Broadcasting Notice of Consultation CRTC 2019-379

PDF version

Ottawa, 25 November 2019

Public record: 1011-NOC2019-0379

Notice of hearing

25 May 2020
Gatineau, Quebec

Deadline for submission of interventions: 13 February 2020

Deadline for submission of the licensee’s replies: 28 February 2020

[Submit an intervention/comment/answer or view related documents]

The Commission will hold a hearing beginning on 25 May 2020 at 9 a.m. at the Conference Centre, Phase IV, 140 Promenade du Portage, Gatineau, Quebec.

Attend the hearing or listen to it online.

Introduction

  1. At a hearing to begin 25 May 2020 in Gatineau, Quebec, the Commission will consider the following applications by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation/Société Radio-Canada (the Corporation) to renew the broadcasting licences for its various English- and French-language audio and audio-visual programming services.Footnote 1
    Programming services Application number
    English-language audio services 2019-0280-0
    French-language audio services 2019-0279-2
    English-language audio-visual services 2019-0282-5
    French-language audio-visual services 2019-0281-7
  2. The procedures for filing interventions and for participating in this proceeding are set out at the end of this notice of consultation. The proceeding will also include a Facebook consultation period, during which the Commission invites Canadians to comment on specific questions related to the proceeding on the Renewal of the CBC’s licences Facebook Photo Album.
  3. The Facebook consultation will begin on 25 November 2019 at 11 a.m. EST and end on 9 December 2019 at 8 p.m. EST. All comments submitted must comply with the Commission’s Social Media Rules of Engagement. Following the Facebook consultation period, transcripts will be made available on the Commission’s website at www.crtc.gc.ca. Only text submissions will be included in the final public record; images and attachments will not. The comments received during the Facebook consultation will be made part of the record of this proceeding

Legislative framework relating to the Corporation

  1. The Canadian broadcasting system is comprised of the public, private and community elements that together contribute to the maintenance and enhancement of national identity and cultural sovereignty. The activities and programming provided by the Corporation form the national cornerstone of the public element and serve as a key source of information, enlightenment and entertainment for Canada’s diverse population across the country.
  2. The Corporation’s mandate is set out in the Broadcasting Act (the Act). Pursuant to section 3(1)(l) of the Act, in providing television and radio services incorporating a wide range of programming that informs, enlightens and entertains, the Corporation's programming should, as set out in section 3(1)(m):
    1. be predominantly and distinctively Canadian,
    2. reflect Canada and its regions to national and regional audiences, while serving the special needs of those regions,
    3. actively contribute to the flow and exchange of cultural expression,
    4. be in English and in French, reflecting the different needs and circumstances of each official language community, including the particular needs and circumstances of English and French linguistic minorities,
    5. strive to be of equivalent quality in English and in French,
    6. contribute to shared national consciousness and identity,
    7. be made available throughout Canada by the most appropriate and efficient means and as resources become available for the purpose, and
    8. reflect the multicultural and multiracial nature of Canada.
  3. In its operations, the Corporation must also take into account that English- and French-language broadcasting, “while sharing common aspects, operate under different conditions and may have different requirements” (section 3(1)(c) of the Act). Further, it must take into account that programming that reflects the Indigenous cultures of Canada “should be provided within the Canadian broadcasting system as resources become available for the purpose” (section 3(1)(o) of the Act).
  4. While the Corporation’s activities are conducted at arm’s length from Parliament, it remains accountable to all Canadians for its programming and other activities. As part of this accountability, the Commission currently ensures that the Corporation meets its mandate by imposing a variety of conditions of licence on its traditional broadcasting services and monitoring whether the Corporation has met these conditions through various means, such as public reporting requirements, the monitoring of program logs and the publication of financial data.

The Corporation’s new three-year strategic plan

  1. The Corporation provides, in English and in French, audio content through its radio services and audio-visual content through its main national television services, its national news services and a number of discretionary services. All of these traditional services operate under broadcasting licences issued by the Commission. The Corporation’s services for which the broadcasting licences are up for renewal are set out in Appendix 1 to this notice.
  2. However, the manner in which the Corporation provides its services is changing to meet the needs and interests of Canadians and in response to the evolution in how that content is being consumed. As a result, the Corporation now also provides audio and audio-visual content through its online platforms. The Corporation is bound by its mandate outlined in the Act, but the manner in which it delivers on its mandate now includes a mixture of both traditional licensed services and online services.
  3. On 22 May 2019, the Corporation issued Your Stories, Taken to Heart, its new three-year strategic plan. At that time, the Corporation noted that it is driven by a desire to put audiences, individuals and communities first in its programming decisions with a view to building lifelong relationships with its viewers, while strengthening its brand and growing social cohesion. To this end, the Corporation put forth the following priorities to serve Canadians:
    • Customized digital services: The Corporation aims to ensure that all Canadians are reflected in its digital services, while it connects them to the many communities and voices that make Canada a great country.
    • Engaging with young audiences: The Corporation strives to become a leader in bringing the best content to children and youth with the goal of enriching their lives and engaging them with their country.
    • Prioritizing its local connections: The Corporation will strengthen its connection with Canadians with significant local and regional content that is relevant to people in their communities, and bring those communities to the rest of Canada.
    • Reflecting contemporary Canada: The Corporation will reflect the range and richness of Canada’s diversity, celebrating its different perspectives and all the things that bring Canadians together.
    • Taking Canada to the world: The Corporation will ensure that Canada and Canadian creators are seen and heard the world over.

Outcomes

  1. The way in which Canadians consume and create content is changing. Online services and platforms are increasingly being adopted across the country. In the past, the Commission’s approach to regulating the Corporation focused on traditional ways of consuming and broadcasting content (i.e., television and radio services). As Canadians are adopting these new ways of consuming content, the Commission is open to exploring new approaches to ensuring that the Corporation is meeting its objectives set out for it in the Act, while meeting the needs and interests of Canadians across the country.
  2. In light of changes to the consumption habits of Canadians, the manner in which the Corporation now seeks to meet the needs and interests of Canadians and Canadian society, and the Corporation’s mandate as set out in the Act, the Commission considers that the Corporation’s activities should be regulated in the next licence term with a view to:
    • ensuring that its programming:
      • reflects and meets the needs and interests of Canadians, including diversity groups, in both official languages;
      • is of high quality and supports Canadian producers and content creators;
      • is accessible and discoverable across Canada and abroad; and
      • contributes to democratic life in Canada;
    • establishing a regulatory approach that is consistent with the Corporation’s mandate and best meets the needs of Canadians, with consideration given to how it should include the Corporation’s evolving approach to the delivery of content across multiple platforms, including on online platforms; and
    • establishing a measurement framework that reports on the achievement of the Corporation’s mandate as set out in the Act in order to ensure it remains transparently accountable to Canadians and to the Commission in regard to its programming and activities.

Overarching programming objectives

  1. As Canadians are increasingly consuming programming in a platform- and service-agnostic way, organizing the present licence renewal process for the Corporation on a traditional service-based approach may not be responsive to the current realities of programming consumption. The Commission is therefore proposing an approach based on overarching objectives that takes into account the nature of the programming broadcast by the Corporation.
  2. Accordingly, and to help focus the discussion and the broader outcomes of this proceeding, the Commission sets out below four overarching objectives: the reflection of Canadians, including diversity groups in Canada; the Corporation’s contribution to the high-quality production of Canadian programming; access to and distribution of Canadian programming; and the role of the Corporation’s programming in contributing to democratic life in Canada.
  3. To identify these objectives, the Commission carefully reviewed the mandate of the Corporation as set out in the Act and the Corporation’s current strategic plan, and took into account the changing viewing and listening habits of Canadians as well as the Commission’s views regarding flexible regulation of the broadcasting system in the future. 
Reflection of Canadians, including diversity groups
  1. Pursuant to section 3(1)(m)(iv) of the Act, the programming provided by the Corporation should “be in English and in French, reflecting the different needs and circumstances of each official language community, including the particular needs and circumstances of English and French linguistic minorities.” Further, pursuant to section 3(1)(m)(v) of the Act, the Corporation’s programming should “strive to be of equivalent quality in English and in French.”
  2. By virtue of its activities and important contributions to meeting the broader objectives of the Act, the Corporation should produce, commission and make available audio and audio-visual content on multiple platforms that meets the needs of and reflects the diverse Canadian population, including those from the following groups: women, Indigenous groups, ethnic and multicultural groups, official language minority communities (OLMCs), children and youth, Canadians with disabilities, and LGBTQ2 Canadians).
  3. In regard to the diverse content broadcast on the Corporation’s services (such as news and public affairs, drama, documentaries, music and variety, and lifestyle programming), the Commission is of the view that diversity groups should be reflected in discoverable content on all of the Corporation’s traditional and online platforms and services.
  4. In light of the above, the Commission invites responses to the following:


    Q1. Comment on the types, range and quality of the programming offered on the Corporation’s English-language platforms and services.

    Q2. Comment on the types, range and quality of the programming offered on the Corporation’s French-language platforms and services.

    Q3. The English- and French-language viewing and listening markets in Canada have different dynamics and realities, both of which can affect the programming needs of the various communities within these markets. Is the Corporation addressing the distinct needs and interests of each linguistic market in the best ways possible? What improvements could be made to ensure that the Corporation’s programming meets those needs and interests?

    Q4. Is the programming offered on the Corporation’s English- and French-language traditional and online platforms and services equally diverse and innovative? If not, what are the differences, and on which platforms or services do differences exist? What could the Corporation do to rectify any imbalance?

    Q5. Does the programming offered on all of the Corporation’s platforms and services reflect the diversity of Canadians? Are the following groups adequately and appropriately reflected?

