CRTC launches Let’s Talk TV: A Conversation with Canadians

OTTAWA-GATINEAU, October 24, 2013 — The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) today launched Let’s Talk TV: A Conversation with Canadians, a discussion about the future of Canada’s television system.

“Canadians have an unprecedented choice of television programs that includes the best of what Canada, and the world, has to offer,” said Jean-Pierre Blais, Chairman of the CRTC. “Many still enjoy network-scheduled programming on their TV sets, but the viewing habits of many others are changing. Let’s Talk TV: A Conversation with Canadians is an opportunity for all Canadians to tell us what they think of their television system and how they would like to see it changed.”

The CRTC invites Canadians to share their views on three questions:

The CRTC wants Canadians to share their ideas about the future of Canada’s television system and is providing Canadians with a number of ways to join the conversation.

Starting today, Canadians can:

Canadians are encouraged to submit their comments by November 22, 2013.

For the first time, the CRTC is also giving Canadians the opportunity to host “Flash!” conferences – volunteer-hosted events at which participants are invited to discuss and explore the conversation’s themes. “Flash!” conferences may be held at any time, and organizers are invited to submit reports of their discussions to the CRTC no later than January 10, 2014. The CRTC has prepared a kit to facilitate these conferences.

“Let’s Talk TV: A Conversation with Canadians puts Canadians right where they belong: at the centre of their television system,” said Mr. Blais. “We want to ensure that Canada’s TV system speaks to the current and future needs of Canadians as engaged citizens, as consumers that make informed choices about programming, and as creators of exceptional content.”

The CRTC wants to hear from as many Canadians as possible, and the broadcasting industry can play a role in making them aware of Let’s Talk TV: A Conversation with Canadians.

“We hope that broadcasters and television distributors will help us bring Canadians into the conversation,” said Mr. Blais. “For example, television channels could air public service announcements, local television stations could host panel discussions, and cable companies could use their community channels to engage viewers. The comments we receive from Canadians will help set the stage for the formal public proceeding that will get underway next year.”

The CRTC’s formal review of the television system will draw on the issues and priorities identified by Canadians. The review will be launched in spring 2014, and include a public hearing in September 2014.

The CRTC

The CRTC is an administrative tribunal that regulates and supervises broadcasting and telecommunications in Canada.

Resources

Broadcasting Notice of Invitation CRTC 2013-563

Video

Let's Talk TV: A Conversation with Canadians

Let's Talk TV: A Conversation with Canadians

Transcript

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Let’s Talk TV - A conversation with Canadians

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