Report on the Operation of the National Do Not Call List for the period April 1, 2012 to March 31, 2013

Presented to: The Honourable James Moore Minister of Industry

September 30, 2013

Download this report in PDF.


Table of Contents

Executive Summary

Section 1 – Introduction

1.1 – Purpose

1.2 – Scope of the report

Section 2 – Costs and expenditures

2.1 – Operating the national DNCL

2.2 – CRTC costs

Section 3 – Canadian number registrations

Section 4 – Telemarketer access

Section 5 –  Updates in the prohibitions or requirements

Section 6 – New Compliance and Enforcement Initiatives

Section 7 – Effectiveness of the List

7.1 – Feedback from Canadians

7.2 – Complaints

7.3 – Investigations, compliance, and enforcement

Appendices

Appendix 1 – Canadian Number Registrations

Table 1.1 – Total registrations by province/territory

Table 1.2 – Monthly registrations by province/territory

Figure 1.1 – Provincial/territorial number registrations as a percentage of national registrations

Figure 1.2 – Canadian number registrations as a percentage of
provincial/territorial population

Appendix 2 – Telemarketer Registration

Table 2.1 – Canadian telemarketer registration by month and by
province/territory

Figure 2.1 – Telemarketer registrations by month

Appendix 3 – Complaints

Table 3.1 – Complaints requiring further investigation into potential
violations of the Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules

Appendix 4 – Summary Tables

Table 4.1 – Summary of complaints and registrations

Table 4.2 – Summary of subscriptions


Executive Summary

This report by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) summarizes the operation of the National Do Not Call List (DNCL or the List) for the period of April 1, 2012 to March 31, 2013 (the reporting period).

The goal of the National DNCL is to reduce the number of unwanted telemarketing calls made to Canadians, thus protecting their privacy and preventing undue inconvenience and nuisance, while still allowing legitimate uses of telemarketing telecommunications. Consumer feedback obtained through independent polling conducted by the Marketing Research and Intelligence Association in April 2012 demonstrates that this goal is being achieved. Eighty percent of respondents stated that they receive fewer telemarketing calls. Since its inception in September 2008, Canadians have registered nearly 11.5 million telephone and fax numbers to the National DNCL.

During the reporting period, the CRTC completed its first round of on-site inspections of 16 telemarketing companies located in Toronto, Montréal, and Edmonton. These inspections were conducted to ensure telemarketers are complying with the Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules (the Rules). The initial inspections focused on telemarketers in a number of industries, which were chosen based on trends in complaints submitted by Canadians.

In addition to these domestic efforts, the CRTC is working with partner agencies in other countries due to the international nature of telemarketing. During the reporting period, the CRTC undertook two investigations in collaboration with the U.S. Federal Trade Commission and the Australian Communications and Media Authority. The CRTC took enforcement action against two companies based in India for violating Canada’s Rules.

The CRTC also co-chaired the second meeting of the International Do Not Call Network, welcoming three new enforcement agencies. Agencies from the Netherlands, Portugal, and Japan joined telecommunications enforcement agencies from 13 different countries, bringing the network to a total of 16 countries. Members meet annually to share best practices and encourage the development of robust telemarketing laws around the globe.

In 2012-2013, the CRTC established a cost-recovery regime for its DNCL investigation and enforcement activities. In June 2012, amendments to section 41.21 of the Telecommunications Act (the Act) granted the CRTC the authority to (1) make regulations prescribing fees to be paid by any person subscribing to the National DNCL, and (2) delegate the power to collect fees that it has prescribed in such regulations to a delegate. As a result, the CRTC established the Unsolicited Telecommunications Fees Regulations1 and has authorized the National DNCL operator, effective 1 April 2013, to recover these fees from telemarketers at the same time that it charges them for subscriptions to access and download the National DNCL. The current subscription fees for accessing the National DNCL as of 1 April 2013 are divided into two components: one component identified for funding the National DNCL operator, and a second component identified for funding the Commission’s investigation and enforcement activities (the Commission’s telemarketing regulatory costs). The Commission intends to maintain the combined rates at current levels. These fees will be remitted to the CRTC for deposit into the Consolidated Revenue Fund, and will provide an ongoing source of funding for the CRTC’s DNCL-related activities.