    1. women
    2. Indigenous groups
    3. ethnic and multicultural groups
    4. OLMCs
    5. children and youth
    6. Canadians with disabilities
    7. LGBTQ2 Canadians

    Q6. Is programming that is reflective of the various groups mentioned above easily discoverable, available and identifiable? If not, what could the Corporation do to improve the discoverability, availability and identification of content that reflects these groups?

    Q7. What could the Corporation do to ensure that its programming remains reflective of Canada’s regions while serving the special needs and interests of those regions, including Indigenous peoples in different parts of Canada, on all of its platforms and services?

Production of Canadian programming
  1. The Corporation has an extensive in-house capacity to produce Canadian audio-visual and audio content as well as extensive partnerships with Canada’s independent production community and content creators. It is therefore incumbent on the Corporation that it contribute to a vibrant Canadian broadcasting system with the continued creation of high-quality Canadian audio-visual and audio content for both domestic and international consumption. The Commission is of the view that the Corporation should:
    • create and broadcast high-quality original Canadian productions;
    • support independent and emerging content creators and artists;
    • support diversity in key production roles (for example, women, Indigenous peoples and OLMCs);
    • ensure that Canadian content is available on all of its platforms and services;
    • contribute financially to the production of Canadian programming; and
    • leverage Canadian and international partnerships to the benefit of Canadian audiences as well as to the benefit of content creators and producers.
  2. In light of the above, the Commission invites responses to the following questions:


    Q8. What, if any, improvements could be made to ensure that the Corporation creates and broadcasts high-quality original Canadian productions?

    Q9. How could the Corporation ensure that the programming provided across all of its platforms and services remains predominantly and distinctively Canadian?

    Q10. How does the Corporation provide support to independent content creators? Emerging content creators? What value added does this support bring to the Corporation’s programming and to Canadians?

    Q11. Does the Corporation provide adequate support to ensure diversity in key production roles on all of its platforms and services? To what extent is this diversity reflected in its programming choices? What could the Corporation do to increase and improve such diversity in production?

    Q12. The Corporation must provide programming that is distinctively and predominantly Canadian. By what means does the Corporation make consumers aware of the origin of the content (Canadian or international) provided on its services and platforms? What improvements, if any, could the Corporation make in regard to identifying the origin of such content?

    Q13. Is the Corporation effectively leveraging international partnerships for the creation of high-quality content? If not, how could the Corporation do this more effectively?

Access to and distribution of Canadian programming
  1. In regard to access to and the distribution of Canadian programming, the Commission is of the view that the Corporation should:
    • ensure that Canadian programming is available and discoverable in Canada and abroad on various platforms and services;
    • ensure access to a variety of programming in a balanced fashion on all platforms and services;
    • ensure that content is accessible to Canadians with disabilities on traditional and online platforms and services; and
    • leverage international partnerships to ensure the international distribution of high-quality Canadian content.
  2. In light of the above, the Commission invites responses to the following questions:


    Q14. Taking into consideration the content that the Corporation has made available on multiple online platforms (for example, mobile applications and online streaming services), what could it do to continue to serve and meet the needs of Canadians who cannot or do not consume content via online platforms? In other words, how could the Corporation ensure that Canadians are well served regardless of the platform they use or to which they have access?

    Q15. Should the Commission take a different regulatory approach in regard to the Corporation’s services, depending on the platform or service, to ensure that its programming continues to be available to Canadians across the country? If yes, how should such an approach differ on a per-platform basis? For example, are there certain types of programming that would best be offered through online platforms or through traditional television or radio services?

    Q16. Is the Corporation’s programming (both audio-visual and audio) accessible to Canadians with disabilities? What, if any, improvements could be made in this regard?

    Q17. Is the Corporation’s programming (both audio-visual and audio) available and easily discoverable on multiple platforms, both here and abroad? What, if any, improvements could be made in this regard?

Role of programming in democratic life
  1. Verifiable, reliable and trusted news and information made from a Canadian perspective is of paramount importance for Canadians to engage constructively with their national institutions be they public, not-for-profit or private. Canadians should have access to programming at the national, regional and local levels to help them participate in different spheres of civil society. Canadians deserve to be well informed about events that affect their lives and be provided with important information during times of emergencies. The Corporation is one of the key voices in Canada that is particularly well placed to provide such services. In regard to the role of the Corporation’s programming in contributing to the democratic life of Canada, the Commission is of the view that the Corporation should:
    • provide trustworthy, verified and non-biased news and information;
    • provide local, regional, national and international news from a Canadian perspective;
    • provide news and information on all platforms and services;
    • support the work of the Corporation’s Ombudsmen; and
    • provide Canadians with timely, accurate and (where available) bilingual emergency alert warnings throughout Canada.
  2. In light of the above, the Commission invites responses to the following questions:

    Q18. To what extent is the Corporation adequately serving, or not adequately serving, local, regional and national communities with news and information programming on all of its platforms and services? How has the Corporation increased use of online services affected its local programming as well as news and information content on its traditional platforms?

    Q19. Has the Corporation’s use of online platforms to make news and information available to Canadians had a positive effect on democratic life in Canada? If yes, what is that effect, and who benefits from these new ways of sharing information? If no, what improvements can be made?

    Q20. In an era where false and misleading news is increasingly being shared on the Internet, what should the Corporation do to continue being a trusted, verified and non-biased source of news and information? What key role will the Corporation play in the future online world of trustworthy news and information?

    Q21. The Corporation is expected to distribute emergency alerts to the public in both official languages when available, in accordance with the National Public Alerting System Common Look and Feel Guidance, version 2.0. Provide details on the importance of emergency alerts on the Corporation’s platforms and services across the country, especially in rural and remote regions where long-term evolution (LTE) technology may not be available.

Regulatory approach for the Corporation’s services

  1. In 2018, the Commission issued the report entitled Harnessing Change: The Future of Programming Distribution in Canada. Supported by significant research into the changing patterns of content consumption and distribution in Canada, the report stated that traditional licensing models do not reflect the emerging realities of the business of broadcasting or the ways in which Canadians consume and create content. To continue to meet the objectives outlined under the Act in its current form, nimble regulatory approaches would need to be adopted.
  2. While the data continues to show that the viewing and listening habits of Canadians continue to change, not all population segments are being affected in the same way. In August 2019, Media Technology Monitor released a report entitled Canadian Viewing Profiles, which tracks changes in the viewing and listening habits of Canadians from 2011 to 2019. The report focused on five segments ranging from Canadians with the most traditional viewing and listening habits (i.e., consuming audio-visual content on a television set through a paid television subscription service, such as cable or satellite, and listening to audio content on traditional radio) to Canadians who rely primarily on online free and paid streaming services for consuming audio-visual content, and more and more on streaming music services and podcasts for consuming audio content.
  3. Consumers of traditional television and radio services continue to form the largest segment, but this segment has also experienced the greatest decrease in size from 2011 to 2019. The segment of viewers least tied to traditional viewing habits has experienced the greatest increase in size during the same period. Across the full spectrum of viewing segments, there has been a trend towards viewing and listening to content online or through subscription services.
  4. The Commission’s current regulatory approach regarding the Corporation relies on specific, quantitative conditions of licence focused entirely on its traditional television and radio services. In recent years, however, the Corporation has adopted a multi-platform approach to providing programming. While it continues to provide programming on conventional television and radio stations, the Corporation also provides a significant amount of programming on multiple online platforms. The Commission is therefore faced with the question of whether the regulatory approach for the Corporation should continue to focus exclusively on the traditional means for delivering content, as it has done in the past, or whether a new approach should be adopted to consider aspects of the Corporation’s strategy to adapt to the evolving viewing and listening habits of Canadians through the delivery of content across multiple platforms.
  5. As set out in section 9 of the Act, the Commission has the authority to either license services, or exempt services from licensing requirements. While the Corporation operates its television and radio services pursuant to existing licences, it operates its online platforms under the Exemption order for digital media broadcasting undertakings, which is set out in the appendix to Broadcasting Order 2012-409. Under a scenario where the Commission considers content on online platforms as contributions to the Corporation’s ability to meet its mandate under the Act, only existing regulatory tools can be used when establishing requirements for the Corporation during the next licence term. Accordingly, in this notice of consultation, the Commission is seeking comments on whether the Corporation’s operations as a whole should be considered under a more adaptive regulatory framework and, if so, by what means.
  6. This proceeding is designed, in part, to explore how the Commission can be flexible in terms of its regulatory approach for the Corporation, while ensuring that the Corporation fulfils its mandate as set out in the Act in the most appropriate fashion, given technological advancements and the variety of means available to Canadians to access content produced by the Corporation.
  7. In its application, the Corporation expressed the view that the regulatory framework should be better aligned with changes in viewing patterns. Consequently, it is proposing an approach to content commitments for its English-and French-language television networks that takes into account, for the very first time, both traditional and online exhibition of audio-visual content. More specifically, in order to “recognize and encourage the exhibition of audio-visual content on online platforms,” the Corporation is proposing the following:
    • a cross-platform goal described as the total number of exhibition hours for combined conventional television and online platforms;
    • an accompanying condition of licence setting a minimum exhibition requirement for conventional television; and
    • that anything between the conventional television minimum and the total exhibition goal could be broadcast either on the conventional television network or on an online platform.
  8. The Corporation has proposed certain amendments to, additions of and deletions of conditions of licence and expectations relating to programming broadcast on its English- and French-language audio-visual and audio services. Specific details relating to the above are set out in Appendix 2 to this notice.
  9. In light of the above, the Commission invites responses to the following questions:


    Q22. Would it be appropriate to regulate the programming activities of the Corporation in a manner that focuses solely on the provision of content via traditional television and radio services? If yes, elaborate on the reasons why.

    Q23. In regard to the Corporation’s proposal for a new flexible approach to content commitments, does this new approach continue to ensure that the Corporation is meeting its mandate and serving Canadians across the country? Are there new approaches the Commission should consider in this regard?

