CRTC Exhibit 1 – Review of basic telecommunications services, Telecom Notice of Consultation CRTC 2015-134

Popular Internet applications – Bandwidth requirements

This chart is an illustration attempting to show the amount of bandwidth required for various online applications and services, in order to illustrate the sorts of services that consumers may expect to receive depending on the Internet access service that they use as well as the capabilities of several broadband technologies. The X-axis is the Average Available Bandwidth in Mbps, and there are 6 labels along the axis; Dial-up, 128 kbps, 500 kbps, 1.5 Mbps, 5 Mbps, 15 Mbps, and greater than 15 Mbps. The Y-axis is Required Performance Consistency, and has 3 labels; Files, Streaming, and Real-Time. Within the body of the chart are various ovals illustrating the type of services and the bandwidth they require. In the “Files” category are the following: E-mail from dial-up to 128 kbps; Small Software Download from 128 kbps to 500 kbps; Music Downloads from 500 kbps to under 1.5 Mbps; Software Download (1 CD) from 1.5 Mbps to 5 Mbps; DVD Size Video Download from 5 Mbps to 15 Mbps; Blu-ray Size Video Download above 15 Mbps. Between the “Files” and “Streaming” categories is Web Surfing, which ranges from Dial-up to 1.5 Mbps. In the “Streaming” category are the following: Radio from dial-up to 140 kbps; Audio streaming from 140 kbps to 400 kbps; SD video streaming from 300 kbps to under 1.5 Mbps; HD Video Streaming from 3 Mbps to 15 Mbps. In the “Real-Time” category are the following: VoIP from dial-up to under 128 kbps; Real-Time Gaming from 70 kbps to 500 kbps; Video Conferencing from under 500 kbps to 5 Mbps.  Mobile 2.5G is capable of speeds up to 128 kbps, but cannot do more than file type performance consistency and low end web surfing.  Mobile 3G is capable of up to 500 kbps, is able to do VoIP, but its capability diminishes for other real time applications, and is limited to low end real-time gaming.  Mobile HSPA+ and wireline broadband less than 5 Mbps can do low end HD video streaming and SD IPTV, and many forms of video conferencing. Mobile 4G/LTE and faster wireline broadband services can handle all other applications.

Source: CRTC Technology Resource Centre

Long Description

This chart is an illustration attempting to show the amount of bandwidth required for various online applications and services, in order to illustrate the sorts of services that consumers may expect to receive depending on the Internet access service that they use as well as the capabilities of several broadband technologies.

The X-axis is the Average Available Bandwidth in Mbps, and there are 6 labels along the axis; Dial-up, 128 kbps, 500 kbps, 1.5 Mbps, 5 Mbps, 15 Mbps, and greater than 15 Mbps.

The Y-axis is Required Performance Consistency, and has 3 labels; Files, Streaming, and Real-Time. Within the body of the chart are various ovals illustrating the type of services and the bandwidth they require.

In the “Files” category are the following: E-mail from dial-up to 128 kbps; Small Software Download from 128 kbps to 500 kbps; Music Downloads from 500 kbps to under 1.5 Mbps; Software Download (1 CD) from 1.5 Mbps to 5 Mbps; DVD Size Video Download from 5 Mbps to 15 Mbps; Blu-ray Size Video Download above 15 Mbps.

Between the “Files” and “Streaming” categories is Web Surfing, which ranges from Dial-up to 1.5 Mbps.

In the “Streaming” category are the following: Radio from dial-up to 140 kbps; Audio streaming from 140 kbps to 400 kbps; SD video streaming from 300 kbps to under 1.5 Mbps; HD Video Streaming from 3 Mbps to 15 Mbps.

In the “Real-Time” category are the following: VoIP from dial-up to under 128 kbps; Real-Time Gaming from 70 kbps to 500 kbps; Video Conferencing from under 500 kbps to 5 Mbps.

Mobile 2.5G is capable of speeds up to 128 kbps, but cannot do more than file type performance consistency and low end web surfing.

Mobile 3G is capable of up to 500 kbps, is able to do VoIP, but its capability diminishes for other real time applications, and is limited to low end real-time gaming. Mobile HSPA+ and wireline broadband less than 5 Mbps can do low end HD video streaming and SD IPTV, and many forms of video conferencing.

Mobile 4G/LTE and faster wireline broadband services can handle all other applications.

3G refers to third-generation wireless technology
SD refers to standard definition
HD refers to high definition

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