0
Net expenditures 2,542,213 2,542,213 2,882,881 643,740 -1,898,473
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–17
Planned
2016–17
Actual
2016–17
Difference
(actual minus planned)
148 133 -15

Protection within the Communication System

Description

Through this program, the CRTC promotes compliance with and enforcement of its various laws and regulations, including unsolicited communications. It helps to ensure that Canadians have access to emergency communication services such as 9-1-1 service and alerting systems. As a result, Canadians have increased protection and benefit from a more secure communication system.

Results

The CRTC currently assesses the effectiveness of this Program by the percentage of Canadians who consider that the CRTC is taking measures to enhance their safety and protection in the communication system. In a 2017 survey by Environics Research, the result was 60%. This figure exceeds the target of 50% but was slightly less than the 66% response in the 2015 survey.

In 2016–17, the CRTC took the following regulatory actions:

Using intelligence-led case selection and investigations, the CRTC took several enforcement actions,Endnote xxxvii including issuing warning letters, citations, administrative monetary penalties, undertakings and notices of violation, to bring entities in violation into compliance.

It also took a number of other important actions:

Results achieved
Expected
results
Performance
indicators
Target Date to
achieve
target
2016–17
Actual
results
2015–16
Actual
results
2014–15
Actual
results
Canadian communication services contribute to the protection and safety of Canadians Percentage of Canadians who consider that the CRTC is taking measures to enhance their safety and protection in the communication system 50% March 31 60%Footnote 5 66%Footnote 6 66%Footnote 7
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
- 2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned
spending
2016–17
Total authorities
available for
use
2016–17
Actual spending
(authorities
used)
2016–17
Difference
(actual minus
planned)
Gross expenditures 11,107,795 11,107,795 11,377,270 11,183,621 75,826
Respendable revenue 5,955,790 5,955,790 5,955,790 5,955,790 0
Net expenditures 5,152,005 5,152,005 5,421,480 5,227,831 75,826
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–17
Planned
2016–17
Actual
2016–17
Difference
(actual minus planned)
83 83 0

Information on the CRTC’s lower-level programs is available on TBS InfoBase.Endnote xxxviii

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Results

In fulfillment of its commitments in the 2016–17 Report on Plans and Priorities, the CRTC took the following actions:

In accordance with the Federal Public Service Workplace Mental Health Strategy, the CRTC took steps to build a healthy, respectful and supportive work environment. It held sessions to raise awareness of mental health in the workplace, appointed a champion to promote positive mental health, provided training to managers to help them respond to issues and incidents related to mental health, and liaised with other federal departments to identify best practices and tools.

Lastly, as part of its commemoration project to celebrate Canada’s 150th anniversary, the CRTC recognized 23 exceptional men and womenEndnote xlii for their contribution to the Canadian communication system by giving their names to the Commission’s meeting rooms.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
- 2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned
spending
2016–17
Total authorities
available for
use
2016–17
Actual spending
(authorities
used)
2016–17
Difference
(actual minus
planned)
Gross expenditures 13,872,284 13,872,284 14,859,318 14,840,193 967,909
Respendable revenue 11,429,041 11,429,041 11,429,041 11,429,041 0
Net expenditures 2,443,243 2,443,243 3,430,277 3,411,152 967,909
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–17
Planned
2016–17
Actual
2016–17
Difference
(actual minus planned)
119 129 10

Analysis of trends in spending and human resources

Actual expenditures

Departmental spending trend graph
 The table presented below provides the total spending trends (i.e. actual and planned spending) for fiscal years 2014-15 to 2019-20 and are as follows: Voted and vote-netted revenue: $51,305,497 for 2014-15; $51,289,134 for 2015-16; $52,844,564 for 2016-17; $52,785,701 for 2017-18 and $52,785,701 for 2018-19 and 2019-20; Statutory: $6,462,883 for 2014-15; $6,415,197 for 2015-16; $6,232,070 for 2016-17; $6,445,602 for 2017-18 and $6,445,602 for 2018-19 and 2019-20; Total operating budget: $57,768,380 for 2014-15; $57,704,331 for 2015-16; $59,076,634 for 2016-17; $59,231,303 for 2017-18 and $59,231,303 for 2018-19 and 2019-20.
Table version
- 2014–15 2015–16 2016–17 2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
Sunset Programs - Anticipated 0 0 0 0 0 0
Statutory 6,462,883 6,415,197 6,232,070 6,445,602 6,445,602 6,455,602
Voted and Vote-netted revenue 51,305,497 51,289,134 52,844,564 52,785,701 52,785,701 52,785,701
Total 57,768,380 57,704,331 59,076,634 59,231,303 59,231,303 59,231,303

Total spending pertains to expenditures incurred by the CRTC in relation to all funding authorities approved during the fiscal year. Funding authorities include all Parliamentary appropriations and revenue sources: Main Estimates, Supplementary Estimates, Treasury Board Vote transfers (including the operating budget carry-forward), and revenues from Part I broadcasting licence fees, telecommunications fees and unsolicited telecommunications fees.

For fiscal years 2014–15 to 2016–17, actual spending represents the actual expenditures as reported in the Public Accounts of Canada. For the period from 2017–18 to 2019–20, the planned spending reflects funding approved by Treasury Board to support the CRTC’s programs.

Budgetary performance summary for Programs and Internal Services (dollars)
Programs and
Internal
Services
2016–17
Main
Estimates
2016–17
Planned
spending
2017–18
Planned
spending
2018–19
Planned
spending
2016–17
Total
authorities
available for
use
2016–17
Actual
spending
(authorities
used)
(Note 1)
2015–16
Actual
spending
(authorities
used)
(Note 1)
2014–15
Actual
spending
(authorities
used)
(Note 1)
Canadian Content Creation 15,102,446 15,102,446 15,205,244 15,205,244 15,451,184 15,225,035 14,854,316 15,249,755
Connection to the Communication System 19,726,258 19,726,258 19,570,717 19,570,717 20,066,926 17,827,785 18,454,821 18,042,288
Protection within the Communication System 11,107,795 11,107,795 10,677,018 10,677,018 11,377,270 11,183,621 10,387,641 10,458,959
Subtotal 45,936,499 45,936,499 45,452,979 45,452,979 46,895,380 44,236,441 43,696,778 43,751,002
Internal Services 13,872,284 13,872,284 13,778,324 13,778,324 14,859,318 14,840,193 14,007,553 14,017,378
Total 59,808,783 59,808,783 59,231,303 59,231,303 61,754,698 59,076,634 57,704,331 57,768,380
Respendable revenue 47,685,088 47,685,088 47,745,106 47,745,106 47,685,088 47,685,088 46,705,914 46,322,218
Total net expenditures 12,123,695 12,123,695 11,486,197 11,486,197 14,069,610 11,391,546 10,998,417 11,446,162

Note 1: Actual spending reflects gross expenditures which include respendable revenues.

The increase between 2015–16 and 2016–17 actual spending is mainly due to the following:

Projected spending for fiscal years 2017–18 to 2018–19 corresponds to the planned spending level approved in the Main Estimates. At this time, there are no incremental amounts approved above the Main Estimates levels. Supplementary funding for items such as salary adjustments for new collective agreements and carry-forward adjustments are unknown at this time and are therefore not reflected. The planned level of spending for each of 2017–18 and 2018–19 remains similar to spending in 2016–17.

In 2016–17, the CRTC used its entire vote-netted revenue authority (respendable revenue). The situation could continue in the coming fiscal years.

Actual human resources

Human resources summary for Programs and Internal Services
(full-time equivalents)
Programs and
Internal Services
2014–15
Actual
2015–16
Actual
2016–17
Planned
2016–17
Actual
2017–18
Planned
2018–19
Planned
Canadian Content Creation 115 118 115 115 112 112
Connection to the Communication System 135 139 148 133 147 147
Protection within the Communication System 76 80 83 83 83 83
Subtotal 326 337 346 331 342 342
Internal Services 119 113 119 129 133 133
Total 445 450 465 460 475 475

The increase in full-time equivalents between fiscal years 2015–16 and 2016–17 is mainly due to the finalization of collective staffing and human resources transformation that has resulted in new hires.

Expenditures by vote

For information on the CRTC’s organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2017.Endnote xliii

Alignment of spending with the whole-of-government framework

Alignment of 2016—17 actual spending with the whole-of-government frameworkEndnote xliv (dollars)
Program Spending area Government of Canada activity 2016–17 Actual spending
Canadian Content Creation Social Affairs A vibrant Canadian culture and heritage 15,225,035
Connection to the Communication System Economic Affairs A fair and secure marketplace 17,827,785
Protection within the Communication System Social Affairs A safe and secure Canada 11,183,621
Total spending by spending area (dollars)
Spending area Total planned spending Total actual spending
Economic affairs 19,726,258 17,827,785
Social affairs 26,210,241 26,408,656
International affairs 0 0
Government affairs 0 0

Financial statements and financial statements highlights

Financial statements

The CRTC’s financial statements [unaudited] for the year ended March 31, 2017, are available on the CRTC’s website.Endnote xlv

As required by the Policy on Internal Control, the Core Control Audit ReportEndnote xlvi and Management Action PlanEndnote xlvii are posted on the CRTC’s website since the audit was conducted by the Office of the Comptroller General of Canada in 2016–17.

Financial statements highlights

Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2017 (dollars)
Financial information 2016–17
Planned
results
2016–17
Actual
2015–16
Actual
Difference
(2016–17
actual minus
2016–17
planned)
Difference
(2016–17
actual minus
2015–16
actual)
Total expenses 67,657,000 64,769,000 64,449,000 -2,888,000 320,000
Total revenues 47,685,000 47,685,000 46,706,000 0 979,000
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 19,972,000 17,084,000 17,743,000 -2,888,000 -659,000

Note: These figures are net departmental revenues and do not include the revenues collected on behalf of the Government of Canada, which totalled $124 million for 2016–17.

Revenues

Revenues collected in 2016–17 totalled $171.7 million ($124 million + $47.7 million), a net increase of $0.2 million when compared to the total revenues collected in 2015–16. The increase is mainly attributable to an increase in the Part II broadcasting licence fees.

Expenses

Expenses in 2016–17 totalled $64.8 million, an increase of $0.3 million when compared to 2015–16 total expenses.

Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited) as at March 31, 2017 (dollars)
Financial Information 2016–17 2015–16 Difference
(2016–17 minus
2015–16)
Total net liabilities 9,843,000 10,058,000 -215,000
Total net financial assets 6,015,000 5,609,000 406,000
Departmental net debt 3,828,000 4,449,000 -621,000
Total non-financial assets 3,140,000 3,068,000 72,000
Departmental net financial position -688,000 -1,381,000 693,000

Assets

Assets in 2016–17 totalled $9.2 million, a net increase of $0.5 million when compared to 2015–16 total assets. The increase is mainly attributable to an increase in accounts receivable and advances.

Liabilities

Liabilities in 2016–17 totalled $9.8 million, a decrease of $0.2 million when compared to 2015–16 total liabilities. The decrease is mainly attributable to a decrease in employees’ future benefits.

Supplementary information

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister:
Institutional head:
Ministerial portfolio:
Enabling instruments:
Year of incorporation / commencement:

Reporting framework

The CRTC’s Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture of record for 2016–17 are shown below.

  1. 1. Strategic Outcome: Canadians have access to a world-class communication system
    1. 1.1 Program: Canadian Content Creation
      1. 1.1.1 Sub-Program: Diverse Canadian Content
      2. 1.1.2 Sub-Program: Compelling Canadian Content
    2. 1.2 Program: Connection to the Communication System
      1. 1.2.1 Sub Program: Quality Communication Services
      2. 1.2.2 Sub Program: Affordable Communication Services
    3. 1.3 Program: Protection Within the Communication System
      1. 1.3.1 Sub Program: Safety-Enhancing Communication Services
      2. 1.3.2 Sub Program: Unsolicited Commercial Communications
    4. Internal Services

Supporting information on lower-level programs

Supporting information on results, financial and human resources relating to the CRTC’s lower-level programs is available on TBS InfoBase.Endnote liv

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on the CRTC’s website:Endnote lv

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures.Endnote lix This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

CRTC Central Office

Les Terrasses de la Chaudière
Central Building
1 Promenade du Portage
Gatineau, Quebec J8X 4B1

or

Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0N2

CRTC telephone numbers

In Canada:
Toll-free: 1-877-249-CRTC (2782)
Toll-free TTY line: 1-877-909-CRTC (2782)

Outside Canada:
819-997-0313
TTY line: 819-994-0423

Fax: 819-994-0218

Website: http://www.crtc.gc.ca

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)

Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)

Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

Core Responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)

An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a Core Responsibility are reflected in one or more related Departmental Results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.

Departmental Plan (Plan ministériel)

Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated departments over a three-year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.

Departmental Result (résultat ministériel)

A Departmental Result represents the change or changes that the department seeks to influence. A Departmental Result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.

Departmental Result Indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)

A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a Departmental Result.

Departmental Results Framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)

Consists of the department’s Core Responsibilities, Departmental Results and Departmental Result Indicators.

Departmental Results Report (Rapport sur les résultats ministériels)

Provides information on the actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.

Evaluation (évaluation)

In the Government of Canada, the systematic and neutral collection and analysis of evidence to judge merit, worth or value. Evaluation informs decision making, improvements, innovation and accountability. Evaluations typically focus on programs, policies and priorities and examine

questions related to relevance, effectiveness and efficiency. Depending on user needs, however, evaluations can also examine other units, themes and issues, including alternatives to existing interventions. Evaluations generally employ social science research methods.

full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)

A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)

For the purpose of the 2017–18 Departmental Plan, government-wide priorities refers to those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and Opportunity.

horizontal initiatives (initiative horizontale)

An initiative where two or more federal organizations, through an approved funding agreement, work toward achieving clearly defined shared outcomes, and which has been designated (for example, by Cabinet or a central agency) as a horizontal initiative for managing and reporting purposes.

Management, Resources and Results Structure (Structure de la gestion, des ressources et des résultats)

A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization’s inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.

non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)

Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

performance (rendement)

What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.

performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)

A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)

The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.

planned spending (dépenses prévues)

For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.

plans (plans)

The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

priorities (priorité)

Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).

program (programme)

A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.

Program Alignment Architecture (architecture d’alignement des programmes)

A structured inventory of an organization’s programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.

results (résultat)

An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.

statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)

Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.

Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique)

A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.

sunset program (programme temporisé)

A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.

target (cible)

A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

voted expenditures (dépenses votées)

Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

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