    Q24. Taking into account the entirety of the Corporation’s operations, how could including content on online platforms and services better allow the Commission to ensure that broadcasting policy objectives and outcomes are being achieved?

    Q25. In what way could the Corporation’s online platforms and services and their content be incorporated into such an approach, and how should the existing regulatory tools be used?

    Q26. The activities of the Corporation are generally regulated through exhibition requirements. Would it be appropriate to consider expenditure requirements in regard to its traditional or online services as a way to ensure that the Corporation continues to meet its mandate under the Act while being regulated in a more adaptive manner?

    Q27. How could programming requirements (relating to expenditures or exhibition) normally imposed by condition of licence on a specific service take into account programming provided on a number of platforms by linear and/or on-demand services?

    Q28. Considering the strengths and weaknesses of each platform, how can the Commission ensure that the Corporation is using them in the most effective way in order to serve Canadians across the country and meet public policy goals? What other regulatory requirements would be appropriate under a framework that considers online activities? Why would they be appropriate?

Measurement framework

  1. Regardless of the regulatory approach taken, it is important that Canadians understand what services are being delivered to them, and how, and that they have a meaningful understanding of how the Corporation is meeting their needs. In the Commission’s view, any conditions of licence it may impose on the Corporation and any expectations it may set out should be underpinned by a clear, transparent and comprehensive measurement framework that ensures the Corporation is held accountable for its programming.
  2. Currently, measurement requirements are based on traditional measurement tools (such as reporting requirements, public opinion research and programming logs) that focus on the traditional regulatory system. However, as noted above, the Commission is considering whether to include content from online services in this licence renewal proceeding. Given that regulatory requirements must be supported by strong, outcomes-based measurement provisions, the Commission must consider new tools to ensure that the priorities identified by the Commission, as well as objectives set out in the Act, are being met.
  3. Measurement tools should be transparent, proportionate and not unduly administratively burdensome. They must also be realistic and achievable, taking into account available resources and expertise available to the Corporation. The choice of tools must also take into account the Corporation’s role as the public broadcaster and the need to ensure that it remains publicly and transparently accountable for its activities, regardless of the delivery mechanism it uses for its programming. Any measurement requirements imposed on the Corporation should be reasonable, useful, timely and easily communicated to the Canadian public. Imposed requirements must also be related directly to the objectives to be achieved by the Corporation and to its mandate as set out in the Act.
  4. The Corporation has, in its application, proposed the following new reporting commitments to be imposed as conditions of licence:
    • new consultation and reporting commitments relating to content created by and for Indigenous peoples;
    • new reporting commitments for reflecting diversity on-screen, in content production, and across the Corporation’s workforce; and
    • new reporting commitments for gender parity in audio-visual content production.
  5. However, the Corporation has stated in its applications that it measures “digital success” through several key performance indicators such as reach, engagements and visits. In spite of this, the Corporation has not proposed any other new measurement requirements in light of the new flexible approach to content commitments it is proposing.
  6. In light of the above, the Commission invites responses to the following questions:


    Q29. While it is easy to measure exhibition requirements on traditional services for important types of programming such as Canadian programming, programs of national interest and children’s programming, such is not the case for online content. How should/could the various requirements imposed and objectives set out for the Corporation be measured on both traditional and online platforms and services? Provide specific examples for different types of content or different content requirements. Which measurement tools would be most appropriate for this purpose? Could current reporting requirements be replaced with more focused requirements? If yes, what form could those requirements take?

    Q30. The Corporation’s success should be measured against its mandate, as set out in the Act. How could success best be measured on online platforms and services? How could it be measured better on traditional platforms and services?

    Q31. The Corporation’s mandate requires programming that is reflective of Canada and its regions and of Canada’s linguistic and multicultural diversity, in both the English and French languages. How should this be measured in this framework?

    Q32. The Corporation’s mandate requires that its programming be of equivalent quality in English and French. How should the Commission define the notion of quality as expressed in the Act and how can this be best measured on all platforms and services?

    Q33. What is the best way to measure or assess the reflection of and engagement with groups such as women, Indigenous peoples, ethnic and multicultural groups, OLMCs, children and youth, Canadians with disabilities, and LGBTQ2 Canadians in the production and broadcast of content on all of the Corporation’s platforms and services (television, radio and online services)?

Report on the evolution of services offered by public broadcasters

  1. In the context of this proceeding, a report has been commissioned by the Commission in order to inform the record on services offered by public broadcasters in other jurisdictions, their governance, and measurement frameworks. The Commission intends to make this report publicly available at a later date and ensure that the public has the opportunity to provide comments as part of this proceeding.

Procedure

  1. The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission Rules of Practice and Procedure (the Rules of Procedure) apply to the present proceeding. The Rules of Procedure set out, among other things, the rules for content, format, filing and service of interventions, answer, replies and requests for information; the procedure for filing confidential information and requesting its disclosure; and the conduct of public hearings. Accordingly, the procedure set out below must be read in conjunction with the Rules of Procedure and related documents, which can be found on the Commission’s website under “Statutes and Regulations.” Broadcasting and Telecom Information Bulletin 2010-959 provides information to help interested persons and parties understand the Rules of Procedure so that they can more effectively participate in Commission proceedings.
  2. The Commission invites interventions that address the questions and issues set out above. Although specific questions are set out in this notice, interventions may address any issues relevant to the renewal of the Corporation’s broadcasting licences for its English- and French-language audio and audio-visual programming services. The Commission will accept interventions that it receives on or before 13 February 2020. The deadline for the filing of replies by the Corporation is 28 February 2020.
  3. In accordance with section 35(1)(b) of the Rules of Procedure, the Commission directs the Corporation to give notice of this notice of consultation through broadcast over the Corporation’s facilities. This notice must set out the following:
    1. the nature of the matters to be considered,
    2. the deadline for intervening in the proceeding, and
    3. the date and time of the commencement of the hearing.
  4. An intervention or an answer from a respondent must be filed with the Commission and served on the Corporation on or before the above-mentioned date. An answer from a respondent must also be served on any other respondent.
  5. Interventions and answers must clearly identify the application referred to and indicate whether parties support or oppose the application, or, if they propose changes to it, include the facts and grounds for their proposal.
  6. The intervention or answer must include one of the following statements in either the first or the last paragraph:
    1. I request to appear at the public hearing.
    2. I do not want to appear at the public hearing.
  7. Parties are permitted to coordinate, organize, and file, in a single submission, interventions by other interested persons who share their position but do not wish to appear at the hearing. Information on how to file this type of submission, known as a joint supporting intervention, as well as a template for the covering letter to be filed by the parties, can be found in Broadcasting Information Bulletin 2010-28-1.
  8. The Commission encourages interested persons and parties to monitor the record of the proceeding, available on the Commission’s website, for additional information that they may find useful when preparing their submissions.
  9. Submissions longer than five pages should include a summary. Each paragraph of all submissions should be numbered, and the line ***End of document*** should follow the last paragraph. This will help the Commission verify that the document has not been damaged during electronic transmission.
  10. Pursuant to Broadcasting and Telecom Information Bulletin 2015-242, the Commission expects incorporated entities and associations, and encourages all Canadians, to file submissions for Commission proceedings in accessible formats (for example, text-based file formats that allow text to be enlarged or modified, or read by screen readers). To provide assistance in this regard, the Commission has posted on its website guidelines for preparing documents in accessible formats.
  11. Submissions must be filed by sending them to the Secretary General of the Commission using only one of the following means:


    by completing the
    [Intervention/comment/answer form]

    or

    by mail to
    CRTC, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0N2

    or

    by fax at
    819-994-0218

  12. A true copy of each intervention or answer from a respondent must be sent to the applicant and, in the case of a respondent to an application, to any other respondent.
  13. Parties who send documents electronically must ensure that they will be able to prove, upon Commission request, that filing, or where required, service of a particular document was completed. Accordingly, parties must keep proof of the sending and receipt of each document for 180 days after the date on which the document is filed or served. The Commission advises parties who file or serve documents by electronic means to exercise caution when using email for the service of documents, as it may be difficult to establish that service has occurred.
  14. In accordance with the Rules of Procedure, a document must be received by the Commission and all relevant parties by 5 p.m. Vancouver time (8 p.m. Ottawa time) on the date it is due. Parties are responsible for ensuring the timely delivery of their submissions and will not be notified if their submissions are received after the deadline. Late submissions, including those due to postal delays, will not be considered by the Commission and will not be made part of the public record.
  15. The Commission will not formally acknowledge submissions. It will, however, fully consider all submissions, which will form part of the public record of the proceeding, provided that the procedure for filing set out above has been followed.
  16. If parties wish to appear, they must provide reasons why their written interventions or answers are not sufficient and why an appearance is necessary. Parties requiring communication support must state their request on the first page of their intervention. Only those parties whose requests to appear have been granted will be contacted by the Commission and invited to appear at the public hearing.
  17. Although the public hearing will be held in Gatineau, Quebec, the Commission will consider providing videoconference links to enable remote participation (audio or video), should it receive requests to do so.
  18. Persons requiring communications support such as assistance listening devices and sign language interpretation are requested to inform the Commission at least twenty (20) days before the commencement of the public hearing so that the necessary arrangements can be made.

Important notice

  1. All information that parties provide as part of this public process, except information designated confidential, whether sent by postal mail, fax, email or through the Commission’s website at www.crtc.gc.ca, becomes part of a publicly accessible file and will be posted on the Commission’s website. This information includes personal information, such as full names, email addresses, postal/street addresses, telephone and fax numbers, etc.
  2. The personal information that parties provide will be used and may be disclosed for the purpose for which the information was obtained or compiled by the Commission, or for a use consistent with that purpose.
  3. Documents received electronically or otherwise will be put on the Commission’s website in their entirety exactly as received, including any personal information contained therein, in the official language and format in which they are received. Documents not received electronically will be available in PDF format.
  4. The information that parties provide to the Commission as part of this public process is entered into an unsearchable database dedicated to this specific public process. This database is accessible only from the web page of this particular public process. As a result, a general search of the Commission’s website with the help of either its own search engine or a third-party search engine will not provide access to the information that was provided as part of this public process.