National DNCL results for the reporting period

1. Introduction

1.1 Purpose

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) submits this report to the Minister of Industry pursuant to section 41.6 of the Telecommunications Act (the Act), which states the following:

  1. The Commission shall, within six months after the end of each fiscal year, deliver a report to the Minister on the operation of the national do not call list in that fiscal year.
  2. The report shall set out any costs or expenditures related to the list, the number of Canadians using the list, the number of telemarketers accessing the list, any inconsistencies in the prohibitions or requirements of the Commission under section 41 that are applicable to the operation of the list, and an analysis of the effectiveness of the list.
  3. The Minister shall cause a copy of the report referred to in subsection (1) to be laid before each House of Parliament on any of the first fifteen days on which that House is sitting after the Minister receives the report.

1.2 Scope of the report

This report examines the status of the National Do Not Call List’s (DNCL) operations as of March 31, 2013. It covers the following:

The CRTC, Bell Canada (the National DNCL operator), and the Marketing Research and Intelligence Association (MRIA) provided data included in this report.

2. Costs and expenditures

2.1 Operating the National DNCL

The National DNCL is a fully bilingual system consisting of Web, fax, interactive voice response, and live operator access. As the National DNCL operator, Bell Canada is responsible for

Despite the complexity of the National DNCL system, no major unexpected costs have arisen. Under the Act, the costs associated with the development and operations of the List are covered by revenues from telemarketers’ subscriptions to the List. Bell Canada’s costs associated with these activities for the National DNCL are outlined below.

Bell Canada’s costs (millions)
  Fiscal years
2007-2008 to 2008-2009
Fiscal year 2009-2010 Fiscal year 2010-2011 Fiscal year 2011-2012 Fiscal year 2012-2013 Total
  April 1, 2008 – September 30, 2008
(prior to launch)
October 1, 2008 – March 31, 2009
(after launch)
April 1, 2009 – March 31, 2010 April 1, 2010 – March 31, 2011 April 1, 2011 – March 31, 2012 April 1, 2012 – March 31, 2013 January 1, 2008 – March 31, 2012
Capital expenditure $5.49 $2.32 $0.99 $0.04 $0 $0 $8.84
Expenses $1.58 $2.84 $4.00 $2.87 $2.40 $2.37 $16.06
Total $7.07 $5.16 $4.99 $2.91 $2.40 $2.37 $24.90

2.2 CRTC costs

The CRTC is responsible for a number of activities related to the National DNCL, including

The CRTC’s expenses associated with the activities listed above were approximately $1.1 million in fiscal year 2007-2008, $2.1 million in fiscal year 2008-2009, $3.2 million in fiscal year 2009-2010, $3.1 million in fiscal year 2010-2011, $2.9 million in fiscal year 2011-2012, and $3.1 million in fiscal year 2012-2013, for a total of approximately $15.5 million. These amounts include all salary and operations and maintenance costs.

In 2012-2013, the CRTC established a cost-recovery regime for its investigation and enforcement activities by developing the Unsolicited Telecommunications Fees Regulations (the Regulations).4  The Regulations, which came into force on April 1, 2013, authorize the National DNCL operator to recover fees related to the Commission’s investigation and enforcement costs from telemarketers at the same time that it charges them for subscriptions to access and download the National DNCL. The current subscription fees for accessing the National DNCL as of 1 April 2013 will be divided into two components: one component identified for funding the National DNCL operator, and a second component identified for funding the Commission’s investigation and enforcement activities (the Commission’s telemarketing regulatory costs). The Commission intends to maintain the combined rates at current levels. These fees will be remitted by the National DNCL operator to the CRTC for deposit into the Consolidated Revenue Fund, and provide an ongoing source of funding for the CRTC’s DNCL-related activities.

3. Canadian number registrations

The National DNCL continues to receive new registrations on a daily basis. During the reporting period, an additional 778,056 Canadians registered their telephone and/or fax numbers. As of March 31, 2013, there were 11,442,337 registered numbers.

Canadians also have the option to deregister their numbers from the National DNCL. During the reporting period, 4,784 numbers were deregistered by users, bringing the total of deregistered numbers to 47,015 as of March 31, 2013. The number of deregistrations, as compared to registrations, is very small and provides further evidence the National DNCL is in strong demand and continues to meet Canadians’ needs.

The following charts provide a breakdown of the Canadian number registrations by month and by province/territory as of the end of the reporting period. Charts showing provincial and territorial registrations as a percentage of total registrations and as a percentage of population are set out in section 1 of the Appendix.

This bar graph shows the number of Canadian numbers registered to the National DNCL by month, from April 1, 2012 to March 31, 2013 as follows – April: 79,605; May: 55,428; June: 42,181; July: 50,650; August: 57,665; September: 89,206; October: 61,002; November: 47,005; December: 26,625; January: 55,826; February: 75,901; March: 136,962.

This bar graph shows the number of Canadian numbers registered to the National DNCL by province or territory as of March 31, 2013. Alberta: 77,702; British Columbia: 99,990; Manitoba: 29,109; New Brunswick: 12,863; Newfoundland and Labrador: 6,078; Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island: 20,519; Ontario: 304,910; Quebec: 202,930; Saskatchewan: 22,966; Yukon, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut: 989. Note: Data is not separated for Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island or Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut.

*Data for these locations is not separated since they share one area code (area code 902 in Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island, and area code 867 in Yukon, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut. Non-geographic area codes 500 and 600 are combined with area code 867. The total number of registrations as of March 31, 2013 for the Yukon, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut is 989).

4. Telemarketer access

Organizations that either make telemarketing telecommunications directly or hire third parties to make telecommunications on their behalf must register with the National DNCL operator. Moreover, businesses that make telemarketing telecommunications on behalf of others are encouraged to register with the National DNCL operator.

Telecommunications made by or on behalf of the following are exempt5 from the National DNCL Rules:6

In addition, telecommunications made for the sole purpose of collecting information for a survey of members of the public or soliciting a subscription for a newspaper of general circulation, and telecommunications to business consumers are also exempt from the National DNCL Rules.

The following table shows the annual number of telemarketing company registrations to the National DNCL by country as of March 31, 2012. During the reporting period, 830 telemarketers registered.

Telemarketer country Registrations as of March 31, 2009 Registrations as of March 31, 2010 Registrations as of March 31, 2011 Registrations as of March 31, 2012 Registrations as of March 31, 2013 Registrations during the reporting period*
Canada 5,680 7,227 8,098 8,996 9,762 776
United States 136 209 261 304 347 43
India 15 28 29 36 15 4
Philippines 14 20 20 21 4 2
Pakistan 5 13 13 13 13 0
Mexico 3 3 3 4 2 0
Australia 1  0 2 2 1 0
Egypt  0 0  0 1 1 0
Great Britain  0 0 1 1 0
Ireland  0 1 1 1 0
Japan  0 1 1 1 1 0
Peru 1 1 1 1 1 0
Ukraine 1 1 1 1 0 0
Netherlands         2 2
Switzerland         1 1
France         1 1
Morocco         1 1
Total 5,856 7,503 8,430 9,382 10,154 830

*Values are not cumulative

Table 2.1 in the Appendix shows telemarketer registrations by month and by province/territory.

In addition to registering, telemarketers making non-exempt telecommunications must subscribe to the National DNCL. A wide variety of subscription options is available to the diverse companies and organizations that conduct telemarketing. Pricing flexibility allows telemarketers to select their subscription method based on the number of area codes to which they make telecommunications and the number of months in which they will be telemarketing. Once they have subscribed, they use the List to “scrub,” or remove, numbers that are registered on the National DNCL from their own calling lists. Businesses or organizations targeting a limited number of Canadians may also check specific numbers to find out if they are registered.

Telemarketers purchased 2,109 subscriptions during the reporting period. The majority of these subscriptions purchased were for one month. The number of subscriptions purchased per month during the reporting period is shown below.

 

This bar graph shows the number of telemarketer subscriptions purchased by month from April 1, 2012 to March 31, 2013, as follows – April: 152; May: 152; June: 125; July: 170; August: 305; September: 204; October: 235; November: 158; December: 112; January: 187; February: 129; March: 148.

5. Updates in the prohibitions or requirements

After Parliament amended the Act in 2005 to allow for the creation and operation of a national do not call list, the CRTC initiated a public process to establish a framework for such a list.7 While the CRTC considers that there are no inconsistencies in the prohibitions or requirements under section 41 of the Act that are applicable to the operation of the List, it did review interpretation issues related to the financial, real estate, and insurance industries in 2008, 2009, and 2010.

In 2009, the CRTC extended the registration period for Canadians’ numbers to remain on the National DNCL from three to five years. The CRTC is currently studying the feasibility of a permanent registration regime and engaged the CRTC Industry Steering Committee (CISC) to examine this issue and report on its feasibility.8  Preliminary analysis began to consider the appropriateness of a permanent number registration regime. In the coming year, the CRTC will initiate a public consultation on this consideration. 

In March 2012, the CRTC initiated a public consultation to conduct a comprehensive review of the Rules. The CRTC requested input from consumers, telemarketers, and other interested persons on ways to make the Rules more effective in reducing the number of unwanted telemarketing calls while facilitating more effective communications between organizations and consumers. In the coming year, the CRTC will issue a decision regarding this initiative. 

The CRTC is examining how Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) and other technology affects the enforcement of the Rules. One of the significant enforcement challenges raised by technology is the ability it provides to originators of calls to falsify (“spoof”) the number that appears on consumers’ caller identification (ID) display. This is exacerbated by VoIP and ADAD technologies, which have led to an increasing number of complaints about spoofed telemarketing calls that are not in compliance with the Rules. It is extremely challenging to enforce the Rules in such circumstances given the difficulty in tracing such calls to their origin, which is often outside of Canada. The CRTC is currently exploring various initiatives in partnership with its international counterparts and other stakeholders to reduce the incidence of caller ID spoofing.

6. New Compliance and Enforcement Initiatives

The CRTC is responsible for the investigation and enforcement of the Rules. Over the course of the reporting period, the CRTC modified its investigative processes in order to help telemarketers achieve greater compliance with the Rules. The modifications included using the inspection power pursuant to section 72.06 of the Act as an additional investigative tool.

During the reporting period, the CRTC completed its first round of on-site inspections of 16 telemarketing companies located in Toronto, Montréal, and Edmonton. These inspections were conducted to ensure telemarketers were in compliance with the Rules. These initial inspections focused on telemarketers in a number of industries, which were chosen based on trends in complaints submitted by Canadians.

In addition to these domestic efforts, the CRTC is working with partner agencies in other countries due to the international nature of telemarketing. During the reporting period, the CRTC undertook two investigations in collaboration with the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA). In addition, the CRTC co-chaired the second meeting of the International Do Not Call Network, welcoming three new enforcement agencies. Agencies from the Netherlands, Portugal, and Japan joined telecommunications enforcement agencies from 13 different countries, bringing the network to a total of 16 countries. Members meet annually to share best practices and encourage the development of robust telemarketing laws around the globe.

In October 2012, the CRTC undertook two investigations in collaboration with the FTC and the ACMA, after which it took enforcement action against two companies based in India for violating Canada’s Rules. The CRTC found that these companies were making unsolicited telemarketing calls to Canadians who had registered their numbers on the National DNCL. The caller would typically warn consumers that their home computer was infected with a virus and encouraged them to purchase online technical support or anti-virus software. In certain cases, the callers would request remote access to the computer.

7. Effectiveness of the List

7.1 Feedback from Canadians

The goal of the National DNCL is to reduce the number of unwanted telemarketing calls made to Canadians, thus protecting their privacy and preventing undue inconvenience and nuisance, while still allowing legitimate uses of telemarketing telecommunications. Consumer feedback obtained through independent polling demonstrates that this goal is being achieved.

Public awareness of the National DNCL has been high since its launch. Independent surveys conducted by the MRIA in 2007 and annually from 2009 to 2012 all show that awareness of the National DNCL among adult Canadians was and remains above 80 percent.9 In addition, the 2012 MRIA survey, which polled a number of people whose numbers were registered on the National DNCL, found that 78 percent of respondents say they now receive fewer telemarketing calls. The percentage of respondents who stated that they now receive fewer telemarketing calls was highest in Quebec (91 percent), followed by Atlantic Canada (90 percent), British Columbia (84 percent), Ontario (76 percent), Alberta (69 percent), and Manitoba and Saskatchewan (59 percent).

Survey indications 2009 survey 2010 survey 2011 survey 2012 survey
Noticeably fewer or far fewer telemarketing calls 50% 54% 51% 42%
Slightly fewer telemarketing calls 20% 21% 24% 31%
No such calls at all 10% 10% 5% 5%
More telemarketing calls 13% 12% 15% 18%

These survey results demonstrate that, from the perspective of the Canadian public, the National DNCL continues to be effective in reducing the number of unwanted telemarketing calls.

However, the rising number of unregistered foreign telemarketers using automatic dialers to phone Canadians, whether they are registered on the National DNCL or not, is becoming more  of a challenge. Further, exempted calls may increase at certain times, such as during elections or charitable campaigns. While these calls may not constitute violations, they may cause the reporting of higher levels of unwanted calls.

7.2 Complaints

Canadians who believe that a telemarketer has violated the Rules may submit a complaint to the National DNCL operator via a toll-free phone number or online.

The CRTC received 148,846 complaints during the reporting period, an 11 percent increase over the previous reporting period, for a total of 678,818 complaints since the National DNCL was launched. A prima facie assessment by CRTC staff determined that 111,687 of the 148,846 complaints during the reporting period, for a total of 431,697 complaints since the inception of the National DNCL, regarded potential violations of the Rules and warranted further investigation. The remaining 37,159 complaints for the reporting period were found to not relate to violations of the Rules for a variety of reasons including, but not limited to, jurisdictional issues, complaints made about telecommunications with valid exemptions, or lack of necessary information to pursue a complaint.

CRTC staff analyzes complaints and investigates them, when deemed appropriate based on a prima facie determination. During the reporting period, the CRTC initiated 74 investigations, for a total of 1,369 since the launch of the National DNCL, which encompass 262,775 complaints. Any complaints currently not under investigation can be categorized in one of three ways: they are found to be invalid; the originating telemarketer cannot be identified, rendering them inactionable; or they are under review. To date, over 1,300 investigations have been concluded. During the reporting period, the CRTC concluded 207 investigations, some of which were initiated before the reporting period.

7.3 Investigations, compliance, and enforcement

The CRTC’s goal is to promote and ensure compliance with the Rules. If telemarketers do not adhere to the Rules, the CRTC takes the appropriate enforcement measures to bring them into compliance.

The CRTC has promoted compliance in several ways, including its adoption of new compliance and enforcement approaches. The investigation process is used to determine the identity of foreign or domestic telemarketers and substantiate the validity of complaints. This can be time-consuming depending on the complexity of the investigation, particularly in those instances where telemarketers misidentify themselves and/or display false numbers (known as “spoofing”).

The CRTC has the authority, under section 72.05 of the Act, to send a Request for Information letter to telemarketers. These letters state that the organization is under investigation and require that specific information be submitted to the CRTC. If at any time the CRTC suspects that the organization may be engaged in criminal activities, it notifies the appropriate agency that is empowered to pursue such investigations. These agencies include the Competition Bureau and other law enforcement agencies.

In some cases, investigation by the CRTC reveals that telemarketers placed the calls in question pursuant to a valid exemption of the National DNCL Rules, such as an existing business relationship exemption.

In cases where an investigation reveals that violations have occurred, the CRTC may issue compliance letters to telemarketers. Compliance letters identify the alleged violation(s) and require the telemarketer to take specific corrective measures to prevent future violations. The CRTC issued 21 compliance letters during the reporting period, and a total of 295 compliance or warning letters have been issued since the inception of the List. Most telemarketers undertake the necessary corrective measures outlined in the letters they receive. The combination of awareness activities and enforcement actions has been effective in bringing many telemarketers into compliance with the Rules.

In other cases, a citation, as described in section 2 of this report, is more appropriate. During the reporting period, the CRTC issued nine citations to telemarketers who had violated various provisions of the Rules.

If other compliance measures fail, or are not appropriate, notices of violation may be issued to telemarketers. These notices set out proposed AMPs for violations of the Rules. A telemarketer that receives a notice with an AMP may pay the penalty or, pursuant to section 72.07 of the Act, make representations to the CRTC.

When representations are made, a panel of CRTC Commissioners reviews the representations and determines, on a balance of probabilities, whether a violation has been committed. The panel may then impose the proposed AMP. The CRTC has the authority to impose an AMP of up to $1,500 on an individual and of up to $15,000 on a corporation for each violation committed. A violation that continues on more than one day constitutes a separate violation in respect of each day which it is continued. During the reporting period, eight notices of violation with AMPs were issued to telemarketers. A panel of CRTC Commissioners issued and confirmed four notices of violation with AMPs totalling $43,000. CRTC staff issued four notices of violation, with AMPs totalling $184,900 following settlement negotiations. Eleven notices of violation, with AMPs totalling $662,000, were issued by CRTC staff and were pending a response from the parties as of the end of the reporting period. Since the inception of the National DNCL, a total of 70 notices of violation have been issued, with AMPs totalling $2,665,900. The CRTC has also negotiated other payments in regards to telemarketing, totalling $741,000.

If the telemarketer neither pays the penalty nor makes representations in accordance with the notice, it is deemed, pursuant to subsection 72.08(3) of the Act to have committed the violation, and the CRTC may impose the AMP.

If the CRTC has imposed an AMP and the telemarketer has not paid the penalty, the CRTC pursues collection action. The CRTC uses various methods to collect outstanding accounts. These include, but are not limited to, actions such as (1) referring outstanding accounts to collection agencies or the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), for refund offset of funds otherwise payable by the CRA, and (2) certifying the amount and registering the certificate with the Federal Court for collection through the Court’s procedures.

The CRTC publishes a monthly National DNCL status report on its website. The report contains monthly and cumulative information on a number of key variables, including the number of telephone and fax numbers registered on the National DNCL; the number of complaints; the number of new, closed, and active investigations; the number of notices of violation issued; and the number of AMPs imposed. The status report also contains a list of CRTC decisions regarding violations of the Rules. This list identifies the companies that have been found to be in violation of the Rules and contains a URL link to each of the decisions. These decisions contain information on the circumstances of the case and the amount of the AMP levied.

The CRTC will continue to use its authority to impose AMPs on telemarketers that do not comply with the Rules. The National DNCL List operator, on behalf of the CRTC, has developed a process to notify telemarketers whose subscriptions are about to expire. This process is designed to improve due diligence, and responsiveness to the National DNCL, thus ensuring that companies that conduct telemarketing activities to Canadians comply with the Rules by, among other things, subscribing to the List.

Appendix 1 - Canadian Number Registrations

Table 1.1

Total registrations by province/territory April 1, 2012 to March 31, 2013
Alberta British Columbia Manitoba New Brunswick Newfoundland and Labrador Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island* Ontario Quebec Saskatchewan Yukon, Northwest Territories, Nunavut*
77,702 99,990 29,109 12,863 6,078 20,519 304,910 202,930 22,966 989

Table 1.2

Monthly registrations by province/territory April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2012
  Apr-12 May-12 Jun-12 Jul-11 Aug-12 Sep-12 Oct-12 Nov-12 Dec-12 Jan-13 Feb-13 Mar-13
Alberta 9,713 5,349 3,995 5,496 5,855 4,674 5,353 4,904 2,563 4,910 10,026 14,864
British Columbia 11,335 5,979 6,642 7,853 7,739 5,417 6,348 5,304 3,388 7,159 13,195 19,631
Manitoba 3,077 1,557 980 2,095 4,557 1,043 2,303 1,297 638 2,275 2,156 7,131
New Brunswick 1,131 833 519 666 547 666 662 681 397 1,083 3,051 2,627
Newfoundland and Labrador 742 419 259 328 322 147 345 440 220 943 1,018 895
Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island* 1,562 1,498 1,066 1,181 911 992 1,123 1,248 632 3,085 3,938 3,283
Ontario 38,222 27,336 18,994 20,035 19,520 15,307 19,528 19,200 11,396 24,784 27,253 63,335
Quebec 10,201 9,770 8,086 11,512 16,928 59,413 23,861 12,651 6,824 10,353 13,010 20,321
Saskatchewan 3,518 2,639 1,578 1,382 1,194 1,506 1,404 1,241 547 1,182 2,116 4,659
Yukon, Northwest Territories, Nunavut* 104 48 62 102 92 41 75 39 20 52 138 216
Total registrations 79,605 55,428 42,181 50,650 57,665 89,206 61,002 47,005 26,625 55,826 75,901 136,962

*Data for these locations is not separated since they share one area code (area code 902 in Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island; area code 867 in Yukon, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut. Non-geographic area codes 500 and 600 are combined with area code 867).

Figure 1.1

This pie chart shows provincial and territorial number registrations as of March 31, 2013 as a percentage of national registrations. Alberta: 11 percent; British Columbia: 12 percent; Manitoba: 3 percent; New Brunswick: 2 percent; Newfoundland and Labrador: 3 percent; Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island: 1 percent; Ontario: 44 percent; Quebec: 21 percent; Saskatchewan: 3 percent; Yukon, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut: 0.1 percent. Note: Data is not separated for Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island or Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut.

*Data for these locations is not separated since they share one area code (area code 902 in Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island, and area code 867 in Yukon, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut. Non-geographic area codes 500 and 600 are combined with area code 867).

Figure 1.2

This bar graph shows Canadian number registrations as of March 31, 2012 as a percentage of each province or territory’s population – Alberta: 36 percent; British Columbia: 32 percent; Manitoba: 31 percent; New Brunswick: 30 percent; Newfoundland: 68 percent; Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island: 14 percent; Ontario: 39 percent; Quebec: 30 percent; Saskatchewan: 29 percent; Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut: 11 percent. Note: Data is not separated for Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island or Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut.

*Data for these locations is not separated since they share one area code (area code 902 in Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island, and area code 867 in Yukon, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut. Non-geographic area codes 500 and 600 are combined with area code 867).

Appendix 2 - Telemarketer Registration

Table 2.1

Canadian telemarketer registrations by month and by province/territory April 1, 2012 to March 31, 2013
  Apr-12 May-12 Jun-12 Jul-12 Aug-12 Sep-12 Oct-12 Nov-12 Dec-12 Jan-13 Feb-13 Mar-13 Total
Alberta 14 8 8 10 2 7 4 12 4 2 5 6 82
British Columbia 9 5 11 14 6 5 8 9 5 6 14 4 96
Manitoba 2 2 2 2 2 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 14
New Brunswick 2 1 1 0 1 1 2 0 1 2 0 1 12
Newfoundland and Labrador 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 5
Nova Scotia 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 2 0 0 1 0 12
Ontario 25 26 25 28 29 38 21 22 15 24 24 22 299
Prince Edward Island 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 4
Quebec 15 15 17 18 30 26 20 29 12 11 15 24 232
Saskatchewan 2 1 1 5 2 0 2 2 0 0 1 1 17
Yukon, Northwest Territories, Nunavut 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 3
Total Canadian telemarketer registrations 72 61 68 79 74 79 60 76 40 45 62 60 776

Figure 2.1

This bar graph shows the number of Canadian telemarketer registrations by month from April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2012, as follows – April: 72; May: 61; June: 68; July: 79; August: 74; September: 79; October: 60; November: 76; December: 40; January: 45; February: 62; March: 60.

Appendix 3 - Complaints

Table 3.1

Complaints requiring further investigation into potential violations of the Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules
April 1, 2012 to March 31, 2013
Apr-12 May-12 Jun-12 Jul-12 Aug-12 Sep-12 Oct-12 Nov-12 Dec-12 Jan-13 Feb-13 Mar-13 Total
13,019 13,269 11,781 17,805 18,255 11,390 11,123 10,290 8,126 11,747 11,439 10,602 148,846

Appendix 4 - Summary Tables

Table 4.1

Summary of complaints and registrations
  Period ending March 2009* Period ending March 2010 Period ending March 2011 Period ending March 2012 Period ending March 2013 Cumulative increase from 2009 to 2010 Cumulative increase from 2010 to 2011 Cumulative increase from 2011 to 2012 Cumulative increase from 2012 to 2013
Telemarketer registrations 5,896 7,548 8,478 9,382 9,789 28% 12% 11% 4%
Complaints requiring further investigation 78,863 216,120 318,795 431,679 449,853 174% 48% 35% 15%
Canadian number registrations 6,676,550 8,280,806 9,476,414 10,707,979 11,487,798 24% 14% 13% 7.3%
Canadian number deregistrations 6,888 12,911 25,759 42,227 45,461 87% 100% 64% 7.66%
Total net registrations 6,669,662 8,267,895 9,450,655 10,665,752 11,442,337 24% 14% 13% 7.3%
Canadian number registrations by province/territory
Alberta 818,310 973,299 1,093,611 1,227,373 1,300,970 19% 12% 12% 6%
British Columbia 741,213 967,684 1,129,596 1,321,040 1,416,152 31% 17% 17% 7%
Manitoba 205,764 257,662 288,625 341,521 369,070 25% 12% 18% 8%
New Brunswick 135,968 161,608 183,662 210,831 222,496 19% 14% 15% 5%
Newfoundland and Labrador 72,420 93,467 107,831 124,370 129,991 29% 15% 15% 4%
Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island** 228,442 260,857 291,876 331,126 349,855 14% 12% 13% 6%
Ontario 3,031,606 3,655,938 4,152,915 4,716,180 5,003,701 21% 14% 14% 6%
Quebec 1,262,505 1,682,081 1,957,211 2,145,192 2,338,670 33% 16% 10% 9%
Saskatchewan 168,058 207,703 236,518 278,457 300,050 24% 14% 18% 8%
Yukon, Northwest Territories, Nunavut** 5,365 7,583 8,796 10,418 11,382 41% 16% 18% 9%
Non-geographic area codes 11 13 14 16 21 18% 8% 14% 31%
Total 6,669,662 8,267,895 9,450,655 10,706,524 11,442,358 24% 14% 13% 7%

*This period covers September 30, 2008 to March 31, 2009

**Data for these locations is not separated since they share one area code (area code 902 in Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island, and area code 867 in Yukon, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut).

Table 4.2

Summary of subscriptions
  Period ending March 2009* Period ending March 2010 Period ending March 2011 Period ending March 2012 Period ending March 2013 Percentage relative increase from 2009 to 2010 Percentage relative increase from 2010 to 2011 Percentage relative increase from 2011 to 2012 Percentage relative increase from 2012 to 2013
Telemarketer subscriptions 2,497 2,623 2,350 2,093 2,109 5% -11% -11% 1%

*This period covers September 30, 2008 to March 31, 2009


[1] See Unsolicited Telecommunications Fees Regulations, Compliance and Enforcement Decision CRTC 2013-26, 28 January 2013.

[2] The Rules include the National DNCL Rules, the Telemarketing Rules, and the Automatic Dialing-Announcing Device (ADAD) Rules.

[3] Compliance letters and citations are notices issued pursuant to an investigation under section 41 of the Act, and do not impose AMPs.

[4] See Unsolicited Telecommunications Fees Regulations, Compliance and Enforcement Decision CRTC 2013-26, 28 January 2013.

[5] Exemptions to the Rules can be found under section 41.7 of the Act. 

[6] The Telemarketing Rules and ADAD Rules still apply.

[7] The framework was set out in CRTC Interconnection Steering Committee Do Not Call List Operations Working Group reports, Telecom Decision CRTC 2007-47, 3 July 2007 and Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules framework and the National Do Not Call List, Telecom Decision CRTC 2007-48, 3 July 2007, as amended by Telecom Decision CRTC 2007-48-1, 19 July 2007. The framework has been amended in subsequent decisions.

[8] Agenda for Steering Committee Meeting of 15 March 2013

[9] VoxPop survey, MRIA, August 2007
VoxPop survey, MRIA, January – February 2009
VoxPop survey, MRIA, February – March 2010
VoxPop survey, MRIA, March – April 2011
VoxPop survey, MRIA, March – April 2012
Do Not Call List Blocks Telemarketers: Survey (Marketing Research and Intelligence Association website)

Date modified: