Departmental Performance Report 2015-2016 - Supplementary Information Tables

Supplementary Information

Sub-Program 1.1.1: Diverse Canadian Content

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
  2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2015–16
Total Authorities Available for Use
2015–16
Actual Spending
2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
Gross Expenditures 7,891,096 7,891,096 8,166,776 7,278,615 -612,481
Respendable Revenue 6,869,048 6,869,048 6,870,123 6,716,053 -152,995
Net Expenditures 1,022,048 1,022,048 1,296,653 562,562 -459,486
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2015–16
Planned
2015–16
Actual
2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
57 57 -
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Resultsnote de bas de page 1
Diverse Canadian programming is created and broadcast Percentage of examined undertakings compliant with regulatory requirements regarding broadcast of Canadian programming 90% 92%
Percentage of examined undertakings compliant with regulatory requirements to spend and/or contribute to funds or initiatives supporting Canadian content creation 90% 95%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

92% of radio and television undertakings examined (245 of 266) were compliant with the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission’s (CRTC) broadcasting requirements for diversity in Canadian programming, exceeding the 90% target. As well, 95% (103 of 108) of these undertakings were compliant with the CRTC’s spending and/or contribution requirements to support Canadian content creation, exceeding the 90% target. These results demonstrate the CRTC’s continued support for the creation of diverse Canadian programming that provides a balance of information and entertainment; access to local, regional and national information services; and availability in both official languages and in third languages.

Sub-Program 1.1.2: Compelling Canadian Content

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
  2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2015–16
Total Authorities Available for Use
2015–16
Actual Spending
2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
Gross Expenditures 8,128,253 8,128,253 8,410,451 7,575,701 -552,552
Respendable Revenue 7,075,489 7,075,489 7,075,109 6,990,178 -85,311
Net Expenditures 1,052,764 1,052,764 1,335,342 585,523 -467,241
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16
Planned
2015–16
Actual
2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
62 61 -1
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Resultsnote de bas de page 2
Compelling Canadian programming is created Percentage of total television viewing is to Canadian programming 48% 49%
Average percentage of radio listening is to Canadian content 50% 54%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Of television watched in Canada during the 2014–15 broadcast year, 49% was Canadian programming, as measured by Numeris. This result is above the target of 48%. Of radio listening in Canada, 54% was to Canadian content, above the 50% target. These results demonstrate that compelling Canadian content is being created and broadcast.

Sub-Program 1.2.1: Quality Communication Services

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
  2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2015–16
Total Authorities Available for Use
2015–16
Actual Spending
2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
Gross Expenditures 10,059,957 10,059,957 10,412,875 9,965,603 -94,354
Respendable Revenue 8,776,328 8,776,328 8,778,085 8,797,531 21,203
Net Expenditures 1,283,629 1,283,629 1,634,790 1,168,072 -115,557
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16
Planned
2015–16
Actual
2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
73 73 -
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Quality and accessible communication services Percentage of households that have access to broadband speeds of at least 5 megabits per second (Mbps) downstream and 1 Mbps upstream 100% 99.5%note de bas de page 3
Percentage of retail quality of service indicators met by local telephone companies 95% 96%note de bas de page 4
Percentage of examined undertakings in compliance with regulatory requirements regarding accessibility 100% 100%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2011, the CRTC set a target that 100% of households would have access to broadband Internet speeds of at least 5 Mbps downstream and 1 Mbps upstream by December 31, 2015. The CRTC announced in February 2016 that large telephone companies had completed the rollout of broadband services to more than 280 rural and remote communities based on plans approved by the CRTC. As of December 31, 2015, 99.5% of Canadian households had access to these speeds, compared to 91% in 2013 and 96% as of December 2014. The households that do not have access to these speeds are generally in rural and remote areas. The issue of the availability of broadband services is being considered in the CRTC’s review of basic telecommunications services.

The CRTC’s retail quality of service regime was established to ensure a minimum standard of service that telephone companies provide to their subscribers. Of retail quality of service indicators, 96% were met by local telephone companies, compared to the target of 95% and the result of 91% in 2014. Overall indicators for all companies were up slightly.

Based on information available to the CRTC, 100% of examined undertakings appear to be compliant with current accessibility requirements. The CRTC continued to monitor the broadcasting and telecommunications industries’ progress toward increasing the accessibility of the communication system for all Canadians.

Sub-Program 1.2.2: Affordable Communication Services

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
  2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2015–16
Total Authorities Available for Use
2015–16
Actual Spending
2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
Gross Expenditures 8,938,673 8,938,673 9,249,143 8,489,218 -449,455
Respendable Revenue 7,798,118 7,798,118 7,797,056 7,494,193 -303,925
Net Expenditures 1,140,555 1,140,555 1,452,087 995,025 -145,530
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16
Planned
2015–16
Actual
2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
65 66 +1
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Consumers have communication service choices Percentage of households that have access to three or more service providers for broadband Internet service 95% 98%note de bas de page 5
Percentage of households that have access to three or more broadcasting distribution undertakings 95% 93%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

As of December 31, 2015, 98% of Canadians had access to three or more service providers offering broadband Internet service (i.e. 1.5 Mbps download or higher), compared to the CRTC’s target of 95% and its result of 98% as of December 2014.95% of Canadians also had access to three or more service providers offering broadband Internet service at 5 Mbps or higher, compared to 90% in December 2014. Subscribers living in rural communities continue to have fewer Internet service providers to choose from than those living in urban communities. Similarly, as of August 31, 2015, 93% of Canadians had access to three or more broadcasting distribution undertakings, compared to 92% in 2014 and the target of 95%. Canadians living in urban centers had access to three types of service providers: cable, direct-to-home satellite, and Internet Protocol television (IPTV), while Canadians living in rural areas generally had a choice between direct-to-home satellite and, to a lesser extent, cable service providers.

Sub-Program 1.3.1: Safety-Enhancing Communication Services

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
  2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2015–16
Total Authorities Available for Use
2015–16
Actual Spending
2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
Gross Expenditures 2,213,150 2,213,150 2,288,578 2,493,034 279,884
Respendable Revenue 1,161,790 1,161,790 1,159,930 1,357,710 195,920
Net Expenditures 1,051,360 1,051,360 1,128,648 1,135,324 83,964
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16
Planned
2015–16
Actual
2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
16 15 -1
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Communication service providers offer safety-enhancing services Percentage of broadcasters participating in public alerting system 80% 85%
Percentage of facilities-based telecommunications service providers in compliance with 9-1-1 requirements 100% 99%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

85% of broadcasters were compliant with regulations implemented in August 2014 requiring the broadcasting industry’s full participation in a national emergency alerting system by March 31, 2015. Campus and community broadcasters were given until March 31, 2016 to be in compliance.

The Commission continues to make advancements with respect to its 9-1-1 Action Plan, published in 2014. As of March 31, 2016, facilities-based telecommunications service providers’ compliance with 9-1-1 requirements was at 99%, compared to the target of 100%. A very small number of service providers had not completed required updates to their websites by the end of the fiscal year. The Commission expects to achieve the 100% target early in the new fiscal year. In July 2015, the CRTC launched a proceeding in which it examined the reliability and resiliency of 9-1-1 networks.

Sub-Program 1.3.2: Unsolicited Commercial Communications

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
  2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2015–16
Total Authorities Available for Use
2015–16
Actual Spending
2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
Gross Expenditures 8,894,918 8,894,918 9,217,098 7,894,607 -1,000,311
Respendable Revenue 4,669,376 4,669,376 4,671,540 4,299,417 -369,959
Net Expenditures 4,225,542 4,225,542 4,545,558 3,595,190 -630,352
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16
Planned
2015–16
Actual
2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
63 65 +2
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Unsolicited commercial communications violations are reduced Percentage of unsolicited commercial messages (spam) reduced within 12 month period -10% Available next reporting period
Percentage of organizations that remain compliant within 12 months after compliance/enforcement action taken 80% 100%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

At the end of 2014–15, nine months after Canada's Anti-Spam Legislation (CASL) came into force, the CRTC Spam Reporting Centre had received over 265,000 submissions. In 2015–16, the CRTC received an additional 291,000 submissions. While this shows an increase of 8.9% from 2014–15, the 2014–15 data does not establish a valid baseline given that the reporting period was fewer than 12 months. The 2015–16 reporting period will be used as a baseline for the next reporting on CASL.

Of organizations found in violation of the Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules (UTRs) regulations, 100% remained compliant in the 12 months after a compliance or enforcement action was taken.

Reporting on the User Fees Act

Fee name Fees for the processing requests filed under the Access to Information Act
Fee type Other products and services
Fee-setting authority Access to Information Act
Year introduced 1988
Year last amended 1992
Performance standard A response is provided within 30 days following the receipt of a request; response time may be extended under section 9 of the Access to Information Act.
Performance results During FY 2015-16, 66 new requests were received and 6 were carried over from FY 2014-15 for a total of 72 requests. Of this total, 51 requests were completed in the following timeframe: 26 requests or 51% were completed within 30 days, 8 requests or 16% within 31 to 60 days, 9 requests or 17% within 61 to 120 days, 4 requests or 8% within 121 to 180 days, 4 requests or 8% within 181 and 365 days. 21 requests are still pending at the end of FY 2015-16.Note: Notice of Extension is sent to the requester within 30 days of receipt of the request.
Other information Under the Access to Information Act, fees under $25.00 may be waived when deemed to be in the public interest. Fees waived during the FY 2015-16 were $15.
Financial Information, 2015-16 (dollars)
Forecasted Revenue Actual revenue Full cost
1,000 430 374,268
Financial Information, 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2016-17 1,000 300,000
2017-18 1,000 300,000
2018-19 1,000 300,000

Reporting on the Policy on Service Standards for External Fees

General Information by Fee

External fee name Broadcasting Licence Fees - Part I
Service standard

Part I Broadcasting applications: decision to be issued within 4 months of close of records (CoR).

Broadcasting applications considered at Public Hearing: decision to be issued within 4 months of CoR.

Broadcasting applications – administrative route: decision to be rendered within 1 month of date of receipt.

Ownership-related applications: decision to be rendered within the timeframes set out below:

  1. Hearing route within 35 days of CoR
  2. Notice of consultation route: within 2 months of CoR
  3. Administrative route: within 2 months after the date of receipt
Performance results

Part I Broadcasting applications: 155 applications received, 82% of decisions issued within 4 months of CoR.

Broadcasting applications considered at Public Hearing : 48 applications received, 85% of decisions issued within 4 months of CoR.

Broadcasting applications – administrative route: 165 applications received, 91% of decisions rendered within 1 month of date of receipt.

Ownership-related applications

  1. Hearing route 19 applications received, 100% decisions rendered within timeframe
  2. Notice of consultation route: 2 application received, 50% decision rendered within timeframe
  3. Administrative route: 11 applications received, 82% decision rendered within timeframe
Stakeholder consultation Broadcasting Licence Fee Regulations,1997- Broadcasting Regulatory Policy 2010-476 dated 14 July 2010
Other information 2015-16 Fees- Broadcasting Order CRTC 2015-101 dated 25 March 2015
External fee name Broadcasting Licence Fees – Part II
Service standard Not applicable. There are no service standards for the Part II licence fees as these fees recover part of the Government of Canada's substantial annual investment in the Canadian broadcasting system. These are non-respendable revenue and are fully remitted to the Consolidated Revenue Fund. These fees are characterized as Rights & Privileges/Regulatory Charges.
Performance results Not applicable
Stakeholder consultation Broadcasting Licence Fee Regulations,1997- Broadcasting Regulatory Policy 2010-476 dated 14 July 2010
Other information 2015-16 Fees: Broadcasting Order CRTC 2015-485 dated 29 October 2015
External fee name Telecommunications Fees
Service standard

Part I Applications: decision to be issued within 4 months of the close of records (CoR).

Part 1 Applications – Local Forbearance: decision to be issued within 120 days of receiving complete application.

Tariff Applications and Intercarrier Agreements

The Services standards set as follows:

  1. 85% of determinations are to be made on an interim or final basis within 2 month of receipt of complete application
  2. 95% of determinations are to be made on an interim or final basis within 4 months of receipt of complete application
Destandardization and/or Withdrawal Applications: to issue 95% of determinations on a final basis within 12 months
Performance results

Part I Applications: 44 applications received, 61% of decisions issued within 4 months of CoR

Part 1 Applications – Local Forbearance : 3 applications received, 100% decisions issued within 120 days

Tariff Applications and Intercarrier Agreements:

  1. 460 applications received, 97% completed within 2 months
  2. 460 applications received, 99% completed within 4 monthsDestandardization and/or Withdrawal Applications: 22 applications received, 100% completed within 12 months
Stakeholder consultation Telecommunications Fee Regulations, 2010-Telecom Decision CRTC 2010-183 dated 25 March 2010
Other information 2015-16 Fees- Telecom Order CRTC 2015-209 dated 21 May 2015
External fee name Unsolicited Telecommunications Fees
Service standard Not applicable
Performance results Not applicable
Stakeholder consultation Unsolicited Telecommunications Fees Regulations – Compliance and Enforcement Decision CRTC 2013-26
Other information Compliance and Enforcement Order CRTC 2016-187 dated 17 May 2016

Explanation of Revenue

The CRTC collects fees under the authority of regulations under the Broadcasting Act and Telecommunications Act. For the fiscal year 2015-2016:

Broadcasting Licence Fees

Section 11 of the Broadcasting Act gives the Commission the authority to make regulations with respect to licence fees. These regulations apply to most licensees, who are required to pay annually their Part I and Part II licence fees to the Commission. The last amendment to the Broadcasting Licence Fee Regulations was done in 2010. Details on the amendment can be found in Broadcasting Regulatory Policy CRTC 2010-476 on the CRTC website. The Broadcasting Licence Fee Regulations can be found on the Department of Justice website.

Part I Licence Fees

For 2015–2016, the CRTC assessed $30 million in Part I licence fees, including "true-up" and adjustments (Broadcasting Order CRTC 2015-101)
Part I licence fees are based on the broadcasting regulatory costs incurred each year by the Commission and other federal departments or agencies, and are equal to the aggregate of:

The CRTC’s estimated broadcasting regulatory costs are set out in its Expenditure Plan published in Part III of the Estimates of the Government of Canada (Part III Report on Plans and Priorities).

There is an annual adjustment (‘true-up’) amount to the Part I fee to adjust estimated costs to actual expenditures. Any excess fees or shortfalls are credited or charged to the licensee in a following year’s invoice.

Part II Licence Fees

The Broadcasting Licence Fee Regulations, 1997 were amended in 2010 (Broadcasting Regulatory Policy CRTC 2010-476). A cap of $100 million was introduced for the calculation of Part II licence fees and this cap is adjusted annually on a compound basis in accordance with the percentage increase or decrease to the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for the calendar year prior to the year of the adjustments. The CPI is the annual average all-items CPI for Canada that is published by Statistics Canada.

These fees recover part of the Government of Canada’s substantial annual investment in the Canadian broadcasting system.

For 2015–2016, the CRTC assessed $109.4 million in Part II licence fees (Broadcasting Order CRTC 2015-485).

Telecommunications Fees

Section 68 of the Telecommunications Act grants the CRTC authority to create the Telecommunications Fees Regulations.

The Telecommunications Fees Regulations, 2010, published in March 2010 (Telecom Decision CRTC 2010-183 dated 25 March 2010) require all telecommunications service providers (TSPs), or groups of related TSPs, with at least $10 million dollars in Canadian telecommunications service revenues (CTSR) to pay Telecommunications Fees, whether or not they file a tariff for approval with the Commission. The Telecommunications Fees Regulations can be found on the Department of Justice website.

For 2015–2016, the CRTC assessed $27.3 million in telecommunications fees, including "true-up" and adjustments (Telecom Order CRTC 2015-209).

The CRTC’s annual telecommunications fees are equal to the aggregate of:

The CRTC’s estimated telecommunications regulatory costs are set out in its Expenditure Plan, published in Part III of the Estimates of the Government of Canada (Part III - Report on Plans and Priorities).

There is an annual adjustment (‘true-up’) amount to the telecommunications fees to adjust estimated costs to actual expenditures. Any excess fees or shortfalls are credited or charged to the carriers in the following year’s invoice.

Unsolicited Telecommunications Fees

Unsolicited Telecommunications Fees - Section 41.21(1) of the Telecommunications Act grants the CRTC authority to create the Unsolicited Telecommunications Fees Regulations. The Unsolicited Telecommunications Fees Regulations, came into effect on April 1, 2013. These fees are used to fund the CRTC’s National Do Not Call List (DNCL) investigation and enforcement activities, on a cost recovery basis, from fees assessed to telemarketers. In accordance with subsection 4(4) of the Unsolicited Telecommunications Fees Regulations (SOR/2013-7), the Commission’s telemarketing regulatory costs for the fiscal year 2015-16 were estimated at $3.3M. The actual amount of Unsolicited Telecommunications fees revenue collected amounted to $3.7M. As the total amount paid in 2015-16 exceeded the estimated $3.3M in regulatory costs, the excess amount of $0.4M was refunded to telemarketers in accordance with the formula set out in subsection 4(2) of the Regulations. (Compliance and Enforcement Order CRTC 2016-187). These regulations can be found on the Department of Justice website.

Summary of CRTC Fees:

Part I Broadcasting Fees 2013-14 $ 30.5M Broadcasting Order CRTC 2013-61
2014-15 $29.2M Broadcasting Order CRTC 2014-84
2015-16 $30.0M Broadcasting Order CRTC 2015-101
Part II Broadcasting Fees 2013-14 $106.3M Broadcasting Order CRTC 2013-571
2014-15 $107.2M Broadcasting Order CRTC 2014-557
2015-16 $109.4M Broadcasting Order CRTC 2015-485
Telecommunications Fees 2013-14 $ 25.9M Telecom Order CRTC 2013-280
2014-15 $27.0M Telecom Order CRTC 2014-303
2015-16 $27.3M Telecom Order CRTC 2015-209
Unsolicited Telecommunications Fees 2013-14 $3.3M Compliance and Enforcement Order CRTC 2014-307
2014-15 $3.3M Compliance and Enforcement Order CRTC 2015-193
2015-16 $3.3M Compliance and Enforcement Order CRTC 2016-187

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Target 7.2: Green Procurement
As of April 1, 2014, the Government of Canada will continue to take action to embed environmental considerations into public procurement, in accordance with the federal Policy on Green Procurement.
Performance Measurement
Expected result
Environmentally responsible acquisition, use and disposal of goods and services.
Performance indicator Targeted performance level
Target Status On track
Departmental approach to further the implementation of the Policy on Green Procurement in place as of April 1, 2014. To meet green procurement objectives, CRTC follows an approach that includes the use of Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC) procurement instruments and specific training for functional specialist staff.
Number and percentage of procurement and/or materiel management specialists who have completed the Canada School of Public Service Green Procurement course (C215) or equivalent, in fiscal year 2015-16. Number: 1

100%
Number and percentage of procurement managers and functional heads whose performance evaluation includes support and contribution toward green procurement, in fiscal year 2015-16. In FY 2016-17, the CRTC will include green procurement measurements in the performance evaluation of the manager in charge of procurement.
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