Availability of documents

  1. Electronic versions of the applications are available on the Commission’s website at www.crtc.gc.ca by selecting the application number within this notice. They are also available from the applicant, either on its website or upon request by directly contacting the applicant. In regard to the present proceeding, the following is the contact information for the Corporation:


    181 Queen Street
    Ottawa, Ontario
    K1P 1K9
    Fax: 613-288-6257
    Email: regulatoryaffairs@cbc.ca
    Website to view application: https://cbc.radio-canada.ca/en/impact-and-accountability/regulatory/submissions
    Email to request electronic version of application: regulatoryaffairs@cbc.ca

  2. Electronic versions of the interventions and answers, as well as of other documents referred to in this notice, are available on the Commission’s website at www.crtc.gc.ca by visiting the “Consultations and hearings – Have your say!” section, then selecting “our applications and processes that are open for comment”. Documents can then be accessed by clicking on the links in the “Subject” and “Related Documents” columns associated with this particular notice.
  3. Documents are also available at the following address, upon request, during normal business hours.


    Les Terrasses de la Chaudière
    Central Building
    1 Promenade du Portage
    Gatineau, Quebec
    J8X 4B1
    Tel.: 819-997-2429
    Fax: 819-994-0218

    Toll-free telephone: 1-877-249-2782
    Toll-free TTY: 1-877-909-2782

Secretary General

Related documents

Appendix 1 to Broadcasting Notice of Consultation CRTC 2019-379

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation services for which the broadcasting licences are up for renewal

French-language television stations (as of June 2019)

Province Call sign / Location
British Columbia CBUFT-DT Vancouver
Alberta CBXFT-DT Edmonton
Saskatchewan CBKFT-DT Regina
Manitoba CBWFT-DT Winnipeg
Ontario CBLFT-DT Toronto
CBOFT-DT Ottawa
Quebec CBFT-DT Montréal
CBVT-DT Québec
CJBR‐DT Rimouski
CKSH‐DT Sherbrooke
CKTM‐DT Trois‐Rivières
CKTV‐DT Saguenay/Chicoutimi
New Brunswick CBAFT-DT Moncton

French-language discretionary services (as of June 2019)

ICI ARTV

ICI EXPLORA

ICI RDI

French-language radio stations and rebroadcasting transmitters (as of June 2019)

ICI Première Chaîne
Province Call sign / Location
British Columbia CBUF‐FM Vancouver and its transmitters:
CBUF-FM-1 Chilliwack
CBUF-FM-2 Kelowna
CBUF-FM-3 Terrace
CBUF-FM-4 Prince George
CBUF-FM-5 Kitimat
CBUF-FM-6 Kamloops
CBUF-FM-7 Dawson Creek
CBUF-FM-8 Port Alberni
CBUF-FM-9 Victoria
CBUF-FM-10 Whistler
Alberta CHFA-10-FM Edmonton (formerly CHFA Edmonton) and its transmitters:
CBRF-FM Calgary
CHFA-1-FM Lethbridge
CHFA-2-FM Red Deer
CHFA-3-FM Peace River
CHFA-4-FM Hinton
CHFA-5-FM Grande Prairie
CHFA-6-FM Fort McMurray
CHFA-7-FM Falher
CHFA-8-FM Medicine Hat
CHFA-9-FM St-Paul
CHFA-11-FM Lake Louise
CHFA-12-FM Banff
CHFA-13-FM Jasper
Saskatchewan CBKF‐FM Regina and its transmitters:
CBKF-1 Gravelbourg
CBKF-2 Saskatoon
CBKF-FM-3 Zenon Park
CBKF-FM-4 Bellegarde
CBKF-FM-5 North Battleford
Manitoba CKSB-10-FM Winnipeg (formerly CKSB Saint‐Boniface) and its transmitters:
CKSB-1-FM Ste Rose du Lac
CKSB-2 St. Lazare
CKSB-3-FM The Pas
CKSB-4-FM Flin Flon
CKSB-5-FM Thompson
CKSB-6-FM Dryden, Ontario
CKSB-7-FM Kenora, Ontario
CKSB-8-FM Brandon
CKSB-9-FM Fort Frances, Ontario
Ontario CBEF Windsor and its transmitters:
CBEF-1-FM Leamington
CBEF-2-FM Windsor
CBEF-3-FM Sarnia
CJBC Toronto and its transmitters:
CJBC-1-FM Belleville
CJBC-2-FM Kingston
CJBC-3-FM Penetanguishene
CJBC-4-FM London
CJBC-5-FM Peterborough
CBOF‐FM Ottawa and its transmitters:
CBOF-1 Maniwaki, Quebec
CBOF-4 Rolphton
CBOF-FM-6 Cornwall
CBOF-FM-7 Brockville
CBOF-FM-9 L’Isle-aux-Allumettes, Quebec (formerly CBOF-FM-9 Chapeau, Quebec)
CBON‐FM Sudbury and its transmitters:
CBON-6 Blind River (not yet in operation)
CBON-10 Matachewan
CBON-12 Mattawa
CBON-FM-1 Kirkland Lake
CBON-FM-2 Temiskaming Shores (formerly CBON-FM-2 Haileybury)
CBON-FM-5 Elliot Lake
CBON-FM-7 Espanola
CBON-FM-11 Dubreuilville
CBON-FM-17 North Bay
CBON-FM-18 Sault Ste. Marie
CBON-FM-19 Nipigon
CBON-FM-20 Thunder Bay
CBON-FM-21 Gogama
CBON-FM-22 Geraldton
CBON-FM-23 Manitouwadge
CBON-FM-24 Kapuskasing
CBON-FM-25 Timmins
CBON-FM-26 Hearst
CBON-FM-27 Wawa
CBON-FM-28 Chapleau
CBON-FM-29 Marathon
Quebec CBF‐FM Montréal and its transmitters:
CBF-FM-7 Radisson
CBF-FM-9 Mont-Laurier
CBF-FM-13 Saint-Michel-des-Saints
CBF-FM-14 Mont-Tremblant (formerly CBF-FM-14 Saint-Jovite)
CBF-FM-15 Rivière-Rouge (formerly CBF-FM-15 L’Annonciation)
CBF-FM-20 St-Donat
CBF‐FM‐8 Trois‐Rivières and its transmitters:
CBF-16 Clova
CBF-17 Lac-Édouard
CBF-FM-18 Parent (formerly CBF-18 Parent)
CBF-FM-19 La Tuque
CBFA-FM-1 Manouane (formerly a transmitter of CBFG-FM Chisasibi)
CBFA-FM-2 Obedjiwan (formerly a transmitter of CBFG-FM Chisasibi)
CBFG-FM-3 Weymontachie (formerly CBAF-3 Weymontachie, a transmitter of CBFG-FM Chisasibi)
CBF‐FM‐10 Sherbrooke and its transmitters:
CBF-FM-2 Magog
CBF-FM-6 Lac-Mégantic
CBF-FM-11 Asbestos/Danville
CBF-FM-12 Victoriaville
CBFG-FM Chisasibi (Fort-George) and its transmitters:
CBFG-FM-1 Kuujjuaq
CBFG-FM-2 Kuujjuarapik
CBFH-FM Waskaganish
CBFM-FM Mistassini
CBFV-FM Waswanipi
CBFW-FM Wemindji (Nouveau-Comptoir)
CBGA‐FM Matane and its transmitters:
CBGA-3-FM Rivière-au-Renard
CBGA-4-FM Lac-au-Saumonv
CBGA-8-FM Îles-de-la-Madeleine
CBGA-9-FM Cloridorme
CBGA-10-FM Gaspé
CBGA-11-FM Saint-Maxime-du-Mont-Louis (formerly CBGA-11-FM Mont-Louis-En-Haut)
CBGA-12-FM Marsoui
CBGA-13-FM Gros-Morne
CBGA-14-FM Grande-Vallée
CBGA-15-FM L’Anse-à-Valleau
CBGA-FM-1 New Carlisle
CBGA-FM-6 Murdochville (formerly CBGA-6 Murdochville)
CBGA-FM-7 Sainte-Anne-des-Monts
CBGA-FM-16 Chandler
CBGA-FM-17 New Richmond
CBGA-FM-18 Percé
CBGA-FM-19 Port-Daniel-Gascons (formerly CBGA-FM-19 Port-Daniel)
CBGA-FM-20 Pointe-à-la-garde
CBGA-FM-21 Matapédia (formerly CBGA-1 Grande Anse)
CBJ‐FM Saguenay/Chicoutimi and its transmitters:
CBJ-2 Chapais
CBJ-FM-1 Chibougamau
CBJ-FM-3 Dolbeau-Mistassini (formerly CBJ-FM-3 Dolbeau)
CBJ-FM-4 L’Anse-St-Jean
CBJ-FM-6 La Baie
CBSI‐FM Sept‐Îles and its transmitters:
CBSI-5 Natashquan (not yet in operation)
CBSI-8 La Romaine (not yet in operation)
CBSI-14 Aguanish
CBSI-23 Port-Menier
CBSI-FM-2 Schefferville
CBSI-FM-3 Churchill Falls, Newfoundland and Labrador
CBSI-FM-4 Labrador City/Wabush, Newfoundland and Labrador
CBSI-FM-6 Fermont (formerly CBSI-6 Fermont)
CBSI-FM-7 Havre-St-Pierre
CBSI-FM-15 Harrington Harbour
CBSI-FM-16 Tête-à-la-Baleine
CBSI-FM-17 Gros-Mécatina (formerly CBSI-FM-17 La Tabatière)
CBSI-FM-18 Saint-Augustin
CBSI-FM-19 Vieux-Fort (formerly CBSI-FM-19 Old Fort Bay)
CBSI-FM-20 Bonne-Espérance (formerly CBSI-FM-20 Rivière-Saint-Paul)
CBSI-FM-21 Blanc Sablon
CBSI-FM-24 Baie-Comeau
CBV‐FM Québec and its transmitters:
CBV-FM-1 Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupré
CBV-FM-4 Saint-Pamphile
CBV-FM-5 Saint-Fabien-de-Panet
CBV-FM-6 La Malbaie
CBV-FM-7 Saint-Georges (formerly CBV-FM-7 Saint-Georges-de-Beauce)
CBV-FM-8 Thetford Mines
CBV-FM-9 Baie-Saint-Paul
CHLM‐FM Rouyn‐Noranda and its transmitters:
CBF-FM-1 Senneterre (formerly CBF-1 Senneterre)
CBF-FM-3 Lebel-sur-Quévillon (formerly CBF-3 Lebel-sur-Quévillon)
CBF-4 Matagami
CBFY-FM Ville-Marie
CBFZ-FM Témiscaming
CHLM-FM-1 Malartic
CHLM-FM-2 La Sarre
CJBR‐FM Rimouski and its transmitter:
CJBR-FM-1 Rivière-du-Loup
New Brunswick CBAF‐FM Moncton and its transmitters:
CBAF-FM-1 Fredericton/Saint John
CBAF-FM-2 Allardville
CBAF-FM-3 Campbellton
CBAF-FM-4 Edmundston
CBAF-FM-18 Grande-Anse/Caraquet
CBAF-FM-21 Bon Accord
CBAF-FM-22 Saint-Quentin (formerly CBAF-21 Saint-Quentin)
CBAF-FM-23 Kedgwick (formerly CBAF-20 Kedgwick)
Nova Scotia CBAF‐FM‐5 Halifax and its transmitters:
CBAF-FM-6 Middleton
CBAF-FM-7 Digby
CBAF-FM-8 Weymouth
CBAF-FM-9 Yarmouth
CBAF-FM-10 New Glasgow
CBAF-FM-11 Mulgrave
CBAF-FM-12 Margaree
CBAF-FM-13 Cheticamp
CBAF-FM-14 Sydney
CBAF-FM-16 Port au Port, Newfoundland and Labrador
CBAF-FM-17 St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador
Prince Edward Island CBAF‐FM‐15 Charlottetown and its transmitters:
CBAF-FM-19 Urbainville
CBAF-FM-20 St. Edward/St. Louis
ICI Musique
Province Call sign / Location
British Columbia CBUX‐FM Vancouver and its transmitter:
CBUX-FM-1 Victoria
Alberta CBCX‐FM Calgary and its transmitter:
CBCX-FM-1 Edmonton
Manitoba CKSB‐FM Winnipeg and its transmitters:
CKSB-FM-1 Regina, Saskatchewan
CKSB-FM-2 Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
Ontario CBBX‐FM Sudbury
CBOX‐FM Ottawa
CJBC‐FM Toronto and its transmitters:
CJBC-FM-1 Windsor
CJBC-FM-2 Kitchener/Brantford (formerly CJBC-FM-2 Paris)
Quebec CBFX‐FM Montréal and its transmitters:
CBFX-FM-3 Malartic (formerly CBFX-FM-3 Amos)
CBFX-FM-4 Rouyn-Noranda
CBFX-FM-5 Gaspé
CBFX-FM-6 Mont-Laurier
CBFX-FM-1 Trois-Rivières (formerly a transmitter of CBFX-FM Montréal)
CBFX-FM-2 Sherbrooke (formerly a transmitter of CBFX-FM Montréal)
CBJX‐FM Saguenay/Chicoutimi and its transmitter:
CBJX-FM-1 Dolbeau-Mistassini (formerly CBJX-FM-1 Dolbeau)
CBRX‐FM Rimouski and its transmitters:
CBRX-FM-1 Matane
CBRX-FM-2 Sept-Îles
CBRX-FM-3 Rivière-du-Loup
CBVX‐FM Québec and its transmitters:
CBVX-FM-1 Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupré
CBVX-FM-2 La Malbaie
CBVX-FM-3 Baie-Saint-Paul
New Brunswick CBAL‐FM Moncton and its transmitters:
CBAL-FM-1 Allardville
CBAL-FM-2 Grande-Anse/Caraquet (formerly CBAL-FM-2 Lameque)
CBAL-FM-3 Campbellton
CBAL-FM-4 Fredericton/Saint John
CBAL-FM-5 Edmundston
Nova Scotia CBAX‐FM Halifax and its transmitters:
CBAX-FM-1 Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island
CBAX-FM-2 St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador
CBAX-FM-3 Yarmouth

English-language television stations (as of June 2019)

Province / Territory Call sign / Location
British Columbia CBUT-DT Vancouver
Alberta CBRT-DT Calgary
CBXT-DT Edmonton
Saskatchewan CBKT-DT Regina
Manitoba CBWT-DT Winnipeg
Ontario CBET-DT Windsor
CBLT-DT Toronto
CBOT-DT Ottawa
Quebec CBMT-DT Montréal
New Brunswick CBAT-DT Fredericton
CBHT-DT Halifax
Prince Edward Island CBCT-DT Charlottetown
Newfoundland and Labrador CBNT-DT St. John’s
Northwest Territories CFYK‐DT Yellowknife

English-language discretionary services (as of June 2019)

CBC News Network

The documentary channel

English-language radio stations and rebroadcasting transmitters (as of June 2019)

Radio One
Province / Territory Call sign / Location
British Columbia CBCV‐FM Victoria and its transmitters:
CBCV-FM-1 Metchosin/Sooke
CBKJ Gold River
CBKO Coal Harbour
CBKU Sayward
CBRY-FM Alert Bay
CBTQ-FM Port Alberni
CBTT-FM Tahsis
CBTW-FM Woss Camp
CBUW-FM Powell River
CBCV-FM-2 Port Alice (formerly CBUX Port Alice)
CBUY-FM Port Hardy
CBXZ-FM-1 Ucluelet (formerly CBXQ Ucluelet)
CBXZ-FM Tofino
CBYT-FM Campbell River
CBTK-FM Kelowna and its transmitters:
CBKY Keremeos
CBRG-FM Princeton
CBRJ-FM Phoenix (Greenwood)
CBRK Kimberley
CBRO-FM Christina Lake
CBRR-FM Cranbrook
CBTA-FM Trail
CBTE-FM Crawford Bay
CBTK-FM-1 Field (formerly CBRD Field)
CBTK-FM-2 Grand Forks (formerly CBRJ Grand Forks)
CBTK-FM-3 New Denver (formerly CBUI New Denver)
CBTK-FM-4 Braeloch (not yet in operation)
CBTN-FM Fernie
CBTO-FM Revelstoke
CBTP-FM Penticton
CBTS-FM Creston
CBUB-FM Osoyoos
CBUC-FM Salmon Arm
CBUD-FM Bonnington Falls
CBUG Kaslo
CBUJ-FM Winlaw
CBUM Nakusp (to be replaced by CBUM-FM Nakusp, not yet in operation)
CBUN Salmo
CBUQ-FM Radium Hot Springs (Windermere)
CBXE-FM Golden
CBYC-FM Canal Flats
CBYL-FM Lumby
CBYN-FM Nelson
CBYR-FM Rock Creek
CBYS-FM Sparwood
CBYV-FM Vernon
CBYX-FM Enderby
CBU Vancouver and its transmitters:
CBRU-FM Squamish
CBU-1-FM Abbotsford
CBU-2-FM Vancouver
CBU-3-FM Pemberton (formerly CBXK Pemberton)
CBUE-FM Hope
CBYF-FM Chilliwack
CBYH-FM Harrison Hot Springs
CBYW-FM Whistler
CKZU Vancouver
CBYG‐FM Prince George and its transmitters:
CBKG Granisle
CBKQ-FM Dawson Creek
CBRS-FM Smithers
CBRV-FM Vanderhoof
CBTC-FM McBride
CBTI-FM Moricetown
CBTU-FM Tumbler Ridge
CBTV-FM Valemount
CBTX-FM Bella Bella
CBUO-FM Fort Nelson
CBUR-FM Houston
CBUV-FM Fort St. James
CBUZ-FM Chetwynd
CBWF Mackenzie
CBXB-FM Burns Lake
CBXO-FM Ocean Falls
CBXR-FM Fort Fraser
CBYG-FM-2 Hudson’s Hope (formerly CBXU Hudson’s Hope)
CBYD-FM Bella Coola
CBYI-FM Hagensborg
CBYJ-FM Fort St. John
CBYW Wells/Barkerville
CBYY-FM Quesnel (formerly CBYY-FM Kersley)
CBYK-FM Kamloops and its transmitters:
CBKM Blue River
CBKN Shalalth
CBYK-FM-2 Cache Creek (formerly CBKS Cache Creek and CBWA Ashcroft)
CBKZ Clearwater
CBYK-FM-1 Williams Lake (formerly CBRL Williams Lake)
CBRN-FM North Bend
CBRZ Bralorne
CBTF-FM Falkland
CBTG Gold Bridge
CBTY-FM Lytton
CBUH-FM Chase (formerly CBUH Chase)
CBUL-FM Lillooet (formerly CBUL Lillooet)
CBUP Merritt
CBUS-FM 100 Mile House/Prespatou
CBUU Clinton (to be replaced by CBUU-FM Clinton, not yet in operation)
CBYE-FM Logan Lake
CBYO-FM Barriere
CBXA Mica Dam
CBYU-FM Alexis Creek
CBYZ-FM Vavenby
CFPR Prince Rupert and its transmitters:
CBKA Stewart
CBRH New Hazelton
CBTD-FM Kispiox (formerly CBTD Kispiox)
CBTH-FM Terrace
CBTM-FM Masset
CBTZ-FM Kitwanga
CBUK-FM Kitimat
CBYA-FM New Aiyansh (formerly CBYA-FM Aiyansh)
CBYB-FM Port Clements
CBYQ-FM Queen Charlotte
Alberta CBR Calgary and its transmitters:
CBR-1-FM Calgary
CBR-2-FM Crowsnest Pass (formerly CBXC Coleman)
CBRA-FM Coutts/Milk River
CBRB-FM Banff
CBRC-FM Harvie Heights
CBRD-FM Red Deer
CBRE-FM Exshaw
CBRI-FM Etzikom
CBRL-FM Lethbridge
CBRM-FM Medicine Hat
CBRP-FM Pincher Creek
CBRQ-FM Lake Louise
CBX Edmonton and its transmitters:
CBX-1-FM Bonnyville
CBX-2-FM Edmonton
CBXA-FM Chateh
CBXC-FM Grande Cache (formerly CBXC Grande Cache)
CBXD-FM Edson (formerly CBXD Edson)
CBXF-FM Fort Vermilion (formerly CBKC Fort Vermilion)
CBXG-FM Peace River
CBXH-FM Jean d’Or
CBXI-FM Hinton
CBXJ-FM Jasper
CBXK-FM Fox Lake
CBXL-FM High Level (formerly CBKD High Level)
CBXM-FM Manning
CBXN-FM Fort McMurray
CBXP-FM Grande Prairie
CBXS-FM Swan Hills
CBXV-FM Fox Creek
CBXW-FM Rainbow Lake (formerly CBXX Rainbow Lake)
Saskatchewan CBK Regina and its transmitters:
CBKM-FM Meadow Lake
CBKR-FM Regina
CBK-1-FM Saskatoon
CBKA‐FM La Ronge and its transmitters:
CBDH-FM Uranium City
CBKA-FM-1 Creighton
CBKB-FM Beauval
CBKC-FM Île-à-la-Crosse
CBKD-FM Buffalo Narrows
CBKE-FM La Loche
CBKG-FM Fond du Lac
CBKH-FM Stony Rapids/Black Lake
CBKI-FM Stanley Mission
CBKJ-FM Pinehouse Lake
CBKK-FM Patuanak
CBKL-FM Montreal Lake
CBKN-FM Island Falls
CBKO-FM Denare Beach
CBKP-FM Southend
CBKV-FM Cumberland House
CBKW-FM Pelican Narrows
Manitoba CBW Winnipeg and its transmitters:
CBW-1-FM Winnipeg
CBWA-FM Manigotagan
CBWV-FM Brandon
CBWW-FM Dauphin
CBWX-FM Fisher Branch
CBWY-FM Jackhead
CBWZ-FM Fairford
CBWK‐FM Thompson and its transmitters:
CBDE-FM Brochet
CBDG-FM Shamattawa
CBDI-FM Poplar River
CBDS-FM Pukatawagan
CBDU-FM Lynn Lake
CBWB-FM Wabowden
CBWC-FM Moose Lake
CBWD-FM Waasagomach
CBWE-FM Easterville
CBWF-FM Flin Flon
CBWG-FM Gillam
CBWH-FM Grand Rapids
CBWI-FM Ilford
CBWJ-FM The Pas
CBWL-FM Snow Lake
CBWM-FM Oxford House
CBWN-FM Gods Lake Narrows
CBWO-FM Nelson House
CBWP-FM Leaf Rapids
CBWQ-FM South Indian Lake
CBWR-FM Little Grand Rapids
CBWU-FM Cranberry Portage
CHFC Churchill
Ontario CBCL‐FM London and its transmitter:
CBCL-FM-1 Tillsonburg
CBCS‐FM Sudbury and its transmitters:
CBCA-FM Attawapiskat
CBCC-FM Hearst
CBCE-FM Little Current
CBCG-FM Elk Lake
CBCI-FM Fort Albany
CBCJ-FM Timmins
CBCN-FM North Bay
CBCR-FM Kirkland Lake
CBCS-FM-1 Temagami (formerly CBEU Temagami)
CBCU-FM Chapleau
CBCY-FM Temiskaming Shores (formerly CBCY-FM Haileybury)
CBEC-FM Elliot Lake
CBEY-FM Moosonee (formerly CBEY Moosonee)
CBEZ-FM Britt
CBLF Foleyet
CBLJ-FM Wawa
CBLO Mattawa
CBOK-FM Kapuskasing
CBSM-FM Sault Ste. Marie
CBEW Windsor and its transmitters:
CBEE-FM Chatham
CBEG-FM Sarnia
CBEW-FM-1 Leamington
CBLA‐FM Toronto and its transmitters:
CBCB-FM Owen Sound
CBCM-FM Penetanguishene
CBCO-FM Orillia
CBCP-FM Peterborough
CBLA-FM-1 Crystal Beach
CBLA-FM-3 Wingham
CBLA-FM-4 Shelburne
CBLA-FM-5 Bancroft (formerly CBLV Bancroft)
CBLR-FM Parry Sound
CBLU-FM Huntsville
CBLY-FM Haliburton
CBOD-FM Maynooth
CBLA-FM-2 Kitchener/Bancroft (formerly CBLA-FM-2 Paris)
CBO‐FM Ottawa and its transmitters:
CBCD-FM Pembroke
CBCD-FM-1 Deep River (formerly CBLI Deep River)
CBCK-FM Kingston
CBCW-FM Whitney
CBO-FM-1 Belleville (not yet in operation)
CBOB-FM Brockville
CBOC-FM Cornwall
CBOM Maniwaki, Quebec
CBQT‐FM Thunder Bay and its transmitters:
CBCF-FM Fort Hope
CBEA-FM Red Lake
CBEB-FM Manitouwadge
CBES Ignace
CBLB Schreiber
CBLE Beardmore
CBLG-FM Geraldton
CBLM-FM Marathon (formerly CBLM Marathon and CBEH Terrace Bay)
CBLN-FM Nakina (formerly CBLN Nakina)
CBLS-FM Sioux Lookout (formerly CBLS Sioux Lookout and CBQW Hudson)
CBLW White River (to be replaced by CBLW-FM White River, not yet in operation)
CBOI Ear Falls (to be replaced by CBOI-FM Ear Falls, not yet in operation)
CBQH-FM Dryden
CBQI-FM Atikokan
CBQL-FM Savant Lake
CBQN-FM Osnaburgh
CBQP-FM Pickle Lake
CBQQ-FM Fort Frances
CBQS-FM Sioux Narrows
CBQT-FM-1 Hornepayne (formerly CBLH Hornepayne)
CBQT-FM-2 Armstrong (formerly CBOL Armstrong)
CBQU-FM Pikangikum
CBQV-FM Sandy Lake
CBQX-FM Kenora
CBQY-FM Nipigon
Quebec CBME‐FM Montréal and its transmitters:
CBME-FM-1 Montréal
CBMG-FM Cowansville
CBVE‐FM Québec and its transmitters:
CBJE-FM Chicoutimi
CBMA-FM Rouyn-Noranda
CBMB-FM Sherbrooke
CBMC-FM Thetford Mines
CBMD Chapais
CBMF-FM Mont-Tremblant (formerly CBMF-FM Saint-Jovite)
CBMH-FM Schefferville
CBMI-FM Baie-Comeau
CBMJ-FM Murdochville (formerly CBMJ Murdochville)
CBMK-FM Lebel-sur-Quévillon (formerly CBMK Lebel-sur-Quévillon)
CBMM-FM Senneterre (formerly CBMM Senneterre)
CBMN-FM Malartic (formerly CBMN Malartic and CBML Val d’Or)
CBMP-FM Chisasibi (Fort-George)
CBMQ-FM Waskaganish
CBMR-FM Fermont
CBMS-FM Blanc Sablon
CBMT-FM Gros-Mécatina (formerly CBMT-FM La Tabatière)
CBMU-FM Harrington Harbour
CBMV-FM Vieux-Fort (formerly CBMV-FM Old Fort Bay)
CBMW-FM Wemindji (Nouveau-Comptoir)
CBMX-FM Saint-Augustin
CBMY-FM Bonne-Espérance (formerly CBMY-FM Rivière-Saint-Paul)
CBMZ-FM Trois-Rivières
CBSE-FM Sept-Îles
CBVA-FM Escuminac
CBVB-FM Chandler
CBVC-FM Chibougamau
CBVE-1-FM La Tuque (formerly CBVE-1 La Tuque)
CBVF-FM Port-Daniel-Gascons (formerly CBVF-FM Port-Daniel (Est))
CBVG-FM Gaspé
CBVM-FM Îles-de-la-Madeleine
CBVN-FM New Carlisle
CBVP-FM Percé
CBVR-FM New Richmond
CBVS-FM Mistissini
CBVW-FM Waswanipi
New Brunswick CBAM‐FM Moncton and its transmitters:
CBAA-FM Allardville
CBAE-FM Campbellton
CBAM-FM-1 Sackville
CBD‐FM Saint John and its transmitters:
CBD-FM-1 St. Stephen (formerly CBAO St. Stephen)
CBZA-FM Grand Manan
CBZF‐FM Fredericton and its transmitters:
CBAN-FM Edmundston
CBZB-FM Boiestown
CBZC-FM Bon Accord
CBZD-FM Doaktown
CBZF-FM-1 McAdam (formerly CBAX McAdam)
CBZW-FM Woodstock
Nova Scotia CBHA‐FM Halifax and its transmitters:
CBAP-FM Shelburne
CBAZ-FM Sheet Harbour
CBHA-FM-1 Digby (not yet in operation)
CBHB-FM Mulgrave
CBHC-FM Truro
CBHL-FM Liverpool
CBHM-FM Middleton
CBHN-FM New Glasgow
CBHY-FM Yarmouth
CBI Sydney and its transmitters:
CBHF-FM Northeast Margaree
CBHI-FM Inverness
CBIB-FM Bay St. Lawrence
CBIC-FM Cheticamp
CBIS-FM Sydney
Prince Edward Island CBCT‐FM Charlottetown and its transmitters:
CBCT-FM-1 St. Edward
CBCT-FM-2 Elmira
Newfoundland and Labrador CBDQ‐FM Labrador City
CBG Gander and its transmitters:
CBGC-FM Carmanville
CBGY Bonavista Bay
CBNG-FM Glovertown
CBN St. John’s and its transmitters:
CBN-1-FM St. John’s
CBNL-FM Clarenville
CBNM-FM Marystown
CBNO-FM Swift Current
CBNQ-FM Trepassey
CBNR-FM Ramea
CBNS-FM St. Alban’s
CBNU-FM Fermeuse
CBNV-FM Placentia
CBNX-FM St. Vincent’s
CBT Grand Falls/Windsor (formerly CBT Grand Falls) and its transmitters:
CBTB-FM Baie Verte
CBTJ-FM Hampden
CBTL-FM Millertown
CBTR-FM Roddickton
CBY Corner Brook and its transmitters:
CBDT-FM Deer Lake
CBNA-FM St. Anthony (formerly CBNA St. Anthony)
CBNC-FM Stephenville
CBNE-FM Port-aux-Basques
CBNF-FM Bonne Bay
CBNH-FM St. Andrew’s
CBNJ-FM Port Saunders
CBYM-FM Mount St. Margaret
CBYP-FM Portland Creek
CFGB‐FM Happy Valley-Goose Bay (formerly CFGB-FM Goose Bay) and its transmitters:
CBGF-FM Fox Harbour
CBND-FM Postville
CBNI-FM Makkovik
CBNN-FM Hopedale
CBNP-FM Port Hope Simpson
CBNZ-FM Nain (formerly CBNZ Nain)
CBQA-FM Churchill Falls
CFGB-FM-1 Cartwright (formerly CBNK Cartwright)
CKZN-SW St. John’s
Yukon CFWH-FM Whitehorse and its transmitters:
CBDB Watson Lake
CBDC-FM Mayo (formerly CBDC Mayo)
CBDF-FM Haines Junction
CBDK Teslin
CBDL-FM Destruction Bay
CBDM Beaver Creek (Takhini River Subdivision)
CBDN Dawson
CBQF Carmacks
CBQJ Ross River
CBQK-FM Faro
CBUA-FM Atlin, British Columbia
CFWH-FM-1 Whitehorse
Northwest Territories CFYK Yellowknife and its transmitters:
CBAU-FM Fort Providence (formerly CBQC Fort Providence)
CBDJ-FM Hay River
CBDY-FM Fort Simpson (formerly CBDO Fort Simpson)
CBQB-FM Behchoko (formerly CBQB-FM Rae-Edzo)
CBQD-FM Fort Resolution
CBQG Wrigley
CBQO-FM Deline (Fort Franklin)
CBQZ-FM Fort Chipewyan, Alberta (formerly CBKE Fort Chipewyan, Alberta)
CFYK-FM-1 Fort Smith (formerly CBDI Fort Smith)
CHAK Inuvik and its transmitters:
CBAC-FM Tuktoyaktuk (formerly CBAC Tuktoyaktuk)
CBAH-FM Fort McPherson (formerly CBQM Fort McPherson)
CBAK Aklavik
CBDW-FM Norman Wells
CBIN-FM Cambridge Bay, Nunavut
CBIO-FM Kugluktuk (Coppermine), Nunavut
CBQE-FM Fort Good Hope
CBXY-FM Tulita (formerly CBQI Tulita)
Nunavut CBQR‐FM Rankin Inlet and its transmitters:
CBIA Gjoa Haven
CBIG-FM Arviat (Eskimo Point)
CBIQ-FM Taloyoak (Spence Bay)
CBQR-FM-1 Baker Lake
CFFB Iqaluit and its transmitters:
CBIH-FM Cape Dorset
CBII-FM Igloolik
CBIJ-FM Pangnirtung
CBIK-FM Pond Inlet
CBIL-FM Resolute Bay
CFFB-1-FM Cambridge Bay
CFFB-2-FM Kugluktuk (Coppermine)
CFFB-FM-3 Iqaluit
CFFB-FM-4 Kuujjuarapik, Quebec
CFFB-FM-5 Kuujjuaq, Quebec
CFFB-FM-6 Inukjuaq, Quebec
CFFB-FM-7 Salluit, Quebec
CFFB-FM-8 Puvirnituq, Quebec
Radio Two (CBC Music)
Province Call sign / Location
British Columbia CBU‐FM Vancouver and its transmitters:
CBDN-FM Dawson City, Yukon
CBNY-FM Yellowknife, Northwest Territories (formerly CFYK-FM Yellowknife, Northwest Territories)
CBU-FM-1 Victoria
CBU-FM-2 Metchosin/Sooke
CBU-FM-3 Kelowna
CBU-FM-4 Kamloops
CBU-FM-5 Prince George
CBU-FM-6 Quesnel
CBU-FM-7 Chilliwack
CBU-FM-8 Whitehorse, Yukon
Alberta CBR‐FM Calgary and its transmitters:
CBBC-FM Lethbridge
CBR-FM-1 Red Deer
CBX‐FM Edmonton
Saskatchewan CBK‐FM Regina and its transmitters:
CBK-FM-1 Prince Albert
CBK-FM-2 Warmley
CBK-FM-3 Yorkton
CBK-FM-4 Swift Current
CBK-FM-5 North Battleford
CBKS-FM Saskatoon
Manitoba CBW‐FM Winnipeg and its transmitter:
CBWS-FM Brandon
Ontario CBBS‐FM Sudbury
CBE‐FM Windsor
CBL‐FM Toronto and its transmitters:
CBBK-FM Kingston
CBBL-FM London
CBBP-FM Peterborough
CBL-FM-1 Huntsville
CBL-FM-2 Kitchener/Brantford (formerly CBL-FM-2 Paris)
CBL-FM-3 Orillia
CBL-FM-4 Owen Sound
CBOQ‐FM Ottawa
CBQ‐FM Thunder Bay
Quebec CBM‐FM Montréal and its transmitters:
CBM-FM-1 Sherbrooke
CBM-FM-2 Québec
CBM-FM-3 Iqaluit, Nunavut
Nova Scotia CBH‐FM Halifax and its transmitters:
CBA-FM Moncton, New Brunswick
CBCH-FM Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island
CBH-FM-1 Middleton
CBH-FM-2 Mulgrave
CBZ-FM Fredericton/Saint John, New Brunswick
CBI‐FM Sydney
Newfoundland and Labrador CBN-FM St. John’s and its transmitters:
CBN-FM-1 Grand Falls-Windsor
CBN-FM-2 Corner Brook
CBN-FM-3 Deer Lake
CBN-FM-4 Stephenville
CBN-FM-5 Marystown
CBN-FM-6 Baie Verte

