Canadian Program Certification Guide

This guide outlines the eligibility requirements and application process for Canadian program certification.

Table of contents

Canadian Programs: An Overview

What is a certified ‘Canadian’ program?

Programs certified as ‘Canadian’ are film and television productions that use mainly Canadian crews and talent.

What are the roles of the CRTC, CAVCO and Telefilm Canada in the certification process?

  • CRTC: Certifies domestic television and film productions, dubbed versions of Canadian and foreign programs, and international co-ventures (international co-productions that are not included under the treaties administered by Telefilm Canada). Producers seeking Canadian content certification, but who do not seek a federal tax credit, should apply to the CRTC.
  • Canadian Audio-Visual Certification Office (CAVCO): Certifies domestic television and film productions and international treaty co-productions applying for the Canadian film or video production tax credit (CPTC). CAVCO also issues accreditation certificates to taxable Canadian corporations or foreign-owned corporations applying for the Film or Video Production Services Tax Credit (PSTC). Producers seeking a federal tax credit should apply to CAVCO.
  • Telefilm Canada: Recommends international treaty co-productions that involve a Canadian-controlled production company and a producer in a country with which Canada has an official co-production treaty. Producers must apply first to Telefilm, and then to CAVCO to have the production certified as an international treaty co-production.

Why are Canadian productions certified?

A certain percentage of content broadcast and financed by CRTC-licensed television broadcasters must be made by Canadians. Broadcasters can only count programs with Canadian certification towards meeting these requirements.

What makes a production eligible to be certified as Canadian by the CRTC?

The CRTC only certifies Canadian film or television productions that meet the following criteria:

  • The producer must be a Canadian and must act as the central decision-maker from the development stage until the production is ready for commercial exploitation.
  • The production must earn a minimum number of points based on the key creative functions that are performed by Canadians. Usually, a minimum of 6 out of 10.
  • At least 75% of the production’s services costs must be paid to Canadians and at least 75% of the production’s post-production and laboratory costs must be paid for services provided in Canada by Canadians or Canadian companies.
  • The production must qualify for certification under an eligible program category.

What productions do not require CRTC certification?

Domestic productions and international treaty co-productions that get a CAVCO Part A or B certificate are automatically recognized as Canadian by the CRTC. These productions do not need to be submitted to the CRTC for certification.

Other types of productions that are automatically recognized as Canadian by the CRTC (as long as they meet the other eligibility criteria):

  • Programs produced in-house solely by a CRTC-licensed or exempt broadcaster.
  • Commercially released music video clips of 5 minutes or less.
  • Federal and provincial government productions.
  • Public service announcements, interstitials, and any other productions of less than 5 minutes.

What kinds of productions are not eligible for CRTC certification?

Certain productions are ineligible for certification as Canadian programs:

  • Infomercials, promotional and corporate videos/films (such as PR or recruitment productions by groups and businesses), and other forms of advertising material.
  • Repackaged or adapted versions of existing foreign productions or program segments that use some or all of the following:
    • Excerpts from an original foreign production.
    • A significant portion of the original foreign production in unedited or minimally edited chunks.
    • The mention of the original foreign production in the credits.
  • A production that contains more than 50% of non-Canadian stock footage with the exception of documentaries.

Is advertising content eligible to be certified as ‘Canadian’?

When it comes to certification, the CRTC assesses whether a production is intended to directly or indirectly promote a good or service (includes endorsement, message, advertisement, solicitation, product review, sponsorship beyond incidental use of a corporate name/logo, the use of addresses, telephone numbers or website addresses) by considering the balance between information, entertainment, and promotion.

If the CRTC determines that the intention of a production is to sell or promote, we consider that production to be advertising material, which is not eligible for Canadian program certification.

When analysing a production, we consider:

  • Whether the production has elements in its discussion or display of the subject matter that directly or indirectly serve to sell or promote goods or services.
  • Whether the production includes “ordering opportunities,” also known as “calls to action.”

    Example: An on-screen personality, voice-over, or text on the television screen encourages viewers to purchase goods or services featured in the program by providing contact information (including websites) to facilitate a sale.

For more information, see Broadcasting Information Bulletin CRTC 2017-434.

What about product reviews and incidental use of a product or service?

A program may still be eligible for Canadian program certification even if it mentions or displays a good or service, as long as the producer ensures there is no clear intention to sell or promote that good or service. The producer must also demonstrate that the mention or display of the good or service is necessary for providing information and reporting on the subject matter. Such content is typically found for example in unbiased objective review programs and expert commentary in information programming.

Applying for Certification

Before you apply

With the exception of live broadcasts*, you must meet the following three requirements to process your application:

  1. The principal photography has started.
  2. All key creative personnel are under signed contract.
  3. The committed budgets are in place.

*Live broadcasts: For live broadcasts, you must meet requirements 2 and 3 before you submit your application. Since live broadcasts are produced and broadcast simultaneously, we have waived requirement 1.

Choosing the right application form

Producers have 6 application forms to choose from. You can find all 6 application forms at Canadian Program Certification application forms.

Please note each form gives you a sample copy of the form to help you better understand the information you’ll need to provide, as well as giving you access to the actual application form. You must provide all of the required information and attach any appendices when you file your application.

  • Live Action - Form 206

  • Animation - Form 205

    • For animated productions other than continuous action animation (including domestic productions and international co-ventures).
    • Productions that mix both live action and animation: Submit the application form according to the predominant format of the program.
    • See Appendices for Animation (205) and Live Action (206) for more information about this form.
  • Dubbing - Form 201

    • For the dubbing of:
      • Canadian production certified by the CRTC
      • Foreign production
      • Canadian production recognized by CAVCO or Telefilm Canada
  • Live or Live-to-Tape Sports Events - Form 204

    • For a live or live-to-tape production of sports events and tournaments.
    • All other types of sports programs, such as documentaries on sports-related topics or programs on leisure and recreational sports are assessed under the point system and expenditure rules for live action productions. Applicants for certification of these types of sports programs must use Live Action - Form 206.
  • Twinning - Form 202

    • For twinned productions.
  • Production Package - Form 203

    • For production packages.

Appendices for Animation (205) and Live Action (206)

For Animation (205) and Live Action (206) applications, you may need to provide supporting documents. When you’re completing the application form, a message will prompt you if you need to provide supporting documents and will detail what information you must provide. You must submit all appendices when you file the application.

You can find all appendices at Canadian Program Certification application forms.

Submitting your application form

You must submit your application online using your My CRTC Account. Here’s how:

  1. Get an activation code

    If this is your first submission for certification with the CRTC, you need an activation code to register for your My CRTC Account. You can get an activation code by calling the CRTC Monday to Friday (except holidays) from 07:00 to 18:00 Eastern Standard Time at:

    • 1-866-893-0932
    • TTY (toll free) 1-877-909-2782
    • For DCS: 819-997-4597

    Once you have your activation code, you can register online for your My CRTC Account.

  2. Log in to your My CRTC Account

    If you already have a My CRTC Account, simply log in using your username and password.

  3. Submit your application

    To submit application forms for Dubbing, Twinning, Production Package, Live or Live-to-Tape Sports Events, and Animation (Forms 201 to 205):

    1. Go to Canadian Program Certification Application Forms.
    2. Download the appropriate application form.
    3. Complete the form electronically and save it to your computer.
    4. Log into your My CRTC Account and complete the Canadian Program Certification Application Cover Page.
    5. Submit your application form and appendices, if applicable.

    To submit a Live Action application (Form 206): Please note that the Form 206 application is an electronic form ("SmartForm") that lets you complete your application online in your My CRTC Account as follows:

    1. Log into your My CRTC Account.
    2. Access the form and cover page at Canadian Program Certification Application 206 Online Form and Cover Page.
    3. Complete the form and cover page online.
    4. You can save your application in your My CRTC Account and make changes before submitting it. Note, however, that once you’ve submitted the application, you no longer have access to it.
    5. Before you submit your application, save a PDF version of it on your computer. You’re given this option on the final review page.
    6. Submit your application form and appendices, if applicable.

What happens after you submit your application

Once you submit your application, we e-mail you a confirmation ID within 24 hours. If you do not receive an e-mail confirmation, please contact us by telephone at 819-997-4699 or by e-mail Canadian Program Certification group. We process applications in the order in which we receive them.

In the case of incomplete information:

  • If your application is incomplete or missing required appendices at the time of submission, we’ll notify you by e-mail that the application has not been accepted.
  • If your application at the time of processing is incomplete, or if we need additional information, it could delay processing or cause the application to be returned. Additional information could include audited financial statements to confirm production costs, contracts or agreements to establish producer control, affidavits for non-Canadian courtesy credits, independent legal opinions, proof of citizenship or certificates of permanent residency, invoices, or a link of the program.
  • If we don’t receive the additional information within a reasonable amount of time, we will return your application. If you choose to re-submit it, it goes back into the queue to be processed in the order in which it was received.

In the case of incorrect/amended information:

  • We make certification decisions based on the information in the application and supporting documentation. If any of the information is subsequently found to be inaccurate or incomplete, or if the production evolves significantly from what is represented in the application, we reserve the right to revoke the certification.
  • If, after submitting the application or after the application is certified, you amend the original production, you are responsible for advising the certification group. This would be the case, for example, if you add episodes to a season, add someone occupying a key creative role to the production, or create another duration of the production.

Receiving your certification letter

If the CRTC approves your application, we send your certification letter to the e-mail address you provided in section 2.1 of the application form.

You must provide a copy of the certification letter to the broadcaster that is broadcasting the production.

If there are any material changes to the production or if you have questions regarding the certification after the production has been certified, please contact the CRTC’s Certification Group.

Ongoing supervision by CRTC

As part of its supervision mandate, the CRTC monitors the broadcast of certified productions. If the CRTC determines that any material changes, omissions, inaccurate statements or the inclusion of non-certifiable program material has taken place, such that the program no longer meets the parameters under which it was certified, the original certification will be revoked.

Certification Numbers and Time Credits

Certification Numbers - Definition

When a production is certified as a Canadian program by the CRTC, it is assigned a certification number:

  • C: A domestic Canadian production or the dubbing of a Canadian production.
  • SR (special recognition): An international co-venture.
  • D: Dubbing of a foreign production.

If the production is a series:

  • Individual certification numbers are issued for each season of a series; you must therefore submit an application form for each season.

If there is more than one duration or language version:

  • Re-cut versions of differing lengths or multiple language versions require a separate certification number for each version. The application allows you to include different durations and language versions.

Time Credits - Definition

When a production is certified, it also receives a time credit that will be used by broadcasters to meet certain CRTC regulatory requirements.

The time credit refers to the actual running time that a broadcaster can claim as Canadian content in its program logs. This timeframe will usually represent 100% of the program duration, with some exceptions as noted below.

Certification Numbers and Time Credits by Production Type

Domestic Productions

A domestic Canadian production that meets the certification eligibility requirements receives a “C” number and a 100% time credit. The majority of applications to certify original programs fall into this category.

150% Dramatic Program Credit

A broadcaster will receive a 150% time credit for each airing of a qualifying drama within a two-year period from the date of the first program broadcast. Productions that are a series are eligible for the credit for a single two-year period for each cycle of the series, starting with the broadcast of the first episode of that cycle.

In order to be eligible for the 150% time credit, the drama production must meet the following criteria:

  1. It contains a minimum of 90% dramatic content.
  2. It achieves 10 points.
  3. Proof of citizenship is provided with the application for all Canadian persons filling the role of the producer, producer-related personnel, and all individuals filling key creative positions.

Dubbed Productions

Dubbed productions include certified Canadian productions and foreign productions whose audio is converted in Canada, using Canadian resources, into either official language of Canada or an Indigenous Canadian language by lip synchronization or voice-over.

The dubbing time credit is valid for a period of two years from the date of first broadcast of the dubbed version. After this period, the dubbed version receives the same time credit as the original version.

Productions that use subtitles are not eligible for the dubbing credit.

Canadian productions dubbed in Canada:
  • Receive a “C” number for a certified Canadian production dubbed in Canada, along with a supplementary time credit of 33% of that for the original production.

    Example: a certified Canadian production dubbed from English to French.

  • To be considered a Canadian production, the original production must be certified by the CRTC or CAVCO (with a Part A or B certificate).
Foreign productions dubbed in Canada:
  • Receive a “D” number for the dubbing in Canada of a foreign program along with a time credit based on the duration of the original program. Two possible time credits are available for this type of production:
    1. Foreign production dubbed from an official language of Canada or an Indigenous Canadian language into the other official language of Canada or an Indigenous Canadian language: broadcaster may claim a 33% Canadian time credit.

      Example: a foreign production dubbed from English to French or Cree.

    2. Foreign production dubbed from a language other than an official language of Canada or an Indigenous Canadian language into an official language of Canada or an Indigenous Canadian language: broadcaster may claim a 50% Canadian time credit.

      Example: a production dubbed from Japanese to English, French or Cree.

Canadian productions dubbed outside Canada
  • No additional time credits are given to Canadian productions dubbed outside of Canada. Broadcasters can claim the time credit associated with the original version of the program.

Live or Live-to-Tape Productions of Sports Events

Live or live-to-tape productions of sports events or tournaments are considered Canadian if a Canadian production company exercises control over the production and provides the commentators. If the event takes place outside Canada, the production can qualify only if Canadian-based teams or athletes participate. In all cases, one of the major on-camera personalities (commentators, analysts or hosts) must be Canadian. Those who qualify receive a “C” number and are eligible for a 25% time credit.

One-quarter (25%) of the program time of broadcasts of sports events originating outside Canada that involve only non-Canadian teams or athletes is recognized as Canadian if a Canadian producer or production company provides commentary in a language other than English.

International Co-Ventures

International co-ventures involving Canadian and foreign producers are assigned an “SR” number by the CRTC. These productions include:

  • Ventures with co-producers from a foreign country that does not have a film or television production treaty with Canada.
  • Ventures with co-producers of a treaty country that do not otherwise meet Telefilm Canada’s eligibility requirements.

International co-ventures offer greater flexibility for Canadian producers who wish to work with foreign producers, by sharing creative and financial decision-making responsibilities.

Although non-Canadians can be credited as “producers” on international co-ventures, in order to be certified as Canadian, the director or the screenwriter/scriptwriter and at least one of the two lead performers must be Canadian. These productions must also score a minimum of 6 key creative points, as well as meeting specific eligibility requirements:

  • As with domestic productions, a minimum of 75% of the co-venture production’s services costs incurred to produce the production must be paid to Canadians and at least 75% of the co-venture production’s post-production and laboratory costs must be paid for services provided in Canada by Canadians or Canadian companies.
  • An application for CRTC certification as an international co-venture must be submitted by the Canadian production company, and must be accompanied by a signed co-venture agreement.
  • The relationship between the Canadian and non-Canadian producers must respect the following criteria:
  1. Decision-making responsibility:

    For international co-ventures, the Canadian production company must have no less than equal measure of decision-making responsibility with partners on all creative elements of the production and must be responsible for administering the Canadian element of the production budget. The Canadian production company must also have either sole or co-signing authority on the production bank account:

    • Co-ventures shot entirely in Canada: The production bank account must be in Canada.
    • Co-ventures shot partially in Canada: The elements of the portion shot in Canada are paid from a Canadian bank account.
    • Co-ventures shot entirely outside Canada: The Canadian elements of the program are paid from a Canadian bank account.
  2. Financial participation and profit-sharing:

    The Canadian production company in a co-venture must retain financial participation of at least 50%. This means that at least 50% of the financing required for the production must have been raised or acquired by the Canadian production company. It may take the form of licence fees, equity, debt, production fund funding, etc. The Canadian production company must also retain the right to at least 50% of the profits.

  3. Special recognition co-venture - Exceptions

    A co-venture involving a co-producer from a Commonwealth or French-speaking country, or a country with which Canada has a film or television production treaty, may be considered for special recognition. We will grant Canadian certification if, in addition to meeting the foregoing requirements:

    • The program attains 5 points.
    • At least 50% of the costs for services are paid to Canadians.
    • At least 50% of post-production and laboratory costs (except for the picture editor) are paid for services provided in Canada by Canadians or by Canadian companies.

    In addition to the above, the director or the writer and at least one of the two lead performers must be Canadian. All other criteria for certification of a Canadian program still apply to such co-ventures.

Production Packages and Twinning

  • Production package: Two or more co-productions or co-ventures by a Canadian production company with one or more non-Canadian production companies, where a production with minor foreign involvement that qualifies as a Canadian production is matched with a foreign production with minor Canadian involvement.
  • Minor foreign involvement: Any amount up to the maximum foreign involvement that a co-venture could have and still qualify as Canadian under the CRTC’s co-venture criteria.
  • Minor Canadian involvement: A minimum of 20% financial participation and profit sharing, but can be any amount up to the maximum a foreign co-production or co-venture could have before it no longer qualifies as Canadian under the CRTC’s co-venture criteria.
  • Twinning: Matching a fully Canadian production with a foreign production that has virtually no Canadian involvement other than financial.
What qualifies as a Canadian production package or twinning production?

The following conditions must be met in order for the production package or twinning to qualify as Canadian:

  1. The Canadian copyright for both productions is held by Canadians.
  2. The budgets of both Canadian and foreign productions are approximately equal, within 15%.
  3. Co-production agreements/contracts between the Canadian production company and the foreign producers are submitted to the CRTC with the applications.
  4. The Canadian production company must have financial participation and profit sharing (at least 20%) in the Canadian and foreign productions.
  5. A broadcaster may receive credit for a production with fewer Canadian elements if it broadcasts the production with more Canadian elements at an equitable time.
  6. All productions in production packages and twinnings must fall within the same program category.
  7. Production package or twinning programs are acceptable only in the categories of drama and comedy, variety, documentary and children's. Animated productions are excluded.
  8. Matched (or twinned) productions must be approximately equal in duration.
  9. Matched (or twinned) productions must receive equitable scheduling on the same Canadian station or network.
  10. 10-point productions in production packages or a twinning will not qualify for the dramatic program credit of 150%.

While there is no requirement that the production with major Canadian involvement receive exposure in the other country, we expect that the Canadian co-producer would include such an arrangement in the agreement with the non-Canadian co-producer.

We assign a “C” or “SR” number for a production package or a twinning.

Eligibility

Key Creative Definitions and Requirements

Live Action or Continuous Action Animation Productions

For the purpose of Canadian program certification, continuous action animation is treated the same as live action programs.

Director

Person who controls the action and dialogue in front of the camera and is therefore responsible for realizing the intentions of the scripted concept.

Screenwriter

The role of the writer includes screenwriters, scriptwriters, story editors, creative consultants, story consultants, and creative producers.

All individuals involved in any stage of developing the screenplay (including outline or treatment, various drafts, dialogue polishing, and final shooting script) must be Canadian, or alternatively, the principal writer must be Canadian, and the screenplay must be based on a work authored by a Canadian and published in Canada.

In the case of a dance production, the choreographer will be considered to be equivalent to the writer.

First and Second Lead Performers or Voices

Lead performers speak lines of dialogue, mime a scene, or interpret a character even where there is no dialogue.

For variety, music and dance productions, the leads are the musical performers, singers, or dancers, etc. The host of these productions is not considered a lead performer unless the host also performs.

In other program types, the leads will usually be the host, narrator, moderator, quizmaster, commentator or interviewer (a performer engaged to perform narrative material or commentary on- or off-camera), off-camera performer (a performer other than the narrator or commentator engaged to perform a role in a dramatic work off-camera), or the person who performs or reads the voice of a character in a film or animated production.

Guests on a magazine program, or the subjects of biographical documentaries, are not considered performers for certification purposes.

At least one of the two lead performers must be Canadian. A production in which one or more non-Canadians are the only lead performers will not be certified as Canadian. Adding Canadians in minor roles is not sufficient for a production to qualify.

Determining lead performers must take into account billing, screen-time and remuneration.

In non-dramatic productions, the second lead must have at least 50% of the on-screen time (or off-screen time where narrators or interviewers are involved) and at least 50% of the remuneration of the first lead, plus billing appropriate for a second lead, in order to be awarded the point. Individuals not meeting these criteria are considered to be filling minor roles.

Production Designer or Art Director

The individual in charge of a production's artistic design, which consists of everything that appears on the screen, including sets, costumes and properties. This person is generally responsible for the conception, planning and supervision of the overall visual design of the production.

For a live action or continuous action animated production, the Art Director is considered equivalent to the Production Designer.

Director of Photography (“DOP”) or Chief Camera Operator

The individual(s) in charge of the camera and lighting crews working on a film. This person is responsible for making artistic and technical decisions related to the image.

If there is no DOP, the equivalent is Chief Camera Operator.

Music Composer

This point is only awarded if the production commissions a Canadian to compose original music specifically for the production. Music composed by Canadians for the first season of a television series may also be claimed for the music composer point for subsequent seasons.

Rearranging existing music, even if it is Canadian, uses the position but does not earn the point. The production can use existing music in addition to the original music.

The position of Music Director is not accepted as equivalent to Music Composer.

No point is given when producers use existing music and do not engage the services of a Canadian music composer to create original music for the production being certified.

Picture Editor

The person responsible for synchronizing and cutting together a work's various visual and sound elements recorded at different times, whether in a studio or elsewhere.

The equivalent of the Picture Editor is the Film Editor.

The positions of Sound or Music Editor are not accepted in place of the Picture Editor. For videotape productions, the equivalent to Picture Editor is the Off-line Editor.

Animation Productions

Animation is the process of creating an illusion of motion using still images.

Director

Has overall control of the creative aspects of the production, creates the instructional workbook for the production, times the action and supervises the creative and technical aspects of the work, provides shot-by-shot and frame-by-frame details of the camera movement and shot punctuation by preparing the timing of each individual scene at the storyboard stage, and prepares the bar-sheets or exposure sheet instructions for the animator. These functions may also be performed by, or in collaboration with, the key animator or animation director.

Scriptwriter and Storyboard Supervisor

The scriptwriter provides the written treatment, outlines the continuity of the story, dialogue or action and the parts the various characters will play in it, and elaborates on the script during the storyboard stage.

The storyboard supervisor, in cooperation with or in place of the scriptwriter (depending on the type of production and studio organization), creates a series of pictures to illustrate the story in parallel with the written text, determines transitions from one scene to another, and creates a series of drawings showing the major action and scene changes.

In productions that employ scriptwriters or storyboard supervisors, but not both, the point will be awarded only if everyone performing the function is Canadian.

Picture Editor

Assembles individual shots and sequences in continuity and fits them to the various soundtracks, provides the sound effects track, analyses the music or dialogue track, informs animators about timed film frames, supervises the dubbing and the separate sound tracks, and liaises with laboratories to obtain prints.

First or Second Voice (or first or second lead performer)

To determine the lead performers in an animated production, the production must take into account the account billing, on-screen time (or off-screen time for voices), the number of lines, and payment.

Design Supervisor

Responsible for style, visual character, colour theme and colour continuity; develops the tones of the backgrounds, figures and textures; can sometimes create the actual characters jointly with the director; and prepares visual proportion charts of the characters to safeguard uniformity during the production.

This position is sometimes referred to as Art Director or Character Designer.

Camera Operator and Operation

Operates the camera for the purpose of recording the sequences of cells and backgrounds according to instructions from the director. Both the camera operator and the location of the camera operation must be Canadian to earn the point in an animated production.

Music Composer

See Live Action section above.

Key animation

The key animator is primarily responsible for the creative vitality of the production; draws the key phases of movement that determine the life and expression of the characters; creates the movement of figures or objects; roughs out the timing path or sequence of the animation; and provides, on dope sheets, technical information to the camera operator about the order in which her or she should photograph individual animation phases. The animator depicts extremes of movement to provide key drawings and sets the style and character of the sequence. The key animator's work is part of the final print.

Assistant animator and in-betweening

Completes the breakdown drawings and in-between work once the animator determines the key characters or figures and the animation is complete. Breakdown drawings are the main drawings between the key animation drawings that help to define the path of action. In-between drawings are done after the main path of action breakdown drawings is complete.

Layout artist and background artist

Working from the storyboard, they outline the graphic organization in the form of line drawings of background environment and staging of action for the animators' and background artists' reference. The layout artist also draws up camera field references. In feature work, the layout artist will also provide a detailed tonal rendering for the background department. The background layout provides finished backgrounds for individual scenes of a film. A related position is that of the poser. The poser, however, is an animator whose work is preliminary and ephemeral and does not form part of the final print.

Key Creative Point System

Point System - Definitions

Domestic productions, as well as international co-ventures, are awarded points when Canadians occupy certain key creative functions involved in making the production.

Canadian (individual)

A Canadian citizen as defined in the Citizenship Act or a permanent resident as defined in the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act who has received a Permanent Residence Certificate.

An individual must have citizenship or permanent residency before the start of principal photography and must retain it until the end of post-production in order for us to award points to people in key creative positions.

Canadian (production company)

Either a licensee of the CRTC or a Canadian company carrying on business in Canada, with a Canadian business address, owned and controlled by Canadians.

Point System - Criteria

We award points for live action productions, continuous action animated productions, and animation productions based on key creative functions being performed by Canadians.

Productions must generally earn at least 6 points out of a possible 10 to be eligible for certification.

Of the minimum 6 points:

  • The director or screenwriter position (for live action or continuous action animated productions) or the scriptwriter or storyboard supervisor position (for animated productions) must be filled by a Canadian.
  • First or second lead performer position must be filled by a Canadian.
  • These mandatory points must be achieved for one-off productions and for each episode in a series.

Where multiple people share duties for a particular position, or multiple people share screen credits for a single position, the production only earns the point if all of the people are Canadian.

Example: For a production with 2 picture editors, one of whom is Canadian and the other non-Canadian, the position is considered non-Canadian and does not earn a point. Similarly, if there are 10 writers and one of those 10 writers is non-Canadian, the position is considered non-Canadian and doesn’t earn a point.

Point System – Points Awarded Per Key Creative Position

The points awarded for key creative positions filled by Canadians required to certify a Canadian production:

Live action and continuous action animated productions
  • Director (2 points)
  • Screenwriter (2 points)
  • First and Second Lead Performers (performer or voice) (1 point each)
  • Production Designer or Art Director (1 point)
  • Director of Photography or Chief Camera Operator (1 point)
  • Music Composer (1 point)
  • Picture Editor (1 point)
Animated productions (other than continuous action animation)
  • Scriptwriter and Storyboard Supervisor (1 point)
  • Director (1 point)
  • Picture Editor (1 point)
  • First or Second Voice (or first or second lead performer) (1 point)
  • Design Supervisor (1 point)
  • Camera Operator and Operation (1 point)
  • Music Composer (1 point)

In addition, animated productions are also awarded points when key creative functions are performed in Canada:

  • Key animation (1 point)
  • Layout artist and background (1 point)
  • Assistant animation/in-betweening (1 point)

For animation productions (excluding continuous action animated productions), it is mandatory that the following persons or locations are Canadian. Where the point is assigned to a location, it will be awarded only if that function is performed entirely in Canada.

  • The people occupying the role of the director, or the combination of scriptwriter/storyboard supervisor, must be Canadian.
  • The location of the key animation, excluding pixilation, must be in Canada.
  • The people occupying the role of the first or second lead performers or voices must be Canadian.
  • The people occupying the role of the camera operator must be Canadian, and the location of the camera operation, for pixilation only, must be done in Canada.

Point System - Exceptions

We do not award key creative points in the following cases:

  • Dubbed Canadian productions where the original production was certified by CAVCO.
  • Foreign productions dubbed in Canada.
  • Live or live-to-tape sports events.

We may grant certification in the following instances to productions that do not meet the minimum key creative point requirement:

  • Fully Canadian productions: In productions that do not use some key creative positions (such as documentaries), making it impossible to meet the 6-point minimum, we will grant Canadian certification provided that Canadians fill all key creative roles.

    Example: A documentary may earn 3/3 points or 5/5 points.

  • Co-ventures: A co-venture involving a co-producer from a Commonwealth or French-speaking country, or a country with which Canada has a film or television production treaty, may be considered for special recognition. We grant these productions Canadian certification if, among other requirements, the program attains 5 points.

    However, in such cases, the co-venture must also meet the normal co-venture requirements.

  • Series: The production elements of a series can vary, and some individual episodes might not meet the minimum requirements of the point system. Accordingly, we may certify any episodes in a series that do not meet the six-point requirement, so long as:
    • At least 60% of the series episodes attain 6 points or more.
    • The episodes are broadcast or otherwise distributed at equitable times.
    • The entire series attains an average of 6 points per episode.

    Episodes that are ineligible for certification for any reason will not be segregated from the remainder of the episodes.

  • Live action or continuous-action animated series: Each episode must meet the two mandatory requirements for screenwriter or director, and first or second lead performer (minimum of 3 points).
  • Animated series: Each episode must fulfill the three mandatory requirements for scriptwriter and storyboard supervisor or director, first or second voice/performer, and key animation (minimum of 3 points).

    Note that episodes that are ineligible for certification for any reason will not be segregated from the remainder of the episodes.

  • Sports productions: We do not award key creative points for productions of live or live-to-tape sports events. These type of productions are considered Canadian if a Canadian production company exercises control over the production and hires the commentators. If the event takes place outside Canada, the production would qualify only if Canadian-based teams or athletes participate. In all cases, one of the major on-camera personalities (commentators, analysts or hosts) must be Canadian.

Foreign Courtesy Credits

In order to ensure that Canadians are clearly recognized as the central decision-makers for a domestic production, in no circumstances can non-Canadians receive a producer, co-producer, line producer, or production manager credit.

Courtesy credits may be awarded to non-Canadians for non-creative, non-production-related functions that in no way interfere with the financial and creative authority of the Canadian producer and either relate to the arranging of foreign distribution or financing or services to the production under the strict supervision and control of the Canadian producer.

The CRTC’s approach to foreign courtesy credits differs from that of CAVCO. The CRTC does not allow any non-Canadian to receive a foreign courtesy credit if they are also credited as a writer for the production.

We review any courtesy credit given to a non-Canadian that does not appear in the list of Group A and B credits below, to ensure that their duties do not interfere in any way with the administrative, creative or financial decisions of the Canadian producer.

Accordingly, non-Canadians may only receive courtesy credits for producer-related functions as long as:

  • The remuneration to the Canadian producer(s) exceeds the aggregate remuneration to non-Canadians in producer-related positions.
  • With the exception of a non-Canadian lead performer, non-Canadians in producer-related positions must limit their time on the set to a maximum of 25% of principal photography and their role solely to that of observers.

Foreign Courtesy Credit - Groups

Note: If a non-Canadian receives a Group A credit, at least one Canadian must be given a Group A credit. If two non-Canadians are given a Group B credit, at least two Canadians must be given a credit from either Group A or Group B. Credits within the same group are interchangeable.

Group A:

Executive Producer

Senior Executive

Executive in Charge of Production

Supervising Producer

Associate Producer

Group B:

Supervising Executive

Production Supervisor

Production Executive

Production Associate

Executive Consultant

Production Consultant

Creative Consultant

Foreign Courtesy Credit - Affidavits

  • With the exception of a lead performer, all other non-Canadians granted a courtesy credit must file an affidavit outlining the duties they performed and declaring that those duties have been/will be carried out only under the direction, control, and with the full knowledge of the Canadian producer.
  • Non-Canadians in producer-related positions cannot assume any responsibility for the expenditure of any production money or order any goods or services of any kind in connection with the production.
  • Non-Canadians in producer-related positions cannot be present for more than 25% of principal photography.
  • Affidavits are required for all foreign courtesy credits.

Canadian Producer Control for Domestic Productions

To be certified as a domestic Canadian production, everyone receiving a producer credit must be Canadian. The producer must be the central decision-maker, from the development stage until the production is ready for commercial exploitation.

In all instances, producers must have Canadian citizenship or Canadian permanent residency before the start of principal photography and retain this status until the end of post-production.

We review chain-of-title documentation if necessary to confirm that a producer is responsible for developing the project. This documentation may include agreements with writers and producers, consultants and other production companies. These agreements demonstrate that the production company has the necessary rights for it to develop, produce and exploit the finished work.

We make allowances for industry-standard third-party approval rights, like those typically found in agreements with distributors, broadcasters, financiers, and completion bonders. Such approvals do not interfere with producer control.

Determining Producer Control

The CRTC uses four indicators to determine producer control:

  1. Development: The producer must demonstrate full responsibility for the development of the project from the date the producer secures the underlying rights. If development has been materially completed by or with the involvement of non-Canadians, the producer must establish that these activities did not interfere with the producer’s responsibilities and control. If necessary, the CRTC will review the chain-of-title documentation to confirm that the producer is responsible for the development of the project.

    Any ongoing involvement of prior rights-owners in development, production or exploitation of the project subsequent to the producer securing the underlying rights is presumed to indicate that this party retains a degree of responsibility and control.

  2. Creative and Financial Control: Documentation must demonstrate that, with the exception of standard approval rights from broadcasters, distributors, financiers and completion-bonders, the producer has exercised full control and holds final decision-making authority over creative and financial aspects of the production, including:

    • The project budget.
    • The production schedule.
    • Selecting and hiring above- and below-the-line cast and production personnel and the negotiation of the terms thereof.
    • Selecting and contracting production services (camera package, sound package, post-production facilities, and the negotiation of agreements with unions and guilds, and post-production elements).
  3. Financing: Documentation must demonstrate that the producer has exercised full control and holds final decision-making authority over:

    • The financing plan.
    • Securing all third-party financing, including, without limitation, domestic and foreign equity, domestic and foreign subsidies, domestic and foreign pre-sales and the negotiation of the terms thereof.
    • Securing interim financing (i.e. production financing) and negotiating the terms thereof.
    • The cash-flow schedule of the project.
    • Managing banking for the project and maintaining sole and unfettered control over the bank account(s) of the project and cheque-signing authority.

    Note: International co-ventures are subject to specific requirements with regard to financing.

  4. Producer Remuneration: The Canadian producer’s remuneration (in the aggregate) must exceed the total aggregate remuneration paid to all foreign producer-related positions.

    Where contractual conditions related to areas outlined above limit the Canadian producer, the production will be considered ineligible for certification. We make determinations on a case-by case-basis, giving due regard to all contractual obligations, facts and representations.

Production Costs

In order to encourage the use and development of Canadian creative talent, at least of 75% of the production’s services costs must be paid to Canadians and at least 75% of the production’s post-production and laboratory costs must be paid for services provided in Canada by Canadians or Canadian companies.

Applicants must provide a completed Breakdown of Costs form for any productions that include non-Canadian costs.

Services Costs

Services costs include all costs that are incurred for services provided in respect of the making of the production:

  • Development
  • Story
  • Stock footage and music rights
  • Non-key creative personnel
  • All producer positions (other than producer and co-producer)
  • Production staff
  • All production labour
  • All rentals
  • Transportation
  • Shipping
  • Customs and communications
  • Animals
  • Video studio facilities
  • Video remote technical facilities
  • Second unit crew
  • Completion guarantee
  • Unit publicity
  • Amortization (in the case of a series)

A services cost is deemed Canadian or non-Canadian based on the citizenship* of the person whose account incurred the cost or the person providing the service.

Example: If costs are incurred for a Canadian citizen or permanent resident travelling on production-related business to a location, whether inside or outside Canada, all of the costs incurred for this person's travel, including food and lodging while traveling and on-location, would be considered Canadian costs since they were incurred for a Canadian citizen or permanent resident. If these same costs were incurred for a non-Canadian, even if they were incurred in Canada, they would be considered non-Canadian expenditures.

In the case of services provided by an incorporated company, the company must have a Canadian business in Canada, a Canadian address, and be owned and controlled by a Canadian in order for the cost to be considered Canadian.

*Or date of landing for permanent residents who are not Canadian citizens

Post-Production and Laboratory Costs

Post-production and laboratory costs include costs for:

  • Videotape stock and production laboratory (other than purchases)
  • Voice edit labour and other editorial labour
  • Editorial equipment rentals
  • Post-production picture and sound labour
  • Special effects
  • Computer graphics
  • Music labour and other music expenses
  • Titles/optical
  • Versioning
  • Amortization (in the case of a series)

In order for a post-production or laboratory cost to be considered Canadian, it must have been incurred for post-production or laboratory services provided in Canada by Canadians or by a Canadian company. All services provided by non-Canadians, including services provided by Canadians outside Canada, are considered non-Canadian.

A Canadian company for the purpose of post-production and laboratory costs is a company incorporated and carrying on business in Canada, with a Canadian business address, owned and controlled by Canadians.

Excluded Costs

To allow Canadian producers greater flexibility, the following costs are excluded from both service and post-production/laboratory costs:

  • Remuneration (including fringe benefits) for producer, co-producer, director, screenwriter/scriptwriter, production designer, DOP/chief camera operator, picture editor, first lead performer, second lead performer, music composer, storyboard supervisor and design supervisor.
  • Purchased goods and all non-related production expenses (including accounting, legal fees, bank charges, insurance, auditing, corporate overhead, interim financing, interest and contingency).

Program Categories

Program categories are defined in Broadcasting Regulatory Policy 2010-808.

We assign all certified productions a program category. To determine the program category, we review the production synopsis you submit as part of your application. As the applicant, you are responsible for clearly explaining in this synopsis how the production meets the program category you are requesting, including a detailed description of the program type, format and the theme or subject matter.

In addition to the synopsis, we may request a link, DVD, or USB, that allows us to review the finished production.

In the case of a series, you must submit two episodes that will be broadcast as a part of the season for which you are seeking certification.

Note that applicants seeking program category 2a (Analysis and Interpretation), 2b (Long-form documentary) or 5b (Informal education/Recreation & Leisure) must always provide a link, DVD, or USB with their application.

FAQ

General certification questions

What’s the difference between CRTC certification and CAVCO certification?

The CRTC is responsible for certifying domestic television and film productions, as well as dubbed versions of Canadian and foreign programs. The CRTC also certifies independently produced co-ventures (international co-productions that are not included under the treaties administered by Telefilm Canada).

CRTC-authorized television broadcasters must finance and exhibit a certain percentage of content made by Canadians, and also must meet Canadian programming expenditure requirements. To monitor compliance, the CRTC requires these licensees to maintain and submit program logs and other documentation for the Canadian programming they broadcast, and these productions are identified using a CRTC or CAVCO certification number.

CAVCO is part of the Department of Canadian Heritage and is responsible for the certification of domestic productions and international treaty co-productions applying for the Canadian film or video production tax credit (CPTC).

If a production is certified by CAVCO, does it need to be certified by the CRTC?

A production that has been certified by CAVCO is recognized as Canadian by the CRTC; however, an application to the CRTC is required in order for a program to be eligible for the 150% Dramatic Time Credit or the 33% supplementary time credit for dubbings of Canadian programs.

Is there an application fee for certification?

No.

When can I apply for certification?

You can only apply for certification once the principal photography (filming) has begun, all key creative personnel are under contract, and the budget is in place. Because live broadcasts are produced and broadcast simultaneously, the usual requirement that principal photography has started doesn’t apply to these productions.

Is there a deadline to apply for certification?

No. You may apply as long as the criteria in FAQ #4 are met.

Do I need to submit separate applications for different durations or different language versions of my production?

No. The application form allows you to include different durations and different language versions of a production. In such cases, we will issue separate certification numbers for each duration and language version. If the difference in duration is under ten minutes, however, we’ll issue the same certification number as for the original version.

However if you produce a version with a different duration or language after we’ve certified the original production, you will need to apply for a certification number for that new duration or language version.

Do I need to submit separate applications for each season of a series?

Yes. You need to apply for a certification number for each season of a series.

My production is a domestic co-production. Who submits the application form?

Where there is more than one Canadian company producing a production, only one application for certification should be submitted by the company designated by the co-producers as the primary applicant. We will only issue one certification letter, which will go to the primary applicant.

Do I need to provide a web link for my production?

Applicants seeking a program category 2a (Analysis and Interpretation), 2b (Long-form documentary) or 5b (Informal education/Recreation & Leisure) must always provide a link, DVD, or USB with their application. For a series, you must submit at least two episodes.

If the production it not finished at the time of submission, we will request it at the time of analysis.

For all other categories, we may request a copy of the production as part of our analysis of your application to determine the program category, verify whether there is any advertising material, review the start and end credits, and ensure that what appears on-screen accords with the information in the application form.

My production did not incur any non-Canadian costs. Do I need to submit a breakdown of costs form (BOC)?

No. A breakdown of costs form is only required for productions that incur non-Canadian costs.

How do I complete a breakdown of costs (BOC) form?

You can find guides for completing BOC forms for both live action and animated production on the Canadian Program Certification application forms site.

How long will it take to process my application?

We process applications in the order in which we receive them. In addition to the general volume of applications we’re processing, the processing time is also affected by the complexity of your application, the clarity of the information you provide, and whether we need further information. We generally process applications within 12 weeks of receipt, but this may vary.

If your application is returned due to a lack of information and then re-filed, this will further delay the processing of your application.

How can I find out the status of my application?

To inquire about the status of your application, please call 819-997-4699 or email the Canadian Program Certification Group.

Why was my application returned?

We return applications when they are incomplete, are missing supporting documents, or when we do not receive requested additional information.

Where can I find a list of productions certified by the CRTC?

Please refer to our list of Canadian programs certified by the CRTC.

Questions regarding eligibility

Does the CRTC provide advance rulings or preliminary certifications?

No.

Do I need to have an agreement with a Canadian broadcaster or distributor to be eligible for certification?

No.

My production will only be shown online. Can it still be certified?

Yes, we will certify productions regardless of what platform on which they are shown.

Can I film my production abroad and still receive Canadian program certification?

Yes, provided that the production meets the 75/25% Canadian spending requirements for services and post-production costs.

How many key creative points must a production score for CRTC certification?

Please refer to the Points Awarded Per Key Creative Position.

To summarize, in order to be certified as Canadian, all domestic productions and international co-ventures must:

  • Achieve a minimum of 6 out of 10 key creative points.
  • Have a Canadian as at least one of the director or screenwriter/scriptwriter and storyboard supervisor positions.
  • Have a Canadian as at least one of the two lead performers/voices.

We allow an exception for productions that score less than a minimum of 6 points (such as documentaries), as long as all key creative positions are filled by Canadians.

Some other exceptions apply.

Why did my production receive fewer key creative points than I expected?

We will not award a point for productions that feature existing music and do not hire a music composer to create original music specifically for the production. Accordingly, a production that does not include a music composer, but where all available key creative positions are filled by Canadians, would receive a score of 9/10.

Why did my production not receive certification for the program category indicated in my application?

We assign a program category based on a thorough review of the finished production.

Can a non-Canadian fill the role of the producer, co-producer, line producer, or production manager?

For domestic productions, in no circumstances can non-Canadians receive a producer, co-producer, line producer, or production manager credit. These requirements do not apply to international co-ventures.

Can a non-Canadian receive a courtesy credit?

Non-Canadians can receive a courtesy credit provided they complete an affidavit and their duties in no way interfere with administrative, creative or financial decisions of the Canadian producer.

The CRTC will not allow any non-Canadian to receive a courtesy credit if they are also credited as a writer for the production.

When do I need to provide proof of Canadian citizenship (or Canadian permanent residency status) for my key creative personnel?

We require proof of citizenship or permanent residency for all producers, producer personnel, and key creative personnel for Drama productions (program categories 7a to 7g), which may be eligible to obtain a 150% time credit. We may also require proof of citizenship or permanent residency for any and all other applications.

Proof of citizenship is required by all individuals fulfilling the following roles:

  • Producer and all producer-related personnel.
  • Key creative personnel: Director, Writer, Production Designer, DOP or Chief Camera Operator, Music Composer, and Picture Editor, Storyboard Supervisor and Design Supervisor.
  • First and second lead performers.

Proof of citizenship may be any one of the following:

What types of programming do not require CRTC certification?

CRTC certification is not required for:

  • Programs produced in-house solely by a CRTC licensed or exempt broadcaster.
  • Federal and provincial government productions.
  • Public service announcements, interstitials, and any other productions of less than 5 minutes in duration.

What types of programming are ineligible for CRTC certification?

The CRTC will not certify infomercials, promotional and corporate videos, or other forms of advertising material.

Repackaged or adapted versions of existing foreign productions or program segments and productions made up predominantly of existing footage produced by a foreign producer, even if assembled or edited in Canada, with Canadian narration, are also ineligible for certification.

How does the CRTC define advertising?

Please refer to Is advertising content eligible to be certified as ‘Canadian’?

What is the difference between a documentary and a reality program?

The distinction between documentary and reality programs is defined in Broadcasting Regulatory Policy CRTC 2010-808.

Technical questions:

What is GCKey?

GCKey is a Canadian government-wide application that allows individuals to securely submit documents to a variety of departments. Applicants for Canadian program certification must use this tool to submit their applications and documents, including confidential information online, through their My CRTC Account.

How do I sign-up for a GCKey?

Signing up for a GCKey gives you a unique electronic credential. The link to the GCKey website is available on the certification applications webpage.

Do I need an activation code?

You need an activation code the first time you sign up for your My CRTC Account with GCKey. To get an activation code, call the CRTC at 1-866-893-0932.

Once you have this code, you can sign up for your My CRTC Account with GCKey and submit your application form online.

I already have a Government of Canada GCKey.

If you already have a Government of Canada GCKey with the CRTC, you do not need to re-register or get an activation code. Simply log in using your username and password.

Can I go back to an application and revise information?

No. Once an application has been submitted, you can no longer access the application.

To verify the status of your application or to amend information in the application, please contact the certification group by telephone at 819-997-4699 or send an email to the Canadian Program Certification group.

The SmartForm is not working (i.e. technical difficulties); who do I call?

If you are experiencing technical problems, please contact the certification group at

819-997-4699.

I no longer have my GCKey registration information (username, password) because I have lost, forgotten, or misplaced it. Is there any way that I can recover the information?

You cannot recover a lost username. To re-register for a GCKey account or call GCKey

1-866-372-7742.

If you have forgotten or misplaced your password, you can create a new password. At the GCKey log in page, select Forget Your Password? and follow the steps to create your new password.

Does my GCKey expire?

Yes, your GCKey can expire. The system requires you to use your GCKey at least once every 24 months. If you do not use your GCKey within that timeframe, it will expire. If your GCKey expires, you will have to register for a new account.

Can I use someone else’s GCKey account?

No. You must sign up for your own My CRTC GCKey account because it is a unique credential assigned to an individual.

I have received a message indicating that my session has expired.

If you do not perform any activity for more than 20 minutes, your session will automatically close. Please ensure that you save your information periodically and save the application before closing. You will receive notification if your session is about to expire.

All other questions:

Where can I get more information about Canadian Program Certification?

For all other questions regarding Canadian program certification, please call our main line at

819-997-4699 or e-mail the Canadian Program Certification group.

Glossary

Animation (Traditional)

The process of filming or recording: a series of poses of figures, objects or shapes; drawings, each slightly displaced from the preceding pose; or drawing created in sequence on successive frames of recording material, one or more frames at a time. When the film is projected or the recording is played, the rapid projection of the multiple images gives the illusion of movement.

Animation (Computer)

Computer-assisted animation revises existing animated material using computer technology. Computer-generated animation uses computer technology to synthesize digital images in order to generate animated movement.

Canadian (Individual)

A person who is, at all relevant times, a Canadian citizen as defined in the Citizenship Act or a permanent resident as defined in the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act who has received a Permanent Residence Certificate.

“At all relevant times” means that an individual must be Canadian at the time they begin their duties in relation to the production and during the entire course of the filming or taping and post-production. An individual cannot acquire permanent resident status in order to qualify as Canadian at any point during a production; such status must be confirmed before the individual begins engaging in any activity related to the production. An individual acquiring permanent resident status after he or she begins engaging in any activity related to the production will be considered a non-Canadian for the entire production. Likewise, a corporation must be a Canadian-controlled corporation during the same time period.

It is important that applicants confirm the status of each person who will occupy a key creative position before the person begins engaging in any activity related to the production.

Canadian (Production Company)

A Canadian company carrying on business in Canada, with a Canadian business address, that is owned and controlled by Canadians.

Certification letter

Once a production is certified, applicants will receive a letter outlining the details of the certification, including the title of the production, the certification number, the points awarded (if applicable), the program category, and the time credit. The letter also contains other important information on the certification, such as any conditions on which the certification was granted.

Certification number

Refers to the unique number assigned to a certified production that Canadian broadcasters must include in their programming logs. There are three types of numbers: a “C” number for a domestic Canadian production or the dubbing of a Canadian production, an “SR” number (special recognition) for an international co-venture, or a “D” number for the dubbing of a foreign production.

Co-production (Domestic)

A Canadian production produced by more than one Canadian company.

Co-production (International Treaty)

An audiovisual work produced jointly by a Canadian producer and a producer from a foreign country with which Canada has a co-production treaty administered by Telefilm Canada. The production must be produced in accordance with the terms and conditions of the treaty.

Co-venture

International co-productions that aren’t included under the treaties administered by Telefilm Canada. These include all ventures with co-producers of foreign countries that either do not have a film or television production treaty with Canada or, if there is a treaty, the co-production is not specifically covered by the treaty.

Continuous action animation

The process of filming real figures, shapes or objects as they are manipulated using mechanical or other devices. When the film or recording is played, the rapid projection of the multiple images gives the illusion of movement. Examples of continuous action animation include puppets controlled by a puppeteer and filmed continuously in real time and pixilation animation using live action shots of real people in real locations, manipulated to achieve the effect of having actors jump, jerk or twitch as if they were being animated.

Existing music (pre-recorded music)

Music or other sounds not specifically created for the production in question. This includes stock, archival or library music.

Existing (non-original) footage

Footage not specifically created for the production in question. This includes stock, library or archival footage. For Canadian certification, foreign-produced stock footage must be limited to less than 50% of the running time of all programs except for documentaries.

Existing segments from an original program

Original segments or versions of previously produced programs not specifically created for the production in question.

Key creative personnel

Persons filling the “key” creative functions involved in the making of the production for which points are awarded when they are performed by Canadians.

Live action

Programs involving real people or animals as actors, host, subjects, narrators, etc., as opposed to animations.

Music video clip

Short films, videotape productions or concert excerpts (clips) not produced primarily for the program in which they are presented, and which normally contain one musical selection with visual material.

Music video program

A program consisting predominantly (i.e. more than 50%) of music video clips and, in some cases, including a host and other programming elements.

One-off

A television program that is a stand-alone, single production, other than a pilot, that is not part of a series or any other type of production.

Pilot episode

A production that is produced as a forerunner to a television series. It is produced to secure the interest and eventual financing of broadcasters and other participants for the production of a series or anthology.

Post-production

The set of activities that follows the shooting of a film or television program including editing, special effects, mixing of soundtracks and dubbing.

Principal photography

The phase during which the production is actually filmed, distinct from pre-production and post-production. Principal photography begins with the first day of filming the production or, in the case of a series, the first episode. For an animation, it is the beginning of key animation.

Producer-related personnel

Any person working in a production capacity other than the producer, co-producer, line producer, or production manager.

Series

A program with two or more episodes produced by the same production company or producer. The program must have a title, theme, and situation or set of characters common to each episode. Each episode must have the same duration.

Reference (Relevant Circulars and Public Notices)

Policies related to program certification

Policies related to broadcasting

Regulations related to broadcasting

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