Appendix 2 to Broadcasting Notice of Consultation CRTC 2019-379

Proposed amendments to, additions of and deletions of conditions of licence and expectations

Application 2019-0282-5 – English-language audio-visual services

Programs of national interest

The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (the Corporation) is currently required to adhere to the following condition of licence:

The licensee shall broadcast a minimum of 9 hours per week, averaged over the broadcast year, in prime time (7 p.m. to 11 p.m.) of programs of national interest, which consist of programs drawn from category 2(b) Long-form documentary, and 7 Drama and comedy, and specified Canadian award shows that celebrate Canadian talent.

Of these 9 hours a minimum of:

The licensee is proposing to amend that condition of licence as follows (changes in bold):

The licensee shall broadcast a minimum of 7 hours per week, averaged over the broadcast year, in prime time (7 p.m. to 11 p.m.) of programs of national interest, which consist of programs drawn from category 2(b) Long-form documentary, and 7 Drama and comedy, and specified Canadian award shows that celebrate Canadian talent.

Of these 7 hours a minimum of 80% shall be Canadian programs produced by independent production companies.

The Corporation is also proposing the addition of the following expectation in relation to the amended condition of licence:

The Commission expects the licensee to broadcast at least 10 hours per week of programs of national interest on either the network or on digital platforms owned and operated by the licensee.

Children’s programming

The Corporation is currently required to adhere to the following condition of licence:

The licensee shall broadcast a minimum of 15 hours per week, averaged over the broadcast year, of Canadian programming aimed at children under 12 years of age.

Of these 15 hours, a minimum of one hour, averaged over the broadcast year, shall be devoted to original Canadian programming. For the purposes of this condition, “original Canadian programming” means:

  1. a Canadian program that, at the time of its broadcast by the licensee, has not been previously broadcast by the licensee or by any other licensee; or
  2. if the licensee contributed to the program’s pre-production financing, a Canadian program that has only been previously broadcast by another licensee that also contributed to its pre-production financing.

At least 75% of these hours must be devoted to programs produced by independent production companies.

The licensee is proposing to amend that condition of licence as follows (changes in bold):

The licensee shall broadcast a minimum of 15 hours per week, averaged over the broadcast year, of Canadian programming aimed at children under 13 years of age.

The licensee shall broadcast a minimum of 40 hours per year of original Canadian programming aimed at children and youth.

For the purposes of this condition, “original Canadian programming” means:

  1. a Canadian program that, at the time of its broadcast by the licensee, has not been previously broadcast by the licensee or by any other licensee; or
  2. if the licensee contributed to the program’s pre-production financing, a Canadian program that has only been previously broadcast by another licensee that also contributed to its pre-production financing.

At least 80% of these hours must be devoted to programs produced by independent production companies.

The Corporation is also proposing the addition of the following expectation in relation to the amended condition of licence:

The Commission expects the licensee to broadcast at least 80 hours of original programming for children and youth per year either on the network or on digital platforms owned and operated by the licensee.

Local programming

The Corporation is currently required to adhere to the following condition of licence:

If the licensee operates in a:

  1. metropolitan market as defined in Regulatory frameworks for broadcasting distribution undertakings and discretionary programming services – Regulatory Policy, Broadcasting Public Notice CRTC 2008-100, 30 October 2008 (Broadcasting Public Notice 2008-100), the licensee shall broadcast at least 14 hours of Canadian local programming per week. Of these 14 hours, at least 1 hour per week shall consist of non-news local programming.
  2. non-metropolitan market as defined in Broadcasting Public Notice 2008-100, the licensee shall broadcast at least seven hours of Canadian local programming per week.

For the purpose of this condition of licence, “local programming” means programming produced by local stations with local personnel or programming produced by locally based independent producers that reflects the particular needs and interests of the market’s residents.

The licensee is proposing to amend that condition of licence as follows (changes in bold):

If the licensee operates in a:

  1. metropolitan market as defined in Regulatory frameworks for broadcasting distribution undertakings and discretionary programming services – Regulatory Policy, Broadcasting Public Notice CRTC 2008-100, 30 October 2008 (Broadcasting Public Notice 2008-100), the licensee shall broadcast at least 12 hours of Canadian local programming per week. Of these 14 hours, at least 1 hour per week shall consist of non-news local programming.
  2. non-metropolitan market as defined in Broadcasting Public Notice 2008-100, the licensee shall broadcast at least 5 hours of Canadian local programming per week.

For the purpose of this condition of licence, “local programming” means programming produced by local stations with local personnel or programming produced by locally based independent producers that reflects the particular needs and interests of the market’s residents.

The Corporation is also proposing the addition of the following expectation in relation to the amended condition of licence:

The Commission expects the licensee to broadcast at least 14.5 hours per week of local programming in metropolitan markets, and 7.5 hours per week of local programming in non-metropolitan markets, on either the station or on digital platforms owned and operated by the licensee.

CBC News Network

The Corporation is currently required to adhere to the following condition of licence:

The licensee shall charge distributors of this service in French-language markets a maximum monthly wholesale rate per subscriber of $0.15 when it is distributed as part of the digital basic service.

The licensee is proposing to amend that condition of licence as follows (changes in bold):

The licensee shall charge distributors of this service in French-language markets a maximum monthly wholesale rate per subscriber of $0.20 when it is distributed as part of the digital basic service.

Application 2019-0281-7 – French-language audio-visual services

Programs of national interest

The Corporation is currently required to adhere to the following condition of licence:

The licensee shall broadcast a minimum of seven hours per week, averaged over the broadcast year, in prime time (7 p.m. to 11 p.m.) of programs of national interest, which consist of programs drawn from categories 2(b) Long-form documentary, 7 Drama and comedy, 8(a) Music and dance other than music video programs or clips, 8(b) Music video clips, 8(c) Music video programs and 9 Variety, as well as specified Canadian award shows that celebrate Canadian creative talent.

At least 75% of these hours shall be devoted to Canadian programs produced by independent production companies.

The licensee is proposing to amend that condition of licence as follows (changes in bold):

The licensee shall broadcast a minimum of 6 hours per week, averaged over the broadcast year, in prime time (7 p.m. to 11 p.m.) of programs of national interest, which consist of programs drawn from categories 2(b) Long-form documentary, 7 Drama and comedy, 8(a) Music and dance other than music video programs or clips, 8(b) Music video clips, 8(c) Music video programs and 9 Variety, as well as specified Canadian award shows that celebrate Canadian creative talent.

At least 80% of these hours shall be devoted to Canadian programs produced by independent production companies.

The Corporation is also proposing the addition of the following expectation in relation to the amended condition of licence:

The Commission expects the licensee to broadcast at least 8 hours per week of programs of national interest on either the network or on digital platforms owned and operated by the licensee.

Children’s programming

The Corporation is currently required to adhere to the following condition of licence:

The licensee shall broadcast:

  1. a minimum of 15 hours per week, averaged over the broadcast year, of Canadian programming aimed at children under 12 years of age.
  2. a minimum of 100 hours per broadcast year of original Canadian programming aimed at children under 12 years of age.

For the purposes of this condition, “original Canadian programming” means:

  1. a Canadian program that, at the time of its broadcast by the licensee, has not been previously broadcast by the licensee or by any other licensee; or
  2. if the licensee contributed to the program’s pre-production financing, a Canadian program that has only been previously broadcast by another licensee that also contributed to its pre-production financing.

At least 75% of the hours set out in (a) and (b) shall be devoted to programs produced by independent production companies.

The licensee is proposing to amend that condition of licence as follows (changes in bold):

The licensee shall broadcast:

  1. a minimum of 15 hours per week, averaged over the broadcast year, of Canadian programming aimed at children under 13 years of age.
  2. a minimum of 80 hours per broadcast year of original Canadian programming aimed at children and youth.

For the purposes of this condition, “original Canadian programming” means:

  1. a Canadian program that, at the time of its broadcast by the licensee, has not been previously broadcast by the licensee or by any other licensee; or
  2. if the licensee contributed to the program’s pre-production financing, a Canadian program that has only been previously broadcast by another licensee that also contributed to its pre-production financing.

At least 80% of the hours set out in (a) and (b) shall be devoted to programs produced by independent production companies.

The Corporation is also proposing the addition of the following expectation in relation to the amended condition of licence:

The Commission expects the licensee to broadcast at least 110 hours of original programming for children and youth per year either on the network or on digital platforms owned and operated by the licensee.

ICI RDI

The Corporation is currently required to adhere to the following condition of licence:

The licensee shall charge distributors of this service in English-language markets a maximum monthly wholesale rate per subscriber of $0.10 when it is distributed as part of the digital basic service.

The licensee is proposing to amend that condition of licence as follows (change in bold):

The licensee shall charge distributors of this service in English-language markets a maximum monthly wholesale rate per subscriber of $0.13 when it is distributed as part of the digital basic service.

ICI ARTV

The Corporation is requesting the deletion of the following condition of licence as it is not asking the Commission to renew the mandatory distribution order for ARTV in the English-language market:Footnote 2

The licensee shall devote at least 20%, averaged over the licence term, of the annual budgets for original Canadian production to programs produced outside Quebec. At least 50% of these amounts shall be devoted to Canadian programs from independent production companies outside Quebec.

ICI EXPLORA

The Corporation is proposing the addition of the following condition of licence:

In each broadcast year, the licensee shall devote to the acquisition of or investment in Canadian programming at least 40% of the previous year’s gross revenues of the undertaking.

The Corporation is also proposing the addition of the following condition of licence:

In regard to expenditures on Canadian programming:

  1. In each broadcast year of the licence term, excluding the final year, the licensee may expend an amount on Canadian programming that is up to 5% less than the minimum required expenditure for that year calculated in accordance with condition of licence 2; in such case the licensee shall expend in the next broadcast year of the licence term, in addition to the minimum required expenditure for that year, the full amount of the previous year’s under-expenditure.
  2. In each broadcast year of the licence term, excluding the final year, where the licensee expends an amount for that year on Canadian programming that is greater than the minimum required expenditure, the licensee may deduct that amount from the minimum required expenditure in one or more of the remaining years of the licence term.
  3. Notwithstanding paragraphs (a) and (b) above, during the licence term, the licensee shall expend on Canadian programming, at a minimum, the total of the minimum required expenditures calculated in accordance with condition of licence 2.

Applications 2019-0282-5 and 2019-0281-7 (English- and French-language audio-visual services)

Children’s programming

The Corporation is requesting the deletion of the following expectations:

The Commission expects the licensee to broadcast a minimum of 5 hours per week, averaged over the broadcast year, of Canadian programming aimed at youth aged 12 to 17 years.

The Commission expects the hours of programming for children under 12 years of age to be reasonably allocated between programs for preschool and school-age children.

Applications 2019-0280-0, 2019-0279-2, 2019-0282-5 and 2019-0281-7 (English- and French-language audio services and audio-visual services)

Expectation to exceed minimum levels

The Corporation is requesting the deletion of the following expectation given that it is “proposing enhanced commitments spanning traditional and digital audio-visual platforms.”

The Commission expects the Corporation to exceed the minimum levels set out in conditions of licence, especially where those minimum levels are below the Corporation’s historical levels of programming and expenditures.

Original first-run programming

The Corporation is proposing the addition of the following condition of licence:

By 30 November of each year, the licensee shall provide a report, in a form acceptable to the Commission, reporting the number of hours of original, first-run Canadian programs broadcast by the network during the broadcast year.

For the purposes of this condition of licence, CBC/Radio-Canada may designate a Canadian program as “original, first-run” if the program has not previously been made available by any other Canadian broadcasting undertaking to the public anywhere in Canada either by means of a linear broadcast or on an on-demand basis, provided that if CBC/Radio-Canada contributed to a program’s production financing with third parties, it can be counted as “original, first-run” even if the third parties who contributed to its financing made it available on their platforms before it is made available on a CBC/Radio-Canada platform. 

In the event a program is made available by CBC/Radio-Canada on both a network and one or more of its digital platforms, CBC/Radio-Canada may choose which broadcast to designate as the “original, first-run” broadcast.

There would be one report for CBC’s English-language television network and online services and another for Radio-Canada’s French-language television network and online services. These reports would exclude news, current affairs and sports programming.

Date